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Bender, M, Jahnke R, Weiss R, Martin W, Heggie DT, Orchardo J, Sowers T.  1989.  Organic carbon oxidation and benthic nitrogen and silica dynamics in San Clemente Basin, a continental borderland site. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 53:685-697.   10.1016/0016-7037(89)90011-2   AbstractWebsite

Organic carbon oxidation rates in San Clemente Basin were determined by benthic chamber experiments using the Bottom Lander, along with studies of pore water chemistry. Non-steady-state diagenetic models are developed for interpreting concentration-time data from the benthic chamber experiments. O2, NO3−, and SO42− are all important oxidants for organic carbon at our study site. Regenerated fixed nitrogen was consumed by NO3− reduction. There is a flux of NO3− into the sediments, and the benthic flux of NH4+ is undetectable. The total rate at which fixed nitrogen is removed from the oceans at this site is about twice the flux of PON to the sea floor. SiO2 fluxes calculated from interfacial pore water gradients are in satisfactory agreement with those determined using the Lander. Most silica dissolution must therefore occur within the sediments, although interstitial profiles show that little dissolution occurs below 1 cm depth.

Bill, M, Rhew RC, Weiss RF, Goldstein AH.  2002.  Carbon isotope ratios of methyl bromide and methyl chloride emitted from a coastal salt marsh. Geophysical Research Letters. 29   10.1029/2001gl012946   AbstractWebsite

[1] Methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) play important roles in stratospheric ozone depletion, but their atmospheric budgets have large uncertainties. The analysis of stable isotope composition of methyl halides may provide useful independent information for further constraining their budgets. Here we report the first measurements of CH3Br and CH3Cl stable carbon isotope ratios emitted from a biogenic source under in situ conditions. CH3Br and CH3Cl emissions from the salt marsh plant Batis maritima showed a strong diurnal variation in delta(13)C, from -65parts per thousand during the daytime to --12parts per thousand at night. The minimum delta(13)C values were observed at midday, coinciding with the time of greatest emissions and ambient temperature. At night, when the emissions were much smaller, the stable carbon isotopic ratios of CH3Br and CH3Cl became enriched in C-13. The daily mean delta(13)C of CH3Br and CH3Cl emissions, weighted by emission rate, were -43parts per thousand and -62parts per thousand respectively.

Broecker, WS, Peacock SL, Walker S, Weiss R, Fahrbach E, Schroeder M, Mikolajewicz U, Heinze C, Key R, Peng TH, Rubin S.  1998.  How much deep water is formed in the Southern Ocean? Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 103:15833-15843.   10.1029/98jc00248   AbstractWebsite

Three tracers are used to place constraints on the production rate of ventilated deep water in the Southern Ocean. The distribution of the water mass tracer PO4* ("phosphate star") in the deep sea suggests that the amount of ventilated deep water produced in the Southern Ocean is equal to or greater than the outflow of North Atlantic Deep Water from the Atlantic. Radiocarbon distributions yield an export flux of water from the North Atlantic which has averaged about 15 Sv over the last several hundred years. CFC inventories are used as a direct indicator of the current production rate of ventilated deep water in the Southern Ocean. Although coverage is as yet sparse, it appears that the CFC inventory is not inconsistent with the deep water production rate required by the distributions of PO4* and radiocarbon. It has been widely accepted that the major part of the deep water production in the Southern Ocean takes place in the Weddell Sea. However, our estimate of the Southern Ocean ventilated deep water flux is in conflict with previous estimates of the flux of ventilated deep water from the Weddell Sea, which lie in the range 1-5 Sv. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed.

