Publications

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2017
Takeshita, Y, Martz TR, Coletti LJ, Dickson AG, Jannasch HW, Johnson KS.  2017.  The effects of pressure on pH of Tris buffer in synthetic seawater. Marine Chemistry. 188:1-5.   10.1016/j.marchem.2016.11.002   AbstractWebsite

Equimolar Tris (2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol) buffer prepared in artificial seawater media is a widely accepted pH standard for oceanographic pH measurements, though its change in pH over pressure is largely unknown. The change in volume (Delta V) of dissociation reactions can be used to estimate the effects of pressure on the dissociation constant of weak acid and bases. The Delta V of Tris in seawater media of salinity 35 (Delta V-Tris*) was determined between 10 and 30 degrees C using potentiometry. The potentiometric cell consisted of a modified high pressure tolerant Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor pH sensor and a Chloride-Ion Selective Electrode directly exposed to solution. The effects of pressure on the potentiometric cell were quantified in aqueous HCl solution prior to measurements in Tris buffer. The experimentally determined Delta V-Tris* were fitted to the equation Delta V-Tris*= 4528 +0.04912t where t is temperature in Celsius; the resultant fit agreed to experimental data within uncertainty of the measurements, which was estimated to be 0.9 cm(-3) mol(-1). Using the results presented here, change in pH of Tris buffer due to pressure can be constrained to better than 0.003 at 200 bar, and can be expressed as: DpH(Tris) = -(4.528 + 0.04912t)p/ln(10)RT. where T is temperature in Kelvin, R is the universal gas constant (83.145 cm(3) bar K-1 mol(-1)), and Pis gauge pressure in bar. On average, pH of Tris buffer changes by approximately -0.02 at 200 bar. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2016
Johnson, KS, Jannasch HW, Coletti LJ, Elrod VA, Martz TR, Takeshita Y, Carlson RJ, Connery JG.  2016.  Deep-Sea DuraFET: A Pressure Tolerant pH Sensor Designed for Global Sensor Networks. Analytical Chemistry. 88:3249-3256.   10.1021/acs.analchem.5b04653   AbstractWebsite

Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide is driving a long-term decrease in ocean pH which is superimposed on daily to seasonal variability. These changes impact ecosystem processes, and they serve as a record of ecosystem metabolism. However, the temporal variability in pH is observed at only a few locations in the ocean because a ship is required to support pH observations of sufficient precision and accuracy. This paper describes a pressure tolerant Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor pH sensor that is based on the Honeywell Durafet ISFET die. When combined with a AgCl pseudoreference sensor that is immersed directly in seawater, the system is capable of operating for years at a time on platforms that cycle from depths of several km to the surface. The paper also describes the calibration scheme developed to allow calibrated pH measurements to be derived from the activity of HCl reported by the sensor system over the range of ocean pressure and temperature. Deployments on vertical profiling platforms enable self-calibration in deep waters where pH values are stable. Measurements with the sensor indicate that it is capable of reporting pH with an accuracy of 0.01 or better on the total proton scale and a precision over multiyear periods of 0.005. This system enables a global ocean observing system for ocean pH.

2015
Nam, S, Takeshita Y, Frieder CA, Martz T, Ballard J.  2015.  Seasonal advection of Pacific Equatorial Water alters oxygen and pH in the Southern California Bight. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 120:5387-5399.   10.1002/2015jc010859   AbstractWebsite

Chemical properties of the California Undercurrent (CU) have been changing over the past several decades, yet the mechanisms responsible for the trend are still not fully understood. We present a survey of temperature, salinity, O-2, pH, and currents at intermediate depths (defined here as 50-500 m) in the summer (30 June to 10 July) and winter (8-15 December) of 2012 in the southern region of the Southern California Bight. Observations of temperature, salinity, and currents reveal that local bathymetry and small gyres play an important role in the flow path of the California Undercurrent (CU). Using spiciness (p) as a tracer, we observe a 10% increase of Pacific Equatorial Water (PEW) in the core of the CU during the summer versus the winter. This is associated with an increase in p of 0.2, and a decrease in O-2 and pH of 30 mu mol kg(-1) and 0.022, respectively; the change in pH is driven by increased CO2, while total alkalinity remains unchanged. The high-p, low-O-2, and low-pH waters during the summer are not distributed uniformly in the study region. Moreover, mooring observations at the edge of the continental shelf reveal intermittent intrusions of PEW onto the shelf with concomitant decreases in O-2 and pH. We estimate that increased advection of PEW in the CU could account for approximately 50% of the observed decrease in O-2, and between 49 and 73% of the decrease in pH, over the past three decades.

