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Caricchi, L, Pommier A, Pistone M, Castro J, Burgisser A, Perugini D.  2011.  Strain-induced magma degassing: insights from simple-shear experiments on bubble bearing melts. Bulletin of Volcanology. 73:1245-1257.   10.1007/S00445-011-0471-2   AbstractWebsite

Experiments have been performed to determine the effect of deformation on degassing of bubble-bearing melts. Cylindrical specimens of phonolitic composition, initial water content of 1.5 wt.% and 2 vol.% bubbles, have been deformed in simple-shear (torsional configuration) in an internally heated Paterson-type pressure vessel at temperatures of 798-848 K, 100-180 MPa confining pressure and different final strains. Micro-structural analyses of the samples before and after deformation have been performed in two and three dimensions using optical microscopy, a nanotomography machine and synchrotron tomography. The water content of the glasses before and after deformation has been measured using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). In samples strained up to a total of gamma similar to 2 the bubbles record accurately the total strain, whereas at higher strains (gamma similar to 10) the bubbles become very flattened and elongate in the direction of shear. The residual water content of the glasses remains constant up to a strain of gamma similar to 2 and then decreases to about 0.2 wt.% at gamma similar to 10. Results show that strain enhances bubble coalescence and degassing even at low bubble volume-fractions. Noticeably, deformation produced a strongly water under-saturated melt. This suggests that degassing may occur at great depths in the volcanic conduit and may force the magma to become super-cooled early during ascent to the Earth's surface potentially contributing to the genesis of obsidian.

Carporzen, L, Weiss BP, Gilder SA, Pommier A, Hart RJ.  2012.  Lightning remagnetization of the Vredefort impact crater: No evidence for impact-generated magnetic fields. Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets. 117   10.1029/2011je003919   AbstractWebsite

The Vredefort impact crater in South Africa is one of the oldest and largest craters on Earth, making it a unique analog for planetary basins. Intense and randomly oriented remanent magnetization observed in surface samples at Vredefort has been attributed to impact-generated magnetic fields. This possibility has major implications for extraterrestrial paleomagnetism since impact-generated fields have been proposed as a key alternative to the dynamo hypothesis for magnetization on the Moon and asteroids. Furthermore, the presence of single-domain magnetite found along shock-generated planar deformation features in Vredefort granites has been widely attributed to the 2.02 Ga impact event. An alternative hypothesis is that the unusual magnetization and/or rock magnetic properties of Vredefort rocks are the products of recent lightning strikes. Lightning and impact-generated fields can be distinguished by measuring samples collected from below the present surface. Here we present a paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of samples from two 10 m deep vertical boreholes. We show that the magnetization at depth is consistent with a thermoremanent magnetization acquired in the local geomagnetic field following the impact, while random, intense magnetization and some of the unusual rock magnetic properties observed in surface rocks are superficial phenomena produced by lightning. Because Vredefort is the only terrestrial crater that has been proposed to contain records of impact-generated fields, this removes a key piece of evidence in support of the hypothesis that paleomagnetism of the Moon and other extraterrestrial bodies is the product of impacts rather than past core dynamos.