Publications

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2014
Martz, T, Send U, Ohman MD, Takeshita Y, Bresnahan P, Kim HJ, Nam S.  2014.  Dynamic variability of biogeochemical ratios in the Southern California Current System. Geophysical Research Letters. 41:2496-2501.   10.1002/2014gl059332   AbstractWebsite

We use autonomous nitrate (NO3-), oxygen (O-2), and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) observations to examine the relationship between ratios of C:N:O at an upwelling site in the Southern California Current System. Mean ratios and 95% confidence intervals observed by sensors over 8 months were NO3-:O-2=-0.110.002, NO3-:DIC=0.140.001, and DIC:O-2=-0.830.01, in good agreement with Redfield ratios. Variability in the ratios on the weekly time scale is attributable to shifts in biological demand and nutrient availability and shown to exhibit a spectrum of values ranging from near 100% New Production to 100% Regenerated Production.

2013
Takeshita, Y, Martz TR, Johnson KS, Plant JN, Gilbert D, Riser SC, Neill C, Tilbrook B.  2013.  A climatology-based quality control procedure for profiling float oxygen data. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 118:5640-5650.   10.1002/jgrc.20399   AbstractWebsite

Over 450 Argo profiling floats equipped with oxygen sensors have been deployed, but no quality control (QC) protocols have been adopted by the oceanographic community for use by Argo data centers. As a consequence, the growing float oxygen data set as a whole is not readily utilized for many types of biogeochemical studies. Here we present a simple procedure that can be used to correct first-order errors (offset and drift) in profiling float oxygen data by comparing float data to a monthly climatology (World Ocean Atlas 2009). Float specific correction terms for the entire array were calculated. This QC procedure was evaluated by (1) comparing the climatology-derived correction coefficients to those derived from discrete samples for 14 floats and (2) comparing correction coefficients for seven floats that had been calibrated twice prior to deployment (once in the factory and once in-house), with the second calibration ostensibly more accurate than the first. The corrections presented here constrain most float oxygen measurements to better than 3% at the surface.

2009
Martz, TR, Jannasch HW, Johnson KS.  2009.  Determination of carbonate ion concentration and inner sphere carbonate ion pairs in seawater by ultraviolet spectrophotometric titration. Marine Chemistry. 115:145-154.   10.1016/j.marchem.2009.07.002   AbstractWebsite

We describe a novel method for determination of carbonate ion concentration in seawater by acidimetric titration with UV detection. Because CO(3)(2-) absorbs light at wavelengths of less than similar to 250 nm, it is feasible to titrate most carbonate-containing natural waters with acid and observe an increase in %Transmittance. The observed signal is proportional to the concentration of carbonate ion in the original sample. Present technology permits a theoretical precision in the determination of [CO(3)(2-)] in natural seawater background of similar to 0.5% (at 10 cm pathlength, 200 mu M CO(3)(2-), +/- 0.0001 AU). The procedure has been tested at 1 and 10 cm pathlengths using single and multipoint titration methods, respectively. Results using natural seawater test solutions indicate a resolution in [CO(3)(2-)] of 3.6% in a standard I cm cuvette using a very simple manual method, and 0.7% using a custom-built 10 cm closed titration cell. Estimates of the relative distribution of CO(3)(2-) between inner and outer sphere complexes with Mg(2+) and Na(+) were also determined and the equilibrium constants agree with published values. This method provides a new tool for studies of several fundamental aspects CO(2) chemistry, including the second dissociation constant of carbonic acid, CO(3)(2-) ion pairing, and can be used to directly measure the distribution of carbonate ion in seawater and many other types of natural waters. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.