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Keeling, RF, Visbeck M.  2001.  Palaeoceanography - Antarctic stratification and glacial CO2. Nature. 412:605-606.   10.1038/35088129   AbstractWebsite

One way of accounting for lowered atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations during Pleistocene glacial periods is by invoking the Antarctic stratification hypothesis, which links the reduction in CO2 to greater stratification of ocean surface waters around Antarctica1, 2. As discussed by Sigman and Boyle3, this hypothesis assumes that increased stratification in the Antarctic zone (Fig. 1) was associated with reduced upwelling of deep waters around Antarctica, thereby allowing CO2 outgassing to be suppressed by biological production while also allowing biological production to decline, which is consistent with Antarctic sediment records4. We point out here, however, that the response of ocean eddies to increased Antarctic stratification can be expected to increase, rather than reduce, the upwelling rate of deep waters around Antarctica. The stratification hypothesis may have difficulty in accommodating eddy feedbacks on upwelling within the constraints imposed by reconstructions of winds and Antarctic-zone productivity in glacial periods.

Langenfelds, RL, Francey RJ, Steele LP, Battle M, Keeling RF, Budd WF.  1999.  Partitioning of the global fossil CO2 sink using a 19-year trend in atmospheric O2. Geophysical Research Letters. 26:1897-1900.   10.1029/1999gl900446   AbstractWebsite

O-2/N-2 is measured in the Cape Grim Air Archive (CGAA), a suite of tanks filled with background air at Cape Grim, Tasmania (40.7 degrees S, 144.8 degrees E) between April 1978 and January 1997. Derived trends are compared with published O-2/N-2 records and assessed against limits on interannual variability of net terrestrial exchanges imposed by trends of delta(13)C in CO2. Two old samples from 1978 and 1987 and eight from 1996/97 survive critical selection criteria and give a mean 19-year trend in delta(O-2/N-2) of -16.7 +/- 0.5 per meg y(-1), implying net storage of +2.3 +/- 0.7 GtC (10(15) g carbon) yr(-1) of fossil fuel CO2 in the oceans and +0.2 +/- 0.9 GtC yr(-1) in the terrestrial biosphere. The uptake terms are consistent for both O-2/N-2 and delta(13)C tracers if the mean C-13 isotopic disequilibrium flux, combining terrestrial and oceanic contributions, is 93 +/- 15 GtC parts per thousand yr(-1).

Perks, HM, Charles CD, Keeling RF.  2002.  Precessionally forced productivity variations across the equatorial Pacific. Paleoceanography. 17   10.1029/2000pa000603   AbstractWebsite

[1] Measurements of combustion oxygen demand (COD) in two sediment cores provide a record of paleoproductivity driven by surface-ocean dynamics in the equatorial eastern and western Pacific for the past 400,000 years. The COD time series are well correlated with each other over this time span and show pronounced precessionally forced peaks of higher productivity during globally colder periods. The phase of this signal in the two cores is identical, to within chronological uncertainties, suggesting a common insolation forcing mechanism for the upper ocean across the equatorial Pacific. COD is also in phase with the precessionally forced component of global ice volume, as indicated by oxygen isotopes, and with atmospheric methane in the Vostok ice core. These relationships imply that the COD relative paleoproductivity index provides an important diagnostic measure of the mechanisms of tropical ocean dynamics and climate change.

Manning, AC, Keeling RF, Severinghaus JP.  1999.  Precise atmospheric oxygen measurements with a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer. Global Biogeochemical Cycles. 13:1107-1115.   10.1029/1999gb900054   AbstractWebsite

A methodology has been developed for making continuous, high-precision measurements of atmospheric oxygen concentrations by modifying a commercially available paramagnetic oxygen analyzer. Incorporating several design improvements, an effective precision of 0.2 ppm O-2 from repeated measurements over a 1-hour interval was achieved. This is sufficient to detect background changes in atmospheric O-2 to a level that constrains various aspects of the global carbon cycle. The analyzer was used to measure atmospheric O-2 in a semicontinuous fashion from air sampled from the end of Scripps Pier, La Jolla, California, and data from a 1-week period in August 1996 are shown. The data exhibit strongly anticorrelated changes in O-2 and CO2 caused by local or regional combustion of fossil fuels. During periods of steady background CO2 concentrations, however, we see additional variability in O-2 concentrations, clearly not due to local combustion and presumably due to oceanic sources or sinks of O-2. This variability suggests that in contrast to CO2, higher O-2 sampling rates, such as those provided by continuous measurement programs, may be necessary to define an atmospheric O-2 background and thus aid in validating and interpreting other O-2 data from flask sampling programs. Our results have also demonstrated that this paramagnetic analyzer and gas handling design is well suited for making continuous measurements of atmospheric O-2 and is suitable for placement at remote background air monitoring sites.