Ocean deoxygenation in a warming world

Citation:
Keeling, RF, Kortzinger A, Gruber N.  2010.  Ocean deoxygenation in a warming world. Annual Review of Marine Science. 2:199-229., Palo Alto: Annual Reviews

Keywords:

anthropogenic co2, apparent oxygen utilization, atmospheric o-2/n-2, biotic carbon sinks, carbon cycle, climate-change, eutrophication, global warming, hypoxia, interannual variability, mixed-layer, ocean oxygen depletion, oxygen cycle, oxygen utilization, recent, southern-ocean, stratification, sub-arctic pacific, subtropical north pacific, ventilation, winter

Abstract:

Ocean warming and increased stratification of the upper ocean caused by global climate change will likely lead to declines in dissolved O(2) in the ocean interior (ocean deoxygenation) with implications for ocean productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, and marine habitat. Ocean models predict declines of 1 to 7% in the global ocean O(2) inventory over the next century, with declines continuing for a thousand years or more into the future. An important consequence may be an expansion in the area and volume of so-called oxygen minimum zones, where O(2) levels are too low to support many macrofauna and profound changes in biogeochemical cycling occur. Significant deoxy enation has occurred over the past 50 years in the North Pacific and tropical oceans, suggesting larger changes are looming. The potential for larger O(2) declines in the future suggests the need for all improved observing system for tracking ocean O(2) changes.

Notes:

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DOI:

10.1146/annurev.marine.010908.163855