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Eckert, SA, Eckert KL, Ponganis P, Kooyman GL.  1989.  Diving and foraging behavior of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea). Canadian Journal of Zoology-Revue Canadienne De Zoologie. 67:2834-2840.   10.1139/z89-399   AbstractWebsite

Remote time–depth recorders (TDR) were deployed on six gravid leatherbacks nesting on Sandy Point, St. Croix. Dive behavior was monitored continuously for each turtle during internesting intervals ranging from 9 to 11 days. Dive duration averaged 9.9 min/dive (SD = 5.3, n = 5096); mean depth was 61.6 m (SD = 59.1, n = 5096). One turtle dived twice beyond the range of her TDR to depths we estimate >1000 m. Postdive surfacing intervals averaged 4.9 min/dive (SD = 13.1, n = 5090). Differences in mean dive depth, dive duration, and surface intervals among turtles were not attributable to differences in body size (length or mass). Distinct diel periodicity was observed in dive behavior; submergence intervals were longest at dawn, declined throughout the day, and were shortest at dusk. Night dives (19:00–04:59) were shorter, shallower, and more frequent than day dives (05:00–18:59). Dive depth was less variable at night than during the day. The dive pattern suggests nocturnal foraging within the deep scattering layer, a hypothesis that is corroborated by seasonal weight loss data.

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Kooyman, GL, Ponganis PJ, Howard RS.  1999.  Diving Animals. The lung at depth. ( Lundgren CEG, Miller JN, Eds.).:587-620., New York: Marcel Dekker Abstract
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McDonald, BI, Ponganis PJ.  2014.  Deep-diving sea lions exhibit extreme bradycardia in long-duration dives. Journal of Experimental Biology. 217:1525-1534.   10.1242/jeb.098558   AbstractWebsite

Heart rate and peripheral blood flow distribution are the primary determinants of the rate and pattern of oxygen store utilisation and ultimately breath-hold duration in marine endotherms. Despite this, little is known about how otariids (sea lions and fur seals) regulate heart rate (f(H)) while diving. We investigated dive f(H) in five adult female California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) during foraging trips by instrumenting them with digital electrocardiogram (ECG) loggers and time depth recorders. In all dives, dive f(H) (number of beats/duration; 50 +/- 9 beats min(-1)) decreased compared with surface rates (113 +/- 5 beats min(-1)), with all dives exhibiting an instantaneous f(H) below resting (<54 beats min(-1)) at some point during the dive. Both dive f(H) and minimum instantaneous f(H) significantly decreased with increasing dive duration. Typical instantaneous f(H) profiles of deep dives (>100 m) consisted of: (1) an initial rapid decline in f(H) resulting in the lowest instantaneous f(H) of the dive at the end of descent, often below 10 beats min-1 in dives longer than 6 min in duration; (2) a slight increase in f(H) to similar to 10-40 beats min(-1) during the bottom portion of the dive; and (3) a gradual increase in f(H) during ascent with a rapid increase prior to surfacing. Thus, f(H) regulation in deep-diving sea lions is not simply a progressive bradycardia. Extreme bradycardia and the presumed associated reductions in pulmonary and peripheral blood flow during late descent of deep dives should (a) contribute to preservation of the lung oxygen store, (b) increase dependence of muscle on the myoglobin-bound oxygen store, (c) conserve the blood oxygen store and (d) help limit the absorption of nitrogen at depth. This f(H) profile during deep dives of sea lions may be characteristic of deep-diving marine endotherms that dive on inspiration as similar f(H) profiles have been recently documented in the emperor penguin, another deep diver that dives on inspiration.

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Ponganis, PJ, Kooyman GL.  2000.  Diving physiology of birds: a history of studies on polar species. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology a-Molecular and Integrative Physiology. 126:143-151.   10.1016/s1095-6433(00)00208-7   AbstractWebsite

Our knowledge of avian diving physiology has been based primarily on research with polar species. Since Scholander's 1940 monograph, research has expanded from examination of the 'diving reflex' to studies of free-diving birds, and has included laboratory investigations of oxygen stores, muscle adaptations, pressure effects, and cardiovascular/metabolic responses to swimming exercise. Behavioral and energetic studies at sea have shown that common diving durations of many avian species exceed the calculated aerobic diving limits (ADL). Current physiological research is focused on factors, such as heart rate and temperature, which potentially affect the diving metabolic rate and duration of aerobic diving. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Ponganis, PJ, Kooyman GL, Castellini MA.  1993.  Determinants of the aerobic dive limit of Weddell seals: analysis of diving metabolic rates, postdive end tidal PO2's, and blood and muscle oxygen stores. Physiological Zoology. 66:732-749. AbstractWebsite

The mean aerobic dive limit (ADL) for Weddell seals was calculated from data collected on diving metabolic rates (VO2) and blood and muscle O2 stores. Mean diving VO2 of adult seals during predominantly exploratory dive patterns was 4.5 mL O2 kg-1 min-1; mean VO2 of a subadult seal engaged in foraging dive bouts was 8.5 mL O2 kg-1 min-1. The adult value was 30% greater than that used in past ADL calculations. Mean plasma volume was 7% body mass (BM); blood volume calculated with the highest hematocrit (Hct) observed (66) was 21% BM. Hemoglobin concentration at such an Hct was 26% by weight. End tidal PO2 (pre- and postdive) justified the use of 95% and 20% arterial O2 saturations in the blood O2 store calculation. Total blood O2 stores were 50% greater than those used in past ADL calculations. Mean myoglobin concentration (5.4% by weight) and more recent anatomical estimates of muscle mass yielded a 35% increase in muscle O2 stores. The mean estimated ADL for a 450-kg seal calculated with these new data was 19.1 min, 2.3 min greater than in past calculations and only 1 min less than the 20-min inflection point of the curve of dive duration versus postdive lactic acid appearance. For the subadult engaged in foraging dives, the mean estimated ADL was about 9 min, again quite similar to past ADL calculations.

