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Somerville, RCJ, Quirk WJ, Hansen JE, Lacis AA, Stone PH.  1976.  Search for Short-Term Meteorological Effects of Solar Variability in an Atmospheric Circulation Model. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans and Atmospheres. 81:1572-1576.   10.1029/JC081i009p01572   AbstractWebsite

A set of numerical experiments is carried out to test the short-range sensitivity of the Giss (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) global atmospheric general circulation model to changes in solar constant and ozone amount. These experiments consist of forecasts initialized with actual atmospheric data. One set of forecasts is made with a standard version of the model, and another set uses the model modified by very different values of the solar constant (two thirds and three halves of the standard value) and of the ozone amount (zero and twice the standard amount). Twelve-day integrations with these very large variations show such small effects that the effects of realistic variations would almost certainly be insignificant meteorologically on this time scale.

Somerville, RCJ.  2008.  If I were president: A climate change speech. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 89:1180-1182. Abstract
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Somerville, R, Lauder P, Rogo R.  1993.  Change on Planet Earth. : UCSD Extension, University of California, San Diego AbstractWebsite
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Somerville, RCJ, Lipps FB.  1973.  A Numerical Study in Three Space Dimensions of Bénard Convection in a Rotating Fluid. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 30:590-596.: American Meteorological Society   10.1175/1520-0469(1973)030<0590:ansits>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The primitive, nonlinear, Boussinesq equations of motion, continuity and thermodynamic energy are integrated numerically in three space dimensions and time to study convection driven by unstable vertical density gradients and subject to Coriolis forces. Parameter values are chosen to permit quantitative comparison with data from laboratory experiments for rotating Bénard convection in water. The model realistically simulates the structure of the convection cells, their horizontal scale, and the mean vertical heat transport. The experimentally observed phenomenon of a non-monotone dependence of heat transport on rotation rate is reproduced and shown to be a consequence of the rotational constraint on the wavelength of the cells.

Somerville, RCJ, Hassol SJ.  2011.  Communicating the science of climate change. Physics Today. 64:48-53.   10.1063/PT.3.1296   AbstractWebsite

It is urgent that climate scientists improve the ways they convey their findings to a poorly informed and often indifferent public.

Somerville, RCJ, Remer LA.  1984.  Cloud Optical-Thickness Feedbacks in the Co2 Climate Problem. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 89:9668-9672.   10.1029/JD089iD06p09668   AbstractWebsite

A radiative-convective equilibrium model is developed and applied to study cloud optical thickness feedbacks in the CO2 climate problem. The basic hypothesis is that in the warmer and moister CO2-rich atmosphere, cloud liquid water content will generally be larger too. For clouds other than thin cirrus the result is to increase the albedo more than to increase the greenhouse effect. Thus the sign of the feedback is negative: cloud optical properties act as a thermostat and alter in such a way as to reduce the surface and tropospheric warming caused by the addition of CO2. This negative feedback can be substantial. When observational estimates of the temperature dependence of cloud liquid water content are employed in the model, the surface temperature change caused by doubling CO2 is reduced by about one half. This result is obtained for global and annual average conditions, no change in cloud amount or altitude, and constant relative humidity. These idealizations, together with other simplifications typical of one-dimensional radiative-convective climate models, render the result tentative. Further study of cloud optical property feedbacks is warranted, however, because the climate is apparently so sensitive to them.

Somerville, RCJ, Iacobellis SF.  1999.  Single-column models, ARM observations, and GCM cloud-radiation schemes. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth Part B-Hydrology Oceans and Atmosphere. 24:733-740.   10.1016/s1464-1909(99)00074-x   AbstractWebsite

Among the most serious sources of uncertainty in current general circulation models (GCMs) is the treatment of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions. We have used a single-column model (SCM) diagnostically to evaluate parameterizations against observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. We find that schemes with explicit cloud water budgets and interactive radiative properties are potentially capable of matching observational data closely. In our SCM, using an interactive cloud droplet radius decreases the cloud optical thickness and cloud infrared emittance of high clouds, which acts to increase the downwelling surface shortwave flux and the outgoing longwave radiation. However, it is difficult to evaluate the realism of the vertical distribution of model-produced cloud extinction, cloud emittance, cloud liquid water content and effective cloud droplet radius until high-quality observations of these quantities become more widely available. We also find that in the SCM, cloud parameterizations often underestimate the observed cloud amount, and that ARM observations indicate the presence of clouds while the corresponding maximum relative humidity is less than 80%. This implies that the underlying concept of a critical gridpoint relative humidity of about 80% for cloud formation, as used in many GCM cloud parameterizations, may need to be reexamined. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Somerville, RCJ.  1977.  Pattern Recognition Techniques for Weather Forecast Verification. Contributions to Atmospheric Physics [Beitraege zur Physik der Atmosphaere.], Wiesbaden, Germany. 50:403-410. Abstract
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Somerville, RCJ.  2014.  Is learning about climate change like having a colonoscopy? Earth's Future. 2:119-121.: Wiley Periodicals, Inc.   10.1002/2013EF000169   Abstract

Many people avoid having valuable medical tests from fear of the results
People resist learning about climate change, fearing unpleasant consequences
Research suggests addressing these concerns early, aids in communication

Stone, PH, Quirk WJ, Somervil.Rc.  1974.  Effect of Small-Scale Vertical Mixing of Horizontal Momentum in a General Circulation Model. Monthly Weather Review. 102:765-771.   10.1175/1520-0493(1974)102<0765:teossv>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Several experiments are described in which the sub-grid-scale vertical eddy viscosity in the GISS global general circulation model was varied. The results show that large viscosities suppress large-scale eddies in middle and high latitudes, but enhance the circulation in the tropical Hadley cell and increase the extent of the tropical easterlies. Comparison with observations shows that the GISS model requires eddy viscosities 1 m2/s or less to give realistic results for middle and high latitudes, and eddy viscosities 100 m2/s to give realistic results for low latitudes. A plausible mechanism for the implied increase in small-scale mixing in low latitudes is cumulus convection.