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Benmarhnia, T, Rey L, Cartier Y, Clary CM, Deguen S, Brousselle A.  2014.  Addressing equity in interventions to reduce air pollution in urban areas: a systematic review. International Journal of Public Health. 59:933-944.   10.1007/s00038-014-0608-0   AbstractWebsite

Integration of equity in evidence-based public health is a great challenge nowadays. In this review we draw attention to the importance of considering equity in air pollution interventions. We also propose further methodological and theoretical challenges when assessing equity in interventions to reduce air pollution and we present opportunities to develop this research area.

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Benmarhnia, T, Oulhote Y, Petit C, Lapostolle A, Chauvin P, Zmirou-Navier D, Deguen S.  2014.  Chronic air pollution and social deprivation as modifiers of the association between high temperature and daily mortality. Environmental Health. 13   Artn 5310.1186/1476-069x-13-53   AbstractWebsite

Background: Heat and air pollution are both associated with increases in mortality. However, the interactive effect of temperature and air pollution on mortality remains unsettled. Similarly, the relationship between air pollution, air temperature, and social deprivation has never been explored.Methods: We used daily mortality data from 2004 to 2009, daily mean temperature variables and relative humidity, for Paris, France. Estimates of chronic exposure to air pollution and social deprivation at a small spatial scale were calculated and split into three strata. We developed a stratified Poisson regression models to assess daily temperature and mortality associations, and tested the heterogeneity of the regression coefficients of the different strata. Deaths due to ambient temperature were calculated from attributable fractions and mortality rates were estimated.Results: We found that chronic air pollution exposure and social deprivation are effect modifiers of the association between daily temperature and mortality. We found a potential interactive effect between social deprivation and chronic exposure with regards to air pollution in the mortality-temperature relationship.Conclusion: Our results may have implications in considering chronically polluted areas as vulnerable in heat action plans and in the long-term measures to reduce the burden of heat stress especially in the context of climate change.

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Wang, Q, Benmarhnia T, Zhang HH, Knibbs LD, Sheridan P, Li CC, Bao JZ, Ren M, Wang SH, He YL, Zhang YW, Zhao QG, Huang CR.  2018.  Identifying windows of susceptibility for maternal exposure to ambient air pollution and preterm birth. Environment International. 121:317-324.   10.1016/j.envint.2018.09.021   AbstractWebsite

Maternal exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with preterm birth (PTB), however, entire pregnancy or trimester-specific associations were generally reported, which may not sufficiently identify windows of susceptibility. Using birth registry data from Guangzhou, a megacity of southern China (population -14.5 million), including 469,975 singleton live births between January 2015 and July 2017, we assessed the association between weekly air pollution exposure and PTB in a retrospective cohort study. Daily average concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, NO2, SO2, and O-3 from 11 monitoring stations were used to estimate district-specific exposures for each participant based on their district residency during pregnancy. Distributed lag models (DLMs) incorporating Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the association between weekly maternal exposure to air pollutant and PTB risk (as a time-to-event outcome), after controlling for temperature, seasonally, and individual-level covariates. We also considered moderate PTB (32-36 gestational weeks) and very PTB (28-31 gestational weeks) as outcomes of interest. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidential intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for an interquartile range (IQR) increase in air pollutants during the study period. An IQR increase in PM2.5 exposure during the 20th to 28th gestational weeks (27.0 mu g/m(3)) was significantly associated with PTB risk, with the strongest effect in the 25th week (HR = 1.034, 95% CI:1.010-1.059). The significant exposure windows were the 19th-28th weeks for PM10, the 18th-31st weeks for NO2, and the 23rd-31A weeks for O-3, respectively. The strongest associations were observed in the 25th week for PM10 (IQR = 37.0 mu g/m(3); HR = 1.048, 95% CI:1.034-1.062), the 26th week for NO2 (IQR = 29.0 mu g/m(3); HR = 1.060, 95% CI:1.028-1.094), and in the 28th week for O-3 (IQR = 90.0 mu g/m(3); HR = 1.063, 95% CI:1.046-1.081). Similar patterns were observed for moderate PTB (32-36 gestational weeks) and very PTB (28-31 gestational weeks) for PM2.5, PM10, NO2 exposure, but the effects were greater for very PTB. We did not observe any association between pregnancy SO2 exposure and the risk of PTB. Our results suggest that middle to late pregnancy is the most susceptible air pollution exposure window for air pollution and PTB among women in Guangzhou, China.