Broecker, WS, Ledwell JR, Takahashi T, Weiss R, Merlivat L, Memery L, Peng TH, Jahne B, Munnich KO.  1986.  Isotopic versus micrometeorologic ocean CO2 fluxes: A serious conflict. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 91:517-527.   10.1029/JC091iC09p10517   AbstractWebsite

Eddy correlation measurements over the ocean give CO2 fluxes an order of magnitude or more larger than expected from mass balance measurements using radiocarbon and radon 222. In particular, Smith and Jones (1985) reported large upward and downward fluxes in a surf zone at supersaturations of 15% and attributed them to the equilibration of bubbles at elevated pressures. They argue that even on the open ocean such bubble injection may create steady state CO2 supersaturations and that inferences of fluxes based on air-sea pCO2 differences and radon exchange velocities must be made with caution. We defend the global average CO2 exchange rate determined by three independent radioisotopic means: prebomb radiocarbon inventories; global surveys of mixed layer radon deficits; and oceanic uptake of bomb-produced radiocarbon. We argue that laboratory and lake data do not lead one to expect fluxes as large as reported from the eddy correlation technique; that the radon method of determining exchange velocities is indeed useful for estimating CO2 fluxes; that supersaturations of CO2 due to bubble injection on the open ocean are negligible; that the hypothesis that Smith and Jones advance cannot account for the fluxes that they report; and that the pCO2 values reported by Smith and Jones are likely to be systematically much too high. The CO2 fluxes for the ocean measured to date by the micrometeorological method can be reconciled with neither the observed concentrations of radioisotopes of radon and carbon in the oceans nor the tracer experiments carried out in lakes and in wind/wave tunnels.

Bullister, JL, Weiss RF.  1983.  Anthropogenic chlorofluoromethanes in the Greenland and Norwegian Seas. Science. 221:265-268.   10.1126/science.221.4607.265   AbstractWebsite

The concentrations of two industrially produced chlorofluoromethanes, CCl3F(F-11) and CCl2F2(F-12), have been measured in the water column and in the marine atmosphere of the Greenland and Norwegian seas. Measurable concentrations of these two chlorofluoromethanes have penetrated to the deep basins of both of these regions, and the general characteristics of their vertical distributions are similar to those of the bomb-produced radioisotopes injected into the atmosphere on a similar time scale. The data have been fitted to a time-dependent box model based on deep convective mixing in the Greenland Sea and lateral exchange between the deep basins. The model calculations for the two chlorofluoromethanes in the Greenland Sea give similar results, with a time scale for deep convection of about 40 years. The time scale for lateral mixing between the deep Greenland Sea and the deep Norwegian Sea is estimated to be 20 to 30 years, although the agreement between the calculations for the two chlorofluoromethanes is limited by analytical uncertainties at the low concentrations found in the deep Norwegian Sea and by uncertainties in the model assumptions.

Bullister, JL, Weiss RF.  1988.  Determination of CCl3F and CCl2F2 in seawater and air. Deep-Sea Research Part a-Oceanographic Research Papers. 35:839-853.   10.1016/0198-0149(88)90033-7   AbstractWebsite

An improved analytical technique has been developed for the rapid and accurate shipboard measurement of two anthropogenically produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), CCl3F (F-11) and CCl2F2 (F-12) in air and seawater. Gas samples (dry air or standard) are injected into a stream of purified gas and then concentrated in a low temperature trap. Seawater samples collected in oceanographic Niskin bottles are transferred into glass syringes for storage until analysis. An aliquot of approximately 30 cm3 of seawater is introduced into a glass stripping chamber where the dissolved gases are purged with purified gas, and the evolved CFCs are concentrated in the same cold trap. The trap is subsequently isolated and heated, and the CFCs are automatically transferred by a stream of carrier gas into a precolumn and then a chromatographic separating column. The CCl3F and CCl2F2 peaks are detected by an electron capture detector (ECD) and their areas are integrated digitally. CFC amounts are calculated using fitted calibration curves, generated by injection of various multiple aliquots of gas standard containing known concentrations of CFCs. Preliminary concentration values for these compounds are printed at the completion of each analysis. Total analysis time for air and water samples is < 10 min, allowing detailed vertical profiles of the concentrations of these compounds in the water column and concentrations in the overlying atmosphere to be determined within a few hours of the completion of a hydrographic station. Typical relative standard deviations for analyses of CCl3F and CCl2F2 in near-surface seawater containing equilibrium levels of these compounds are approximately 1%. Limits of detection for both compounds in 30 cm3 seawater samples are about 0.005 × 10−12 mol kg−1.