Publications

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2010
Martz, TR, Connery JG, Johnson KS.  2010.  Testing the Honeywell Durafet (R) for seawater pH applications. Limnology and Oceanography-Methods. 8:172-184.   10.4319/lom.2010.8.172   AbstractWebsite

We report on the first seawater tests at 1 atm of the Honeywell Durafet (R) pH sensor, a commercially available ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). Performance of this sensor was evaluated in a number of different situations including a temperature-controlled calibration vessel, the MBARI test tank, shipboard underway mapping, and a surface mooring. Many of these tests included a secondary reference electrode in addition to the internal reference supplied with the stock Durafet sensor. We present a theoretical overview of sensor response using both types of reference electrode. The Durafet sensor operates with a short term precision of +/- 0.0005 pH over periods of several hours and exhibits stability of better than 0.005 pH over periods of weeks to months. Our tests indicate that the Durafet pH sensor operates at a level of performance satisfactory for many types of biogeochemical studies at low pressure.

2016
Bresnahan, PJ, Wirth T, Martz TR, Andersson AJ, Cyronak T, D’Angelo S, Pennise J, Melville KW, Lenain L, Statom N.  2016.  A sensor package for mapping pH and oxygen from mobile platforms. Methods in Oceanography. 17:1-13.   http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mio.2016.04.004   AbstractWebsite

A novel chemical sensor package named “WavepHOx” was developed in order to facilitate measurement of surface ocean pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature from mobile platforms. The system comprises a Honeywell Durafet pH sensor, Aanderaa optode oxygen sensor, and chloride ion selective electrode, packaged into a hydrodynamic, lightweight housing. The WavepHOx has been deployed on a stand-up paddleboard and a Liquid Robotics Wave Glider in multiple near-shore settings in the Southern California Bight. Integration of the WavepHOx into these mobile platforms has enabled high spatiotemporal resolution pH and dissolved oxygen data collection. It is a particularly valuable tool for mapping shallow, fragile, or densely vegetated ecosystems which cannot be easily accessed by other platforms. Results from three surveys in San Diego, California, are reported. We show pH and dissolved oxygen variability >0.3 and >50% saturation, respectively, over tens to hundreds of meters to highlight the degree of natural spatial variability in these vegetated ecosystems. When deployed during an extensive discrete sampling program, the WavepHOx pH had a root mean squared error of 0.028 relative to pH calculated from fifty six measurements of total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon, confirming its capacity for accurate, high spatiotemporal resolution data collection.

2017
Takeshita, Y, Martz TR, Coletti LJ, Dickson AG, Jannasch HW, Johnson KS.  2017.  The effects of pressure on pH of Tris buffer in synthetic seawater. Marine Chemistry. 188:1-5.   10.1016/j.marchem.2016.11.002   AbstractWebsite

Equimolar Tris (2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol) buffer prepared in artificial seawater media is a widely accepted pH standard for oceanographic pH measurements, though its change in pH over pressure is largely unknown. The change in volume (Delta V) of dissociation reactions can be used to estimate the effects of pressure on the dissociation constant of weak acid and bases. The Delta V of Tris in seawater media of salinity 35 (Delta V-Tris*) was determined between 10 and 30 degrees C using potentiometry. The potentiometric cell consisted of a modified high pressure tolerant Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor pH sensor and a Chloride-Ion Selective Electrode directly exposed to solution. The effects of pressure on the potentiometric cell were quantified in aqueous HCl solution prior to measurements in Tris buffer. The experimentally determined Delta V-Tris* were fitted to the equation Delta V-Tris*= 4528 +0.04912t where t is temperature in Celsius; the resultant fit agreed to experimental data within uncertainty of the measurements, which was estimated to be 0.9 cm(-3) mol(-1). Using the results presented here, change in pH of Tris buffer due to pressure can be constrained to better than 0.003 at 200 bar, and can be expressed as: DpH(Tris) = -(4.528 + 0.04912t)p/ln(10)RT. where T is temperature in Kelvin, R is the universal gas constant (83.145 cm(3) bar K-1 mol(-1)), and Pis gauge pressure in bar. On average, pH of Tris buffer changes by approximately -0.02 at 200 bar. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Briggs, EM, Sandoval S, Erten A, Takeshita Y, Kummel AC, Martz TR.  2017.  Solid State Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Total Alkalinity and pH of Seawater. Acs Sensors. 2:1302-1309.   10.1021/acssensors.7b00305   AbstractWebsite

