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2018
Pommier, A, Kohlstedt DL, Hansen LN, Mackwell S, Tasaka M, Heidelbach F, Leinenweber K.  2018.  Transport properties of olivine grain boundaries from electrical conductivity experiments. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. 173   10.1007/s00410-018-1468-z   AbstractWebsite

Grain boundary processes contribute significantly to electronic and ionic transports in materials within Earth's interior. We report a novel experimental study of grain boundary conductivity in highly strained olivine aggregates that demonstrates the importance of misorientation angle between adjacent grains on aggregate transport properties. We performed electrical conductivity measurements of melt-free polycrystalline olivine (Fo(90)) samples that had been previously deformed at 1200 degrees C and 0.3 GPa to shear strains up to gamma = 7.3. The electrical conductivity and anisotropy were measured at 2.8 GPa over the temperature range 700-1400 degrees C. We observed that (1) the electrical conductivity of samples with a small grain size (3-6 mu m) and strong crystallographic preferred orientation produced by dynamic recrystallization during large-strain shear deformation is a factor of 10 or more larger than that measured on coarse-grained samples, (2) the sample deformed to the highest strain is the most conductive even though it does not have the smallest grain size, and (3) conductivity is up to a factor of similar to 4 larger in the direction of shear than normal to the shear plane. Based on these results combined with electrical conductivity data for coarse-grained, polycrystalline olivine and for single crystals, we propose that the electrical conductivity of our fine-grained samples is dominated by grain boundary paths. In addition, the electrical anisotropy results from preferential alignment of higher-conductivity grain boundaries associated with the development of a strong crystallographic preferred orientation of the grains.

2011
Pommier, A, Le-Trong E.  2011.  "SIGMELTS": A web portal for electrical conductivity calculations in geosciences. Computers & Geosciences. 37:1450-1459.   10.1016/J.Cageo.2011.01.002   AbstractWebsite

Electrical conductivity measurements in the laboratory are critical for interpreting geoelectric and magnetotelluric profiles of the Earth's crust and mantle. In order to facilitate access to the current database on electrical conductivity of geomaterials, we have developed a freely available web application (SIGMELTS) dedicated to the calculation of electrical properties. Based on a compilation of previous studies, SIGMELTS computes the electrical conductivity of silicate melts, carbonatites, minerals, fluids, and mantle materials as a function of different parameters, such as composition, temperature, pressure, water content, and oxygen fugacity. Calculations on two-phase mixtures are also implemented using existing mixing models for different geometries. An illustration of the use of SIGMELTS is provided, in which calculations are applied to the subduction zone-related volcanic zone in the Central Andes. Along with petrological considerations, field and laboratory electrical data allow discrimination between the different hypotheses regarding the formation and rise from depth of melts and fluids and quantification of their storage conditions. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2010
Pommier, A, Gaillard F, Malki M, Pichavant M.  2010.  Methodological re-evaluation of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts. American Mineralogist. 95:284-291.   10.2138/Am.2010.3314   AbstractWebsite

Electrical impedance measurements in the laboratory oil silicate melts are used to interpret magnetotelluric anomalies. On the basis of 2- and 4-electrode measurements, we show that the influence of the electrodes of the 2-electrode system Oil the measured resistivity call be of significant importance for low-resistivity melts and increases with temperature. At 1400 degrees C, the resistivity of very conductive melts measured with two electrodes call reach six times the resistivity value measured with four electrodes. A short-circuit experiment is needed to correct the 2-electrode data. Electrodes contribution is also estimated for samples from other studies, for which the resistance of the electrical cell call be as high as the resistance of the sample. A correction of the resistivity data from the literature is proposed and Values of the corresponding Arrhenian parameters are recommended.