Publications

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2015
Wang, K, Fialko Y.  2015.  Slip model of the 2015 M-w 7.8 Gorkha (Nepal) earthquake from inversions of ALOS-2 and GPS data. Geophysical Research Letters. 42:7452-7458.   10.1002/2015gl065201   AbstractWebsite

We use surface deformation measurements including Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquired by the ALOS-2 mission of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency and Global Positioning System (GPS) data to invert for the fault geometry and coseismic slip distribution of the 2015 M-w 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal. Assuming that the ruptured fault connects to the surface trace of the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) fault between 84.34 degrees E and 86.19 degrees E, the best fitting model suggests a dip angle of 7 degrees. The moment calculated from the slip model is 6.08 x 10(20)Nm, corresponding to the moment magnitude of 7.79. The rupture of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake was dominated by thrust motion that was primarily concentrated in a 150km long zone 50 to 100km northward from the surface trace of the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT), with maximum slip of approximate to 5.8m at a depth of approximate to 8km. Data thus indicate that the 2015 Gorkha earthquake ruptured a deep part of the seismogenic zone, in contrast to the 1934 Bihar-Nepal earthquake, which had ruptured a shallow part of the adjacent fault segment to the east.

2014
Wang, K, Fialko Y.  2014.  Space geodetic observations and models of postseismic deformation due to the 2005 M7.6 Kashmir (Pakistan) earthquake. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 119:7306-7318.   10.1002/2014jb011122   AbstractWebsite

We use the L-band Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and C-band Envisat interferometric synthetic aperture data and campaign GPS observations to study the postseismic deformation due to the 2005 magnitude 7.6 Kashmir (Pakistan) earthquake that occurred in the northwestern Himalaya. Envisat data are available from both the descending and ascending orbits and span a time period of similar to 4.5years immediately following the earthquake (2005-2010), with nearly monthly acquisitions. However, the Envisat data are highly decorrelated due to high topography and snow cover. ALOS data are available from the ascending orbit and span a time period of similar to 2.5years between 2007 and 2009, over which they remain reasonably well correlated. We derive the mean line-of-sight (LOS) postseismic velocity maps in the epicentral area of the Kashmir earthquake using persistent scatterer method for Envisat data and selective stacking for ALOS data. LOS velocities from all data sets indicate an uplift (decrease in radar range), primarily in the hanging wall of the earthquake rupture over the entire period of synthetic aperture radar observations (2005-2010). Models of poroelastic relaxation predict uplift of both the footwall and the hanging wall, while models of viscoelastic relaxation below the brittle-ductile transition predict subsidence (increase in radar range) in both the footwall and the hanging wall. Therefore, the observed pattern of surface velocities indicates that the early several years of postseismic deformation were dominated by afterslip on the fault plane, possibly with a minor contribution from poroelastic rebound. Kinematic inversions of interferometric synthetic aperture radar and GPS data confirm that the observed deformation is consistent with afterslip, primarily downdip of the seismic asperity. To place constraints on the effective viscosity of the ductile substrate in the study area, we subtract the surface deformation predicted by stress-driven afterslip model from the mean LOS velocities and compare the residuals to models of viscoelastic relaxation for a range of assumed viscosities. We show that in order to prevent surface subsidence, the effective viscosity has to be greater than 10(19)Pas. ations are negligible

2001
Fialko, Y, Simons M, Khazan Y.  2001.  Finite source modelling of magmatic unrest in Socorro, New Mexico, and Long Valley, California. Geophysical Journal International. 146:191-200.   10.1046/j.1365-246X.2001.00453.x   AbstractWebsite

We investigate surface deformation associated with currently active crustal magma bodies in Socorro, New Mexico, and Long Valley, California, USA. We invert available geodetic data from these locations to constrain the overall geometry and dynamics of the inferred deformation sources at depth. Our brst-fitting model for the Socorro magma body is a sill with a depth of 19 km, an effective diameter of 70 km and a rate of increase in the excess magma pressure of 0.6 kPa yr(-1). We show that the corresponding volumetric inflation rate is similar to6 x 10(-3) km(3) yr(-1), which is considerably less than previously suggested. The measured inflation rate of the Socorro magma body may result from a steady influx of magma from a deep source, or a volume increase associated with melting of the magma chamber roof (i.e. crustal anatexis). In the latter case, the most recent major injection of mantle-derived melts into the middle crust beneath Socorro map have occurred within the last several tens to several hundreds of years. The Synthetic Interferometric Aperture Radar (InSAR) data collected in the area of the Long Valley caldera, CA, between June 1996 and July 1998 reveal an intracaldera uplift with a maximum amplitude of similar to 11 cm and a volume of 3.5 x 10(-2) km(3). Modelling of the InSAR data suggests that the observed deformation might be due to either a sill-like magma body at a depth of similar to 12 km or a pluton-like magma body at a depth of similar to8 km beneath the resurgent dome. Assuming that the caldera fill deforms as an isotropic linear elastic solid, a joint inversion of the InSAR data and two-colons laser geodimeter data (which provide independent constraints on horizontal displacements at the surface) suggests that the inferred magma chamber is a steeply dipping prolate spheroid with a depth of 7-9 km and an aspect ratio in excess of 2:1. Our results highlight the need for large radar look angles and multiple look directions in future InSAR missions.