A novel design is demonstrated for a solid state, reagent-less sensor capable of rapid and simultaneous measurement of pH and Total Alkalinity (A(T)) using ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) technology to provide a simplified means of characterization of the aqueous carbon dioxide system through measurement of two "master variables": pH and A(T). ISFET-based pH sensors that achieve 0.001 precision are widely used in various oceanographic applications. A modified ISFET is demonstrated to perform a nanoliter-scale acid base titration of A(T) in under 40 s. This method of measuring A(T), a Coulometric Diffusion Titration, involves electrolytic generation of titrant, through the electrolysis of water on the surface of the chip via a microfabricated electrode eliminating the requirement of external reagents. Characterization has been performed in seawater as well as titrating individual components (i.e., OH-, HCO3-, B(OH)(4)(-), PO43-) of seawater A(T). The seawater measurements are consistent with the design in reaching the benchmark goal of 0.5% precision in A(T) over the range of seawater A(T) of similar to 2200-2500 mu mol kg(-1) which demonstrates great potential for autonomous sensing.

2018
Gonski, SF, Cai WJ, Ullman WJ, Joesoef A, Main CR, Pettay DT, Martz TR.  2018.  Assessment of the suitability of Durafet-based sensors for pH measurement in dynamic estuarine environments. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science. 200:152-168.   10.1016/j.ecss.2017.10.020   AbstractWebsite

The suitability of the Honeywell Durafet to the measurement of pH in productive, high-fouling, and highly-turbid estuarine environments was investigated at the confluence of the Murderkill Estuary and Delaware Bay (Delaware, USA). Three different flow configurations of the SeapHOx sensor equipped with a Honeywell Durafet and its integrated internal (Ag/AgCl reference electrode containing a 4.5 M KCl gel liquid junction) and external (solid-state chloride ion selective electrode, CI-ISE) reference electrodes were deployed for four periods between April 2015 and September 2016. In this environment, the Honeywell Durafet proved capable of making high-resolution and high-frequency pH measurements on the total scale between pH 6.8 and 8.4. Natural pH fluctuations of >1 pH unit were routinely captured over a range of timescales. The sensor pH collected between May and August 2016 using the most refined SeapHOx configuration exhibited good agreement with multiple sets of independently measured reference pH values. When deployed in conjunction with rigorous discrete sampling and calibration schemes, the sensor pH had a root-mean squared error ranging between 0.011 and 0.036 pH units across a wide range of salinity relative to both pH(T) calculated from measured dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity and pH(NBs) measured with a glass electrode corrected to pH(T) at in situ conditions. The present work demonstrates the viability of the Honeywell Durafet to the measurement of pH to within the weather-level precision defined by the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON, <= 0.02 pH units) as a part of future estuarine CO2 chemistry studies undertaken in dynamic environments. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Takeshita, Y, Johnson KS, Martz TR, Plant JN, Sarmiento JL.  2018.  Assessment of autonomous pH measurements for determining surface seawater partial pressure of CO2. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 123:4003-4013.   10.1029/2017jc013387   AbstractWebsite

The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) program currently operates >80 profiling floats equipped with pH sensors in the Southern Ocean. Theoretically, these floats have the potential to provide unique year-around estimates of pCO(2) derived from pH measurements. Here, we evaluate this approach in the field by comparing pCO(2) estimates from pH sensors to directly measured pCO(2). We first discuss data from a ship's underway system which covered a large range in temperature (2-30 degrees C) and salinity (33.6-36.5) over 43 days. This pH sensor utilizes the same sensing technology but with different packaging than those on SOCCOM floats. The mean residual varied between -4.64.1 and 8.64.0 (1 sigma) atm, depending on how the sensor was calibrated. However, the standard deviation of the residual, interpreted as the ability to track spatiotemporal variability, was consistently <5 atm and was independent of the calibration method. Second, we assessed the temporal stability of this approach by comparing pCO(2) estimated from four floats over 3 years to the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. Good agreement of -2.110.4 (1 sigma) mu atm was observed, with coherent seasonal cycles. These results demonstrate that pCO(2) estimates derived from profiling float pH measurements appear capable of reproducing spatiotemporal variations in surface pCO(2) measurements and should provide a powerful observational tool to complement current efforts to understand the seasonal to interannual variability of surface pCO(2) in underobserved regions of the open ocean.