Publications

Export 10 results:
Sort by: Author [ Title  (Asc)] Type Year
A B C D [E] F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
E
Stone, PH, Quirk WJ, Somervil.Rc.  1974.  Effect of Small-Scale Vertical Mixing of Horizontal Momentum in a General Circulation Model. Monthly Weather Review. 102:765-771.   10.1175/1520-0493(1974)102<0765:teossv>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Several experiments are described in which the sub-grid-scale vertical eddy viscosity in the GISS global general circulation model was varied. The results show that large viscosities suppress large-scale eddies in middle and high latitudes, but enhance the circulation in the tropical Hadley cell and increase the extent of the tropical easterlies. Comparison with observations shows that the GISS model requires eddy viscosities 1 m2/s or less to give realistic results for middle and high latitudes, and eddy viscosities 100 m2/s to give realistic results for low latitudes. A plausible mechanism for the implied increase in small-scale mixing in low latitudes is cumulus convection.

Lee, WH, Somerville RCJ.  1996.  Effects of alternative cloud radiation parameterizations in a general circulation model. Annales Geophysicae-Atmospheres Hydrospheres and Space Sciences. 14:107-114.   10.1007/s00585-996-0107-6   AbstractWebsite

Using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (MCAR) general circulation model (CCM2), a suite of alternative cloud radiation parameterizations has been tested. Our methodology relies on perpetual July integrations driven by +/-2 K sea surface temperature forcing. The tested parameterizations include relative humidity based clouds and versions of schemes involving a prognostic cloud water budget. We are especially interested in testing the effect of cloud optical thickness feedbacks on global climate sensitivity. All schemes exhibit negative cloud radiation feedbacks, i.e., cloud moderates the global warming. However, these negative net cloud radiation feedbacks consist of quite different shortwave and longwave components between a scheme with interactive cloud radiative properties and several schemes with specified cloud water paths. An increase in cloud water content in the warmer climate leads to optically thicker middle- and low-level clouds and in turn negative shortwave feedbacks for the interactive radiative scheme, while a decrease in cloud amount leads to a positive shortwave feedback for the other schemes. For the longwave feedbacks, a decrease in high effective cloudiness for the schemes without interactive radiative properties leads to a negative feedback, while no distinct changes in effective high cloudiness and the resulting feedback are exhibited for the scheme with interactive radiative properties. The resulting magnitude of negative net cloud radiation feed-back is largest for the scheme with interactive radiative properties. Even though the simulated values of cloud radiative forcing for the present climate using this method differ most from the observational data, the approach shows great promise for the future.

Somerville, RCJ, Iacobellis S, Lee WH.  1996.  Effects of cloud-radiation schemes on climate model results. World Resource Review. 8:321-333. Abstract

A current dilemma of climate modeling is that model results are strongly sensitive to the treatment of certain poorly-understood physical processes, especially cloud-radiation interactions. Thus, different models with alternative plausible parameterizations often give widely varying results. Yet, we typically have had little basis for estimating which parameterization is more realistic. Of the many physical processes involved in climate simulations, feedbacks due to cloud-radiation interactions are thought to be the largest single source of uncertainty. In fact, most of the global differences in results between leading climate models, as measured by their sensitivity to greenhouse gases, can be traced to different model treatments of cloud-radiation interactions.Using a modern atmospheric general circulation model (the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model: CCM2), we have investigated the effects on climate sensitivity of several different cloud-radiation parameterizations. At the same time, we have validated these parameterizations directly with observations from field experiments. In addition to the original cloud-radiation scheme of CCM2, we tested four parameterizations incorporating prognostic cloud water: one version with prescribed cloud radiative properties and three other versions with interactive cloud radiative properties. Comparisons with measurements suggest that schemes with explicit cloud water budgets and interactive radiative properties are potentially capable of matching observational data closely.

Pritchard, MS, Somerville RCJ.  2009.  Empirical orthogonal function analysis of the diurnal cycle of precipitation in a multi-scale climate model. Geophysical Research Letters. 36   10.1029/2008gl036964   AbstractWebsite

Long-term variability in the hydrologic cycle is poorly simulated by current generation global climate models (GCMs), partly due to known climatological biases at shorter timescales. We demonstrate that a prototype Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) provides a superior representation of the spatial and temporal structure of precipitation at diurnal timescales than a GCM. Results from empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition of the boreal summer climatological composite diurnal cycle of precipitation in an MMF are compared to a GCM and satellite data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. The eigenspectrum, principal component time series, and the spatial structure of leading EOFs in an eigenmode decomposition of the MMF composite day are a much better match to observations than the GCM. Regional deficiencies in the MMF diurnal cycle are manifest as localized anomalies in the spatial structures of the first two leading EOFs. Citation: Pritchard, M. S., and R. C. J. Somerville (2009), Empirical orthogonal function analysis of the diurnal cycle of precipitation in a multi-scale climate model, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L05812, doi: 10.1029/2008GL036964.