Ponganis, PJ.  2011.  Diving Mammals. Comprehensive Physiology. 1: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.   10.1002/cphy.c091003   AbstractWebsite

The ability of diving mammals to forage at depth on a breath hold of air is dependent on gas exchange, both in the lung and in peripheral tissues. Anatomical and physiological adaptations in the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, blood and peripheral tissues contribute to the remarkable breath-hold capacities of these animals. The end results of these adaptations include efficient ventilation, enhanced oxygen storage, regulated transport and delivery of respiratory gases, extreme hypoxemic/ischemic tolerance, and pressure tolerance. © 2011 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 1:447-465, 2011.

Ponganis, PJ, Kreutzer U, Sailasuta N, Knower T, Hurd R, Jue T.  2002.  Detection of myoglobin desaturation in Mirounga angustirostris during apnea. American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 282:R267-R272. AbstractWebsite

H-1 NMR solution-state study of elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) myoglobin (Mb) and hemoglobin (Hb) establishes the temperature-dependent chemical shifts of the proximal histidyl NdeltaH signal, which reflects the respective intracellular and vascular PO2 in vivo. Both proteins exist predominantly in one major isoform and do not exhibit any conformational heterogeneity. The Mb and Hb signals are detectable in M. angustirostris tissue in vivo. During eupnea M. angustirostris muscle maintains a well-saturated MbO(2). However, during apnea, the deoxymyoglobin proximal histidyl NdeltaH signal becomes visible, reflecting a declining tissue PO2. The study establishes a firm methodological basis for using NMR to investigate the metabolic responses during sleep apnea of the elephant seal and to secure insights into oxygen regulation in diving mammals.

Ponganis, PJ, van Dam RP, Knower T, Levenson DH, Ponganis KV.  2004.  Deep dives and aortic temperatures of emperor penguins: new directions for bio-logging at the isolated dive hole. Memoirs of National Institute of Polar Research Special Issue. 58:155-161. AbstractWebsite
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Ponganis, PJ, Starke LN, Horning M, Kooyman GL.  1999.  Development of diving capacity in emperor penguins. Journal of Experimental Biology. 202:781-786. AbstractWebsite

To compare the diving capacities of juvenile and adult emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri, and to determine the physiological variables underlying the diving ability of juveniles, we monitored diving activity in juvenile penguins fitted with satellite-linked time/depth recorders and examined developmental changes in body mass (M-b), hemoglobin concentration, myoglobin (Mb) content and muscle citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase activities, Diving depth, diving duration and time-at-depth histograms were obtained from two fledged juveniles during the first 2.5 months after their departure from the Cape Washingon colony in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. During this period, values of all three diving variables increased progressively. After 8-10 weeks at sea, 24-41% of transmitted maximum diving depths were between 80 and 200 m, Although most dives lasted less than 2 min during the 2 month period, 8-25% of transmitted dives in the last 2 weeks lasted 2-4 min. These values are lower than those previously recorded in adults during foraging trips. Of the physiological variables examined during chick and juvenile development, only M-b and Mb content did not approach adult values, In both near-hedge chicks and juveniles, Mb was 50-60% of adult values and Mb content was 24-31% of adult values. This suggests that the increase in diving capacity of juveniles at sea will be most dependent on changes in these factors.

Ponganis, PJ, Kooyman GL.  1990.  Diving physiology of penguins. Acta XX Congressus Internationalis Ornithologici, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2-9 December 1990. ( Butler PJ, Jones DR, Eds.).:6., Wellington, N.Z.: New Zealand Ornithological Congress Trust Board Abstract
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Shiomi, K, Narazaki T, Sato K, Shimatani K, Arai N, Ponganis PJ, Miyazaki N.  2010.  Data-processing artefacts in three-dimensional dive path reconstruction from geomagnetic and acceleration data. Aquatic Biology. 8:299-304.   10.3354/ab00239   AbstractWebsite

Tri-axis magnetism and acceleration data loggers have recently been used to obtain time-series headings and, consequently, the 3-dimensional dive paths of aquatic animals. However, problems may arise in the resulting calculation process with multiple parameters. In this study, the dive paths of loggerhead turtles and emperor penguins were reconstructed. For both species, apparently unrealistic movements were found. Time-series heading data of turtles showed small regular fluctuations synchronous with stroking. In the dive paths of penguins, infrequent abrupt changes in heading were observed during stroke cycles. These were unlikely to represent true behaviours according to observations of underwater behaviour and tri-axis magnetism and acceleration data. Based on the relationship between sampling frequency and frequency of body posture change, we suggest that (1) the changes in the animals' posture concurrent with strokes and (2) the mismatched treatment (i.e. filtering and non-filtering) of the acceleration and magnetism data caused the artefacts. These inferences are supported by the results of simulations. For data sets obtained at a given sampling frequency, the error pattern in calculated dive paths is likely to differ depending on the frequency and amplitude of body posture changes and in swim speed. In order to avoid misinterpretation, it is necessary to understand the assumptions and inherent problems of the calculation methods as well as the behavioural characteristics of the study animals.