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2018
Arnold, T, Manning AJ, Kim J, Li SL, Webster H, Thomson D, Muhle J, Weiss RF, Park S, O'Doherty S.  2018.  Inverse modelling of CF4 and NF3 emissions in East Asia. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 18:13305-13320.   10.5194/acp-18-13305-2018   AbstractWebsite

Decadal trends in the atmospheric abundances of carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) and nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) have been well characterised and have provided a time series of global total emissions. Information on locations of emissions contributing to the global total, however, is currently poor. We use a unique set of measurements between 2008 and 2015 from the Gosan station, Jeju Island, South Korea (part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment network), together with an atmospheric transport model, to make spatially disaggregated emission estimates of these gases in East Asia. Due to the poor availability of good prior information for this study, our emission estimates are largely influenced by the atmospheric measurements. Notably, we are able to highlight emission hotspots of NF3 and CF4 in South Korea due to the measurement location. We calculate emissions of CF4 to be quite constant between the years 2008 and 2015 for both China and South Korea, with 2015 emissions calculated at 4.3 +/- 2.7 and 0.36 +/- 0.11 Gg yr(-1), respectively. Emission estimates of NF3 from South Korea could be made with relatively small uncertainty at 0.6 +/- 0.07 Gg yr(-1) in 2015, which equates to similar to 1.6% of the country's CO2 emissions. We also apply our method to calculate emissions of CHF3 (HFC-23) between 2008 and 2012, for which our results find good agreement with other studies and which helps support our choice in methodology for CF4 and NF3.

2011
Vollmer, MK, Miller BR, Rigby M, Reimann S, Muhle J, Krummel PB, O'Doherty S, Kim J, Rhee TS, Weiss RF, Fraser PJ, Simmonds PG, Salameh PK, Harth CM, Wang RHJ, Steele LP, Young D, Lunder CR, Hermansen O, Ivy D, Arnold T, Schmidbauer N, Kim KR, Greally BR, Hill M, Leist M, Wenger A, Prinn RG.  2011.  Atmospheric histories and global emissions of the anthropogenic hydrofluorocarbons HFC-365mfc, HFC-245fa, HFC-227ea, and HFC-236fa. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 116   10.1029/2010jd015309   AbstractWebsite

We report on ground-based atmospheric measurements and emission estimates of the four anthropogenic hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) HFC-365mfc (CH(3)CF(2)CH(2)CF(3), 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane), HFC-245fa (CHF(2)CH(2)CF(3), 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane), HFC-227ea (CF(3)CHFCF(3), 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane), and HFC-236fa (CF(3)CH(2)CF(3), 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane). In situ measurements are from the global monitoring sites of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), the System for Observations of Halogenated Greenhouse Gases in Europe (SOGE), and Gosan (South Korea). We include the first halocarbon flask sample measurements from the Antarctic research stations King Sejong and Troll. We also present measurements of archived air samples from both hemispheres back to the 1970s. We use a two-dimensional atmospheric transport model to simulate global atmospheric abundances and to estimate global emissions. HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa first appeared in the atmosphere only similar to 1 decade ago; they have grown rapidly to globally averaged dry air mole fractions of 0.53 ppt (in parts per trillion, 10(-12)) and 1.1 ppt, respectively, by the end of 2010. In contrast, HFC-227ea first appeared in the global atmosphere in the 1980s and has since grown to similar to 0.58 ppt. We report the first measurements of HFC-236fa in the atmosphere. This long-lived compound was present in the atmosphere at only 0.074 ppt in 2010. All four substances exhibit yearly growth rates of >8% yr(-1) at the end of 2010. We find rapidly increasing emissions for the foam-blowing compounds HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa starting in similar to 2002. After peaking in 2006 (HFC-365mfc: 3.2 kt yr(-1), HFC-245fa: 6.5 kt yr(-1)), emissions began to decline. Our results for these two compounds suggest that recent estimates from long-term projections (to the late 21st century) have strongly overestimated emissions for the early years of the projections (similar to 2005-2010). Global HFC-227ea and HFC-236fa emissions have grown to average values of 2.4 kt yr(-1) and 0.18 kt y(r-)1 over the 2008-2010 period, respectively.