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Markowicz, KM, Flatau PJ, Ramana MV, Crutzen PJ, Ramanathan V.  2002.  Absorbing mediterranean aerosols lead to a large reduction in the solar radiation at the surface. Geophysical Research Letters. 29   10.1029/2002gl015767   AbstractWebsite

[1] We present direct radiometric observations of aerosol radiative forcing taken during the MINOS experiment (2001) at Finokalia Sampling Station located on North-Eastern shores of Crete, Greece. The mean value of aerosol optical thickness was 0.21 at 500 nm. Aerosols, mostly of anthropogenic origin, lead to a diurnal average reduction of 17.9 W m(-2) in the surface solar radiation, an increase of 11.3 W m(-2) in the atmospheric solar absorption, and an increase of 6.6 W m(-2) in the reflected solar radiation at the top-of-the atmosphere. Thus, the present data gives observational proof for the large role of absorbing aerosols in the Mediterranean. The negative surface forcing and large positive atmospheric forcing values observed for the Mediterranean aerosols is nearly identical to the highly absorbing south Asian haze observed over the Arabian Sea.

Markowicz, KM, Flatau PJ, Kardas AE, Remiszewska J, Stelmaszczyk K, Woeste L.  2008.  Ceilometer retrieval of the boundary layer vertical aerosol extinction structure. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 25:928-944.   10.1175/2007jtecha1016.1   AbstractWebsite

The CT25K ceilometer is a general-purpose cloud height sensor employing lidar technology for detection of clouds. In this paper it is shown that it can also be used to retrieve aerosol optical properties in the boundary layer. The authors present a comparison of the CT25K instrument with the aerosol lidar system and discuss its good overall agreement for both the range-corrected signals and the retrieved extinction coefficient profiles. The CT25K aerosol profiling is mostly limited to the boundary layer, but it is capable of detecting events in the lower atmosphere such as mineral dust events between 1 and 3 km. Assumptions needed for the estimation of the aerosol extinction profiles are discussed. It is shown that, when a significant part of the aerosol layer is in the boundary layer, knowledge of the aerosol optical depth from a sun photometer allows inversion of the lidar signal. In other cases, surface observations of the aerosol optical properties are used. It is demonstrated that additional information from a nephelometer and aethalometer allows definition of the lidar ratio. Extinction retrievals based on spherical and randomly oriented spheroid assumptions are performed. It is shown, by comparison with the field measurements during the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment, that an assumption about specific particle shape is important for the extinction profile inversions. The authors indicate that this limitation of detection is a result of the relatively small sensitivity of this instrument in comparison to more sophisticated aerosol lidars. However, in many cases this does not play a significant role because globally only about 20% of the aerosol optical depth is above the boundary layer.

Markowicz, KM, Flatau PJ, Vogelmann AM, Quinn PK, Welton EJ.  2003.  Clear-sky infrared aerosol radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 129:2927-2947.   10.1256/qj.02.224   AbstractWebsite

We study the aerosol radiative forcing at infrared (IR) wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment. ACE-Asia, cruise of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The analyses apply to the daytime periods of clear-sky conditions for the area within the immediate vicinity of the ship. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible-extinction measurements, which are used to estimate the IR aerosol optical thickness and the single-scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier transform interferometer-based IR aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer-based IR downward fluxes, and to observations of the direct aerosol solar forcing. This combined approach attests to the self-consistency of the optical model, and allows us to derive quantities such as the IR forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the IR optical thickness. The mean IR aerosol optical thickness at 10 mum is 0.08 and the single-scattering albedo is 0.55. The modelled IR aerosol surface forcing reaches 10 W m(-2) during the cruise, which is a significant contribution compared to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface IR aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 and 25% of the short-wave aerosol forcing. The IR aerosol forcing at the TOA can be up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between TOA aerosol IR forcing derived from the model and from the CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) satellite data. Over the Sea of Japan, the average IR aerosol radiative forcing is 4.6 W m(-2) at the surface. and 1.5 W m(-2) at the TOA. The IR forcing efficiency at the TOA is a strong function of aerosol temperature (which is coupled to vertical structure) and changes between 10 and 18 W m(-2) (per IR optical depth unit), while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W m(-2) (per IR optical depth unit).

Lelieveld, J, Berresheim H, Borrmann S, Crutzen PJ, Dentener FJ, Fischer H, Feichter J, Flatau PJ, Heland J, Holzinger R, Korrmann R, Lawrence MG, Levin Z, Markowicz KM, Mihalopoulos N, Minikin A, Ramanathan V, de Reus M, Roelofs GJ, Scheeren HA, Sciare J, Schlager H, Schultz M, Siegmund P, Steil B, Stephanou EG, Stier P, Traub M, Warneke C, Williams J, Ziereis H.  2002.  Global air pollution crossroads over the Mediterranean. Science. 298:794-799.   10.1126/science.1075457   AbstractWebsite

The Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study, performed in the summer of 2001, uncovered air pollution layers from the surface to an altitude of 15 kilometers. In the boundary layer, air pollution standards are exceeded throughout the region, caused by West and East European pollution from the north. Aerosol particles also reduce solar radiation penetration to the surface, which can suppress precipitation. In the middle