Baker, WE, Kung EC, Somerville RCJ.  1978.  An Energetics Analysis of Forecast Experiments with NCAR General Circulation Model. Monthly Weather Review. 106:311-323.   10.1175/1520-0493(1978)106<0311:aeaofe>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The energetics in numerical weather forecast experiments with the NCAR general circulation model have been analyzed. The 6-layer, 5-degree, second-generation global model was used to make two 10-day forecasts with the same initial conditions. The two experiments differed primarily in the methods of convective parameterization.Hemispheric integrals of the model energies and energy transformations are presented in the context of their approach to a quasi-equilibrium climatology. Spectral and spatial analyses of the eddy energies and transformations provide further insight into the model response to the initial conditions. After the initial adjustment, the eddy kinetic energy appears to lag the conversion from eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy by at least 48 h in the long waves (wavenumbers 1–4) and by approximately 24 h in the baroclinic waves (wavenumbers 5–7), whereas little or no time lag is apparent in the short waves (wavenumbers 8–12).The sensitivity of the forecast energetics to two different convective parameterizations is also examined. There is little appreciable difference between the two experiments in the eddy kinetic energy integrals during the first 36 h of the forecast, but temporal patterns of the eddy transformations are distinctly different after 12 h.

Baker, WE, Kung EC, Somerville RCJ.  1977.  Energetics Diagnosis of the NCAR General Circulation Model. Monthly Weather Review. 105:1384-1401.   10.1175/1520-0493(1977)105<1384:edotng>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

A comprehensive energetics analysis has been performed on the NCAR general circulation model. The analysis involves January and July simulation experiments with the 6-layer, 5-degree, second-generation model with two different convective schemes. Spectral analysis of the energy transformations in the wave-number domain was performed separately on a global and hemispheric basis as well as for the tropics and mid-latitudes. Latitudinal distributions of energy variables were also examined.A qualitative agreement with observational estimates is generally recognized in the transformations of eddy energies. Quantitatively, however, the eddy energies, conversions and energy transfer between wavenumbers are weaker than observational estimates. It is noteworthy that substantial differences exist in the energetics of the two versions of the model with different convective schemes.

Iacobellis, SF, Somerville RCJ.  2006.  Evaluating parameterizations of the autoconversion process using a single-column model and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program measurements. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 111   10.1029/2005jd006296   AbstractWebsite

A single-column model is used to evaluate the performance of two types of autoconversion parameterizations. The model results are compared to data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern U. S. Great Plains site. The model is run over a period covering 2 years (2000-2001), and the results are analyzed for time periods varying from hourly to seasonal. During a relatively short 27-hour period during March 2000 characterized primarily by shallow frontal clouds, modeled values of cloud liquid water were better simulated using a Manton-Cotton-type autoconversion parameterization. However, over longer timescales representing a multitude of different cloud types and meteorological conditions, a Sundqvist-type parameterization produced better results. Analysis of the model results indicates that the Manton-Cotton-type parameterization does better during periods when shallow clouds are present without any overlying clouds, while the Sundqvist-type parameterization is preferred during periods when high and low clouds coexist. A possible explanation is that precipitation from high clouds may not be represented well by the SCM, thus affecting the precipitation formation rates in any lower clouds. Sensitivity tests using the Manton-Cotton parameterization indicate that the autoconversion rate is sensitive to the specification of the cloud droplet number concentration (N-c). The single-column model, as well as many general circulation models, specify N-c as a constant value. However, limited in situ measurements suggest that N-c varies significantly in time. The mean modeled top-of-atmosphere cloud radiative forcing during the 2-year period 2000-2001 differed by 3 W m(-2) as the cloud droplet concentration was varied between minimum and maximum values suggested by the in situ measurements. These results imply that model-produced hydrological cycle and cloud-radiation interactions could be better modeled using an accurate time-dependent measure of the cloud droplet concentration.

Lane, DE, Somerville RCJ, Iacobellis S.  2001.  Evaluation of a Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Using Ground-based Measurements. IRS 2000: Current Problems in Atmospheric Radiation : Proceedings of the International Radiation Symposium, St. Petersberg, Russia, 24-29 July 2000. ( Smith WL, Timofeyev YM, Eds.).:245-248.: A Deepak Publishing Abstract
n/a
Druyan, LM, Somerville RCJ, Quirk WJ.  1975.  Extended-Range Forecasts with GISS Model of Global Atmosphere. Monthly Weather Review. 103:779-795.   10.1175/1520-0493(1975)103<0779:erfwtg>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite
n/a