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Small, RJ, Richards KJ, Xie SP, Dutrieux P, Miyama T.  2009.  Damping of Tropical Instability Waves caused by the action of surface currents on stress. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 114   10.1029/2008jc005147   Abstract
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Liu, W, Lu J, Leung LR, Xie SP, Liu ZY, Zhu J.  2015.  The de-correlation of westerly winds and westerly-wind stress over the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum. Climate Dynamics. 45:3157-3168.   10.1007/s00382-015-2530-4   AbstractWebsite

Motivated by indications from paleo-evidence, this paper investigates the changes of the Southern Westerly Winds (SWW) and westerly-wind stress between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and pre-industrial in the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations, highlighting the role of Antarctic sea ice in modulating the wind effect on ocean. Particularly, a de-correlation occurs between the changes in SWW and westerly-wind stress, caused primarily by an equatorward expansion of winter Antarctic sea ice that undermines the efficacy of wind in generating stress over the liquid ocean. Such de-correlation may reflect the LGM condition in reality, in view of the fact that the model which simulates this condition has most fidelity in simulating modern SWW and Antarctic sea ice. Therein two models stand out for their agreements with paleo-evidence regarding the change of SWW and the westerly-wind stress. They simulate strengthened and poleward-migrated LGM SWW in the atmosphere, consistent with the indications from dust records. Whilst in the ocean, they well capture an equatorward-shifted pattern of the observed oceanic front shift, with most pronounced equatorward-shifted westerly wind stress during the LGM.

Feng, M, Hendon HH, Xie SP, Marshall AG, Schiller A, Kosaka Y, Caputi N, Pearce A.  2015.  Decadal increase in Ningaloo Nino since the late 1990s. Geophysical Research Letters. 42:104-112.   10.1002/2014gl062509   AbstractWebsite

Ningaloo Nino refers to the episodic occurrence of anomalously warm ocean conditions along the subtropical coast of Western Australia (WA). Ningaloo Nino typically develops in austral spring, peaks in summer, and decays in autumn, and it often occurs in conjunction with La Nina conditions in the Pacific which promote poleward transport of warm tropical waters by the Leeuwin Current. Since the late 1990s, there has been a marked increase in the occurrence of Ningaloo Nino, which is likely related to the recent swing to the negative phase of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) and enhanced El Nino-Southern Oscillation variance since 1970s. The swing to the negative IPO sustains positive heat content anomalies and initiates more frequent cyclonic wind anomalies off the WA coast so favoring enhanced poleward heat transport by the Leeuwin Current. The anthropogenically forced global warming has made it easier for natural variability to drive extreme ocean temperatures in the region.

Dai, A, Fyfe JC, Xie S-P, Dai X.  2015.  Decadal modulation of global surface temperature by internal climate variability. Nature Clim. Change. advance online publication: Nature Publishing Group   10.1038/nclimate2605   Abstract

Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernible warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations, which on average project strong warming1, 2, 3. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific1, 4, 5, intensifying trade winds5, changes in El Niño activity6, 7, increasing volcanic activity8, 9, 10 and decreasing solar irradiance7. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyse observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called ‘hiatus’ period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from those associated with GHG-induced warming or aerosol-induced cooling. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

Xie, S-P, Du Y, Huang G, Zheng X-T, Tokinaga H, Hu K, Liu Q.  2010.  Decadal Shift in El Nino Influences on Indo-Western Pacific and East Asian Climate in the 1970s. Journal of Climate. 23:3352-3368.   10.1175/2010jcli3429.1   Abstract
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Taguchi, B, Qiu B, Nonaka M, Sasaki H, Xie S-P, Schneider N.  2010.  Decadal variability of the Kuroshio Extension: mesoscale eddies and recirculations. Ocean Dynamics. 60:673-691.   10.1007/s10236-010-0295-1   Abstract
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Taguchi, B, Xie SP, Schneider N, Nonaka M, Sasaki H, Sasai Y.  2007.  Decadal variability of the Kuroshio Extension: Observations and an eddy-resolving model hindcast. Journal of Climate. 20:2357-2377.   10.1175/jcli4142.1   Abstract
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Nonaka, M, Xie SP, McCreary JP.  2002.  Decadal variations in the subtropical cells and equatorial pacific SST. Geophysical Research Letters. 29   10.1029/2001gl013717   Abstract
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Li, JB, Xie SP, Cook ER, Chen FH, Shi JF, Zhang DD, Fang KY, Gou XH, Li T, Peng JF, Shi SY, Zhao YS.  2019.  Deciphering human contributions to Yellow River flow reductions and downstream drying using centuries-long tree ring records. Geophysical Research Letters. 46:898-905.   10.1029/2018gl081090   AbstractWebsite

The Yellow River flow has decreased substantially in recent decades, and the river often dried up in the lower reach and failed to reach the sea. Climate change and human disruption have been suggested as major causes of the flow reduction, but quantification of their relative contribution is challenging due to limited instrumental records and disturbance by dams. Here we use a basin-wide tree ring network to reconstruct the Yellow River flow for the past 1,200 years and show that the flow exhibits marked amplitude variations that are closely coupled to the hydrological mean state swings at multidecadal to centennial timescales. Recent flow should have increased to the highest level of the past 1,200 years if there were no human disruption. However, human activities have caused a loss of nearly half of natural flow since the late 1960s and are the main culprit for recent downstream flow reduction. Plain Language Summary Recent Yellow River flow reductions have had major impacts on China's economy and water policy. The short and heavily human-modified gauge records are unable to reveal natural flow variability now and in the past. Here we use tree rings to reconstruct long-term Yellow River flow, which enables an assessment of natural flow variability and the detection of human contributions to recent flow reductions. Our 1,200-year reconstruction reveals that under natural conditions the Yellow River flow should have increased markedly since the early twentieth century. However, the observed flow decreased since the late 1960s and such a decrease must be predominately caused by human interventions instead of climate change.

Kobashi, F, Xie SP, Iwasaka N, Sakamoto TT.  2008.  Deep Atmospheric Response to the North Pacific Oceanic Subtropical Front in Spring. Journal of Climate. 21:5960-5975.   10.1175/2008jcli2311.1   Abstract
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Xu, H, Xu M, Xie S-P, Wang Y.  2011.  Deep Atmospheric Response to the Spring Kuroshio over the East China Sea. Journal of Climate. 24:4959-4972.   10.1175/jcli-d-10-05034.1   Abstract
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Wang, G, Xie S-P, Qu T, Huang RX.  2011.  Deep South China Sea circulation. Geophysical Research Letters. 38   10.1029/2010gl046626   Abstract
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Kang, SM, Xie SP.  2014.  Dependence of climate response on meridional structure of external thermal forcing. Journal of Climate. 27:5593-5600.   10.1175/jcli-d-13-00622.1   AbstractWebsite

This study shows that the magnitude of global surface warming greatly depends on the meridional distribution of surface thermal forcing. An atmospheric model coupled to an aquaplanet slab mixed layer ocean is perturbed by prescribing heating to the ocean mixed layer. The heating is distributed uniformly globally or confined to narrow tropical or polar bands, and the amplitude is adjusted to ensure that the global mean remains the same for all cases. Since the tropical temperature is close to a moist adiabat, the prescribed heating leads to a maximized warming near the tropopause, whereas the polar warming is trapped near the surface because of strong atmospheric stability. Hence, the surface warming is more effectively damped by radiation in the tropics than in the polar region. As a result, the global surface temperature increase is weak (strong) when the given amount of heating is confined to the tropical (polar) band. The degree of this contrast is shown to depend on water vapor- and cloud-radiative feedbacks that alter the effective strength of prescribed thermal forcing.

Wang, H, Xie SP, Tokinaga H, Liu Q, Kosaka Y.  2016.  Detecting cross-equatorial wind change as a fingerprint of climate response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Geophysical Research Letters. 43:3444-3450.   10.1002/2016gl068521   AbstractWebsite

Anthropogenic aerosols are amajor driver of the twetieth century climate change. In climate models, the aerosol forcing, larger in the Northern than Southern Hemispheres, induces an interhemispheric Hadley circulation. In support of the model result, we detected a robust change in the zonal mean cross-equatorial wind over the past 60 years from ship observations and reanalyses, accompanied by physically consistent changes in atmospheric pressure and marine cloud cover. Single-forcing experiments indicate that the observed change in cross-equatorial wind is a fingerprint of aerosol forcing. This zonal mean mode follows the evolution of global aerosol forcing that is distinct from regional changes in the Atlantic sector. Atmospheric simulations successfully reproduce this interhemispheric mode, indicating the importance of sea surface temperature mediation in response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. As societies awaken to reduce aerosol emissions, a phase reversal of this interhemispheric mode is expected in the 21st century.

Shu, W, Lixin W, Qinyu L, Xie S-P.  2010.  Development processes of the Tropical Pacific Meridional Mode. Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. 27:95-99.   10.1007/s00376-009-8067-x   Abstract
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Hashizume, H, Xie SP, Fujiwara M, Shiotani M, Watanabe T, Tanimoto Y, Liu WT, Takeuchi K.  2002.  Direct observations of atmospheric boundary layer response to SST variations associated with tropical instability waves over the eastern equatorial Pacific. Journal of Climate. 15:3379-3393. Abstract
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Xie, SP, Kosaka Y, Okumura YM.  2016.  Distinct energy budgets for anthropogenic and natural changes during global warming hiatus. Nature Geoscience. 9:29-+.   10.1038/ngeo2581   AbstractWebsite

The Earth's energy budget for the past four decades can now be closed(1), and it supports anthropogenic greenhouse forcing as the cause for climate warming. However, closure depends on invoking an unrealistically large increase in aerosol cooling(2) during the so-called global warming hiatus since the late 1990s (refs 3,4) that was due partly to tropical Pacific Ocean cooling(5-7). The difficulty with this closure lies in the assumption that the same climate feedback applies to both anthropogenic warming and natural cooling. Here we analyse climate model simulations with and without anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, and show that top-of-the-atmosphere radiation and global mean surface temperature are much less tightly coupled for natural decadal variability than for the greenhouse-gas-induced response, implying distinct climate feedback between anthropogenic warming and natural variability. In addition, we identify a phase difference between top-of-the-atmosphere radiation and global mean surface temperature such that ocean heat uptake tends to slow down during the surface warming hiatus. This result deviates from existing energy theory but we find that it is broadly consistent with observations. Our study highlights the importance of developing metrics that distinguish anthropogenic change from natural variations to attribute climate variability and to estimate climate sensitivity from observations.

Kilpatrick, T, Xie SP, Nasuno T.  2017.  Diurnal Convection-Wind Coupling in the Bay of Bengal. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 122:9705-9720.   10.1002/2017jd027271   AbstractWebsite

Satellite observations of infrared brightness temperature and rainfall have shown offshore propagation of diurnal rainfall signals in some coastal areas of the tropics, suggesting that diurnal rainfall is coupled to land-sea breeze circulations. Here we utilize satellite observations of surface winds and rainfall to show the offshore copropagation of land breeze and diurnal rainfall signals for 300-400 km from the east coast of India into the Bay of Bengal. The wind observations are from the 2003 Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT)-SeaWinds "tandem mission" and from 17 years of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI); the rainfall observations are from the TRMM 3B42 product and from TMI. The surface wind convergence maximum leads the rainfall maximum by 1-2 h in the western part of the bay, implying that the land breeze forces the diurnal cycle of rainfall. The phase speed of the offshore propagation is approximately 18 m s(-1), consistent with a deep hydrostatic gravity wave forced by diurnal heating over India. Comparisons with a cloud system-resolving atmospheric model and the ERA-Interim reanalysis indicate that the models realistically simulate the surface land breeze but greatly underestimate the amplitude of the rainfall diurnal cycle. The satellite observations presented in this study therefore provide a benchmark for model representation of this important atmosphere-ocean-land surface interaction. Plain Language Summary Satellite rainfall observations show a strong diurnal cycle in the Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon. Here for the first time we utilize concurrent satellite observations of surface winds and rainfall to demonstrate the interaction between the land-sea breeze, forced by the diurnal cycle of solar heating over India, and diurnal rainfall over the Bay of Bengal. The observations are consistent with the land breeze acting as a forcing mechanism for the diurnal cycle of rainfall over the bay and, therefore, illuminate an important atmosphere-ocean-land surface interaction that is poorly represented in many climate models.

Wang, H, Xie SP, Kosaka Y, Liu QY, Du Y.  2019.  Dynamics of Asian summer monsoon response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Journal of Climate. 32:843-858.   10.1175/jcli-d-18-0386.1   AbstractWebsite

Anthropogenic aerosols partially mask the greenhouse warming and cause the reduction in Asian summer monsoon precipitation and circulation. By decomposing the atmospheric change into the direct atmospheric response to radiative forcing and sea surface temperature (SST)-mediated change, the physical mechanisms for anthropogenic-aerosol-induced changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) are diagnosed. Using coupled and atmospheric general circulation models, this study shows that the aerosol-induced troposphere cooling over Asian land regions generates anomalous sinking motion between 20 degrees and 40 degrees N and weakens the EASM north of 20 degrees N without SST change. The decreased EASM precipitation and the attendant wind changes are largely due to this direct atmospheric response to radiative forcing, although the aerosol-induced North Pacific SST cooling also contributes. The SST-mediated change dominates the aerosol-induced SASM response, with contributions from both the north-south interhemispheric SST gradient and the local SST cooling pattern over the tropical Indian Ocean. Specifically, with large meridional gradient, the zonal-mean SST cooling pattern is most important for the Asian summer monsoon response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing, resulting in a reorganization of the regional meridional atmospheric overturning circulation. While uncertainty in aerosol radiative forcing has been emphasized in the literature, our results show that the intermodel spread is as large in the SST effect on summer monsoon rainfall, calling for more research into the ocean-atmosphere coupling.

Kosaka, Y, Xie S-P, Nakamura H.  2011.  Dynamics of Interannual Variability in Summer Precipitation over East Asia. Journal of Climate. 24:5435-5453.   10.1175/2011jcli4099.1   Abstract
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Wang, MY, Du Y, Qui B, Xie SP, Feng M.  2019.  Dynamics on seasonal variability of EKE associated with TIWs in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 49:1503-1519.   10.1175/jpo-d-18-0163.1   AbstractWebsite

Energetic mesoscale eddies (vortices) associated with tropical instability waves (TIWs) exist in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean between 0 degrees and 8 degrees N. This study examines the seasonal variations in eddy kinetic energy (EKE) of TIWs using in situ and satellite observations and elucidates the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The results reveal that the cross-equatorial southerly winds are key to sustaining the high-level EKE (up to similar to 600 cm(2) s(-2)) from boreal summer to winter in 0 degrees-6 degrees N and 155 degrees-110 degrees W. Because of the beta effect and the surface wind divergence, the southerly winds generate anticyclonic wind curls north of the equator that intensify the sea surface temperature (SST) fronts and force the downwelling annual Rossby waves. The resultant sea surface height ridge induces strong horizontal current shears between 0 degrees and 5 degrees N. The intensified current shears and SST fronts generate EKE via barotropic and baroclinic instabilities, respectively. To the extent that the seasonal migration of a northward-displaced intertropical convergence zone intensifies the southerly winds north of, but not south of, the equator, our study suggests that the climatic asymmetry is important for the oceanic eddy generations in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean-a result with important implications for coupled climate simulation/prediction.