2011
Matson, PG, Martz TR, Hofmann GE.  2011.  High-frequency observations of pH under Antarctic sea ice in the southern Ross Sea. Antarctic Science. 23:607-613.   10.1017/s0954102011000551   AbstractWebsite

Although predictions suggest that ocean acidification will significantly impact polar oceans within 20-30 years, there is limited information regarding present-day pH dynamics of the Southern Ocean. Here, we present novel high-frequency observations of pH collected during spring of 2010 using SeaFET pH sensors at three locations under fast sea ice in the southern Ross Sea. During these deployments in McMurdo Sound, baseline pH ranged between 8.019-8.045, with low to moderate overall variation (0.043-0.114 units) on the scale of hours to days. The variation was predominantly in the direction of increased pH relative to baseline observations. Estimates of aragonite saturation state (Omega(Ar)) were > 1 with no observations of subsaturation. Time series records such as these are significant to the Antarctic science community; this information can be leveraged towards framing more environmentally relevant laboratory experiments aimed at assessing the vulnerability of Antarctic species to ocean acidification. In addition, increased spatial and temporal coverage of pH datasets may reveal ecologically significant patterns. Specifically, whether such variation in natural ocean pH dynamics may drive local adaptation to pH variation or provide refugia for populations of marine calcifiers in a future, acidifying ocean.

Yu, PC, Matson PG, Martz TR, Hofmann GE.  2011.  The ocean acidification seascape and its relationship to the performance of calcifying marine invertebrates: Laboratory experiments on the development of urchin larvae framed by environmentally-relevant pCO(2)/pH. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 400:288-295.   10.1016/j.jembe.2011.02.016   AbstractWebsite

Variation in ocean pH is a dynamic process occurring naturally in the upwelling zone of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. The nearshore carbonate chemistry is under-characterized and the physiology of local organisms may be under constant challenge from cyclical changes in pH and carbonate ion concentration of unexpectedly high magnitude. We looked to environmental pH conditions of coastal upwelling and used those values to examine effects of low pH on 4-arm larvae of purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We deployed a pH sensor at a nearshore shallow benthic site for 3 weeks during summer 2010 to assess the changes in pH in the Santa Barbara Channel, a region considered to have relatively less intense upwelling along the US Pacific Coast. Large fluctuations in pH of up to 0.67 pH units were observed over short time scales of several days. Daily pH fluctuations on a tidal pattern followed temperature fluctuations over short time scales, but not over scales greater than a day. The lowest pH values recorded (similar to 7.70) are lower than some of those pH values predicted to occur in surface oceans at the end of the century. In the context of this dynamic pH exposure, larvae were raised at elevated pCO(2) levels of 1000 ppm and 1450 ppm CO(2) (pH 7.7 and 7.5 respectively) and measured for total larval length (from the spicule tip of the postoral arm to the spicule tip of the aboral point) along the spicules, to assess effects of low pH upwelling water on morphology. Larvae in all treatments maintained normal development and developmental schedule to day 6, and did not exhibit significant differences in larval asymmetry between treatments. At day 3 and day 6, larvae in the 1450 ppm CO(2) treatment were significantly smaller (p<0.001) than the control larvae by only 7-13%. The observation of smaller larvae raised under high pCO(2) has an as yet undetermined physiological mechanism, but has implications for locomotion and feeding. These effects of small magnitude in these urchin larvae are indicative of a potential resilience to near-future levels of ocean acidification. Using environmental monitoring of pH to inform experimental parameters provides a means to improve our understanding of acclimatization of organisms in a dynamic ecosystem. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.