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Wang, Q, Benmarhnia T, Li CC, Knibbs LD, Bao JZ, Ren M, Zhang HH, Wang SH, Zhang YW, Zhao QG, Huang CR.  2019.  Seasonal analyses of the association between prenatal ambient air pollution exposure and birth weight for gestational age in Guangzhou, China. Science of the Total Environment. 649:526-534.   10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.303   AbstractWebsite

Ambient air pollution has been linked to small for gestational age (SGA); however, the relationship with large for gestational age (ILA) is unclear and very few studies have investigated seasonal effects on the association between air pollution and SGA or LGA. Using birth registry data of 506,000 singleton live births from 11 districts in Guangzhou, China between January 2015 and July 2017, we examined associations between ambient air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, NO2, SO2, and O-3) and SGA/LGA, and further assessed the modification effect of season. Daily concentrations of air pollutants from 11 monitoring stations were used to estimate district-specific exposures for each participant based on their district of residence during pregnancy. Two-level binary logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between air pollution and SGA/LGA. Stratified analyses by season and a Cochran Q test were performed to assess the modification of season. Exposure to PM2.5, NO2, SO2, and O-3 was significantly associated with increased risk of SGA, especially for exposure during the second and trimester. For an interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM2.5(6.5 mu g/m(3)), NO2 (12.7 mu g/m(3)), SO2 (2.8 mu g/m(3)) and O-3 (20.8 mu g/m(3)) during the entire pregnancy, SGA risk increased by 2% (OR - 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00-1.04), 8% (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.12), 2% (OR - 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03), and 14% (1.14, 1.11-1.17), respectively. A decreased risk of WA was found for PM2.5, PM10, SO2, and O-3 during the first trimester or entire pregnancy. When examined by season, significant associations between air pollutants and SGA were observed for women who conceived during summer or fall, and the patterns were consistent for all pollutants. Our study suggests that conception during different seasons might modify the association between ambient air pollution and SGA. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Benmarhnia, T, Kihal-Talantikite W, Ragettli MS, Deguen S.  2017.  Small-area spatiotemporal analysis of heatwave impacts on elderly mortality in Paris: A cluster analysis approach. Science of the Total Environment. 592:288-294.   10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.03.102   AbstractWebsite

Background: Heat-waves have a substantial public health burden. Understanding spatial heterogeneity at a fine spatial scale in relation to heat and related mortality is central to target interventions towards vulnerable communities. Objectives: To determine the spatial variability of heat-wave-related mortality risk among elderly in Paris, France at the census block level. We also aimed to assess area-level social and environmental determinants of high mortality risk within Paris. Methods: We used daily mortality data from 2004 to 2009 among people aged >65 at the French census block level within Paris. We used two heat wave days' definitions that were compared to non-heat wave days. A Bernoulli cluster analysis method was applied to identify high risk clusters of mortality during heat waves. We performed random effects meta-regression analyses to investigate factors associated with the magnitude of the mortality risk. Results: The spatial approach revealed a spatial aggregation of death cases during heat wave days. We found that small scale chronic PM10 exposure was associated with a 0.02 (95% CI: 0.001; 0.045) increase of the risk of dying during a heat wave episode. We also found a positive association with the percentage of foreigners and the percentage of labor force, while the proportion of elderly people living in the neighborhoodwas negatively associated. We also found that green space density had a protective effect and inversely that the density of constructed feature increased the risk of dying during a heat wave episode. Conclusion: We showed that a spatial variation in terms of heat-related vulnerability exists within Paris and that it can be explained by some contextual factors. This study can be useful for designing interventions targeting more vulnerable areas and reduce the burden of heat waves. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Cartier, Y, Benmarhnia T, Brousselle A.  2015.  Tool for assessing health and equity impacts of interventions modifying air quality in urban environments. Evaluation and Program Planning. 53:1-9.   10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2015.07.004   AbstractWebsite

Background: Urban outdoor air pollution (AP) is a major public health concern but the mechanisms by which interventions impact health and social inequities are rarely assessed. Health and equity impacts of policies and interventions are questioned, but managers and policy agents in various institutional contexts have very few practical tools to help them better orient interventions in sectors other than the health sector. Our objective was to create such a tool to facilitate the assessment of health impacts of urban outdoor AP interventions by non-public health experts.Methods: An iterative process of reviewing the academic literature, brainstorming, and consultation with experts was used to identify the chain of effects of urban outdoor AP and the major modifying factors. To test its applicability, the tool was applied to two interventions, the London Low Emission Zone and the Montreal BIXI public bicycle-sharing program.Results: We identify the chain of effects, six categories of modifying factors: those controlling the source of emissions, the quantity of emissions, concentrations of emitted pollutants, their spatial distribution, personal exposure, and individual vulnerability. Modifiable and non-modifiable factors are also identified. Results are presented in the text but also graphically, as we wanted it to be a practical tool, from pollution sources to emission, exposure, and finally, health effects.Conclusion: The tool represents a practical first step to assessing AP-related interventions for health and equity impacts. Understanding how different factors affect health and equity through air pollution can provide insight to city policymakers pursuing Health in All Policies. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.