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Ohman, MD, Rudnick DL, Chekalyuk A, Davis RE, Feely RA, Kahru M, Kim HJ, Landry MR, Martz TR, Sabine CL, Send U.  2013.  Autonomous ocean measurements in the California Current ecosystem. Oceanography. 26:18-25. AbstractWebsite

Event-scale phenomena, of limited temporal duration or restricted spatial extent, often play a disproportionately large role in ecological processes occurring in the ocean water column. Nutrient and gas fluxes, upwelling and downwelling, transport of biogeochemically important elements, predator-prey interactions, and other processes may be markedly influenced by such events, which are inadequately resolved from infrequent ship surveys. The advent of autonomous instrumentation, including underwater gliders, profiling floats, surface drifters, enhanced moorings, coastal high-frequency radars, and satellite remote sensing, now provides the capability to resolve such phenomena and assess their role in structuring pelagic ecosystems. These methods are especially valuable when integrated together, and with shipboard calibration measurements and experimental programs.

Gonski, SF, Cai WJ, Ullman WJ, Joesoef A, Main CR, Pettay DT, Martz TR.  2018.  Assessment of the suitability of Durafet-based sensors for pH measurement in dynamic estuarine environments. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science. 200:152-168.   10.1016/j.ecss.2017.10.020   AbstractWebsite

The suitability of the Honeywell Durafet to the measurement of pH in productive, high-fouling, and highly-turbid estuarine environments was investigated at the confluence of the Murderkill Estuary and Delaware Bay (Delaware, USA). Three different flow configurations of the SeapHOx sensor equipped with a Honeywell Durafet and its integrated internal (Ag/AgCl reference electrode containing a 4.5 M KCl gel liquid junction) and external (solid-state chloride ion selective electrode, CI-ISE) reference electrodes were deployed for four periods between April 2015 and September 2016. In this environment, the Honeywell Durafet proved capable of making high-resolution and high-frequency pH measurements on the total scale between pH 6.8 and 8.4. Natural pH fluctuations of >1 pH unit were routinely captured over a range of timescales. The sensor pH collected between May and August 2016 using the most refined SeapHOx configuration exhibited good agreement with multiple sets of independently measured reference pH values. When deployed in conjunction with rigorous discrete sampling and calibration schemes, the sensor pH had a root-mean squared error ranging between 0.011 and 0.036 pH units across a wide range of salinity relative to both pH(T) calculated from measured dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity and pH(NBs) measured with a glass electrode corrected to pH(T) at in situ conditions. The present work demonstrates the viability of the Honeywell Durafet to the measurement of pH to within the weather-level precision defined by the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON, <= 0.02 pH units) as a part of future estuarine CO2 chemistry studies undertaken in dynamic environments. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Takeshita, Y, McGillis W, Briggs EM, Carter A, Donham E, Martz TR, Price NN, Smith JE.  2016.  Assessment of net community production and calcification of a coral reef using a boundary layer approach. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans.   10.1002/2016JC011886   Abstract
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Takeshita, Y, Johnson KS, Martz TR, Plant JN, Sarmiento JL.  2018.  Assessment of autonomous pH measurements for determining surface seawater partial pressure of CO2. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 123:4003-4013.   10.1029/2017jc013387   AbstractWebsite

The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) program currently operates >80 profiling floats equipped with pH sensors in the Southern Ocean. Theoretically, these floats have the potential to provide unique year-around estimates of pCO(2) derived from pH measurements. Here, we evaluate this approach in the field by comparing pCO(2) estimates from pH sensors to directly measured pCO(2). We first discuss data from a ship's underway system which covered a large range in temperature (2-30 degrees C) and salinity (33.6-36.5) over 43 days. This pH sensor utilizes the same sensing technology but with different packaging than those on SOCCOM floats. The mean residual varied between -4.64.1 and 8.64.0 (1 sigma) atm, depending on how the sensor was calibrated. However, the standard deviation of the residual, interpreted as the ability to track spatiotemporal variability, was consistently <5 atm and was independent of the calibration method. Second, we assessed the temporal stability of this approach by comparing pCO(2) estimated from four floats over 3 years to the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. Good agreement of -2.110.4 (1 sigma) mu atm was observed, with coherent seasonal cycles. These results demonstrate that pCO(2) estimates derived from profiling float pH measurements appear capable of reproducing spatiotemporal variations in surface pCO(2) measurements and should provide a powerful observational tool to complement current efforts to understand the seasonal to interannual variability of surface pCO(2) in underobserved regions of the open ocean.

Gray, SEC, DeGrandpre MD, Moore TS, Martz TR, Friederich GE, Johnson KS.  2011.  Applications of in situ pH measurements for inorganic carbon calculations. Marine Chemistry. 125:82-90.   10.1016/j.marchem.2011.02.005   AbstractWebsite

This study examines the utility of combining pH measurements with other inorganic carbon parameters for autonomous mooring-based carbon cycle research. Determination of the full suite of inorganic carbon species in the oceans has previously been restricted to ship-based studies. Now with the availability of autonomous sensors for pH and the partial pressure of CO(2) (pCO(2)), it is possible to characterize the inorganic carbon system on moorings and other unmanned platforms. The indicator-based pH instrument, SAMI-pH, was deployed with an autonomous equilibrator-infrared pCO(2) system in Monterey Bay. California USA from June to August 2007. The two-month time-series show a high degree of short-term variability, with pH and pCO(2) changing by as much as 0.32 pH units and 240 mu atm, respectively, during upwelling periods. The pH and salinity-derived alkalinity (A(Tsalin)) were used to calculate the other inorganic carbon parameters, including pCO(2), total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and CaCO(3) saturation states. The calculated pCO(2) was within 2 mu atm of the measured pCO(2) during the first day of the deployment and within 8 mu atm over the first month. The DIC calculated from pH-A-Ban and pCO(2)-A(Tsalin) were within 5 mu mol kg(-1) of each other during the first month. However, DIC calculated from pH-pCO(2) differed by similar to 50 mu mol kg(-1) from the other estimates over the same period, reflecting the sensitivity of the pH-pCO(2) calculation to measurement error. The data continued to diverge during the final month and this difference was likely driven by extensive biofouling. Because of the relative insensitivity of CO(3)(2-) concentration to these errors, aragonite saturation calculated from the pH-pCO(2) pair was within 0.15 of the pH-A(Tsalin) values over the entire deployment. These results show that in situ pH, when combined with other CO(2) parameters, can provide valuable insights into both data quality and inorganic carbon cycling. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Matson, PG, Washburn L, Martz TR, Hofmann GE.  2014.  Abiotic versus biotic drivers of ocean pH variation under fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Plos One. 9   10.1371/journal.pone.0107239   AbstractWebsite

Ocean acidification is expected to have a major effect on the marine carbonate system over the next century, particularly in high latitude seas. Less appreciated is natural environmental variation within these systems, particularly in terms of pH, and how this natural variation may inform laboratory experiments. In this study, we deployed sensor-equipped moorings at 20 m depths at three locations in McMurdo Sound, comprising deep (bottom depth>200 m: Hut Point Peninsula) and shallow environments (bottom depth similar to 25 m: Cape Evans and New Harbor). Our sensors recorded high-frequency variation in pH (Hut Point and Cape Evans only), tide (Cape Evans and New Harbor), and water mass properties (temperature and salinity) during spring and early summer 2011. These collective observations showed that (1) pH differed spatially both in terms of mean pH (Cape Evans: 8.009 +/- 0.015; Hut Point: 8.020 +/- 0.007) and range of pH (Cape Evans: 0.090; Hut Point: 0.036), and (2) pH was not related to the mixing of two water masses, suggesting that the observed pH variation is likely not driven by this abiotic process. Given the large daily fluctuation in pH at Cape Evans, we developed a simple mechanistic model to explore the potential for biotic processes - in this case algal photosynthesis - to increase pH by fixing carbon from the water column. For this model, we incorporated published photosynthetic parameters for the three dominant algal functional groups found at Cape Evans (benthic fleshy red macroalgae, crustose coralline algae, and sea ice algal communities) to estimate oxygen produced/carbon fixed from the water column underneath fast sea ice and the resulting pH change. These results suggest that biotic processes may be a primary driver of pH variation observed under fast sea ice at Cape Evans and potentially at other shallow sites in McMurdo Sound.