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2017
Takeshita, Y, Martz TR, Coletti LJ, Dickson AG, Jannasch HW, Johnson KS.  2017.  The effects of pressure on pH of Tris buffer in synthetic seawater. Marine Chemistry. 188:1-5.   10.1016/j.marchem.2016.11.002   AbstractWebsite

Equimolar Tris (2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol) buffer prepared in artificial seawater media is a widely accepted pH standard for oceanographic pH measurements, though its change in pH over pressure is largely unknown. The change in volume (Delta V) of dissociation reactions can be used to estimate the effects of pressure on the dissociation constant of weak acid and bases. The Delta V of Tris in seawater media of salinity 35 (Delta V-Tris*) was determined between 10 and 30 degrees C using potentiometry. The potentiometric cell consisted of a modified high pressure tolerant Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor pH sensor and a Chloride-Ion Selective Electrode directly exposed to solution. The effects of pressure on the potentiometric cell were quantified in aqueous HCl solution prior to measurements in Tris buffer. The experimentally determined Delta V-Tris* were fitted to the equation Delta V-Tris*= 4528 +0.04912t where t is temperature in Celsius; the resultant fit agreed to experimental data within uncertainty of the measurements, which was estimated to be 0.9 cm(-3) mol(-1). Using the results presented here, change in pH of Tris buffer due to pressure can be constrained to better than 0.003 at 200 bar, and can be expressed as: DpH(Tris) = -(4.528 + 0.04912t)p/ln(10)RT. where T is temperature in Kelvin, R is the universal gas constant (83.145 cm(3) bar K-1 mol(-1)), and Pis gauge pressure in bar. On average, pH of Tris buffer changes by approximately -0.02 at 200 bar. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2018
Takeshita, Y, Johnson KS, Martz TR, Plant JN, Sarmiento JL.  2018.  Assessment of autonomous pH measurements for determining surface seawater partial pressure of CO2. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 123:4003-4013.   10.1029/2017jc013387   AbstractWebsite

The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) program currently operates >80 profiling floats equipped with pH sensors in the Southern Ocean. Theoretically, these floats have the potential to provide unique year-around estimates of pCO(2) derived from pH measurements. Here, we evaluate this approach in the field by comparing pCO(2) estimates from pH sensors to directly measured pCO(2). We first discuss data from a ship's underway system which covered a large range in temperature (2-30 degrees C) and salinity (33.6-36.5) over 43 days. This pH sensor utilizes the same sensing technology but with different packaging than those on SOCCOM floats. The mean residual varied between -4.64.1 and 8.64.0 (1 sigma) atm, depending on how the sensor was calibrated. However, the standard deviation of the residual, interpreted as the ability to track spatiotemporal variability, was consistently <5 atm and was independent of the calibration method. Second, we assessed the temporal stability of this approach by comparing pCO(2) estimated from four floats over 3 years to the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. Good agreement of -2.110.4 (1 sigma) mu atm was observed, with coherent seasonal cycles. These results demonstrate that pCO(2) estimates derived from profiling float pH measurements appear capable of reproducing spatiotemporal variations in surface pCO(2) measurements and should provide a powerful observational tool to complement current efforts to understand the seasonal to interannual variability of surface pCO(2) in underobserved regions of the open ocean.