Classification of Risso's and Pacific white-sided dolphins using spectral properties of echolocation clicks

Citation:
Soldevilla, MS, Henderson EE, Campbell GS, Wiggins SM, Hildebrand JA, Roch MA.  2008.  Classification of Risso's and Pacific white-sided dolphins using spectral properties of echolocation clicks. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 124:609-624.: ASA

Date Published:

Jul

Keywords:

ACOUSTIC IDENTIFICATION, bioacoustics, bird song, bottle-nosed dolphins, california, DELPHINUS-DELPHIS, eastern tropical pacific, grampus-griseus, pattern classification, species recognition, spectral analysis, sperm-whale clicks, tursiops-truncatus, zoology

Abstract:

The spectral and temporal properties of echolocation clicks and the use of clicks for species classification are investigated for five species of free-ranging dolphins found offshore of southern California: short-beaked common (Delphinus delphis), long-beaked common (D. capensis), Risso's (Grampus griseus), Pacific white-sided (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens), and bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus) dolphins. Spectral properties are compared among the five species and unique spectral peak and notch patterns are described for two species. The spectral peak mean values from Pacific white-sided dolphin clicks are 22.2, 26.6, 33.7, and 37.3 kHz and from Risso's dolphins are 22.4, 25.5, 30.5, and 38.8 kHz. The spectral notch mean values from Pacific white-sided dolphin clicks are 19.0, 24.5, and 29.7 kHz and from Risso's dolphins are 19.6, 27.7, and 35.9 kHz. Analysis of variance analyses indicate that spectral peaks and notches within the frequency band 24–35 kHz are distinct between the two species and exhibit low variation within each species. Post hoc tests divide Pacific white-sided dolphin recordings into two distinct subsets containing different click types, which are hypothesized to represent the different populations that occur within the region. Bottlenose and common dolphin clicks do not show consistent patterns of spectral peaks or notches within the frequency band examined (1–100 kHz).

Notes:

n/a

Website

DOI:

10.1121/1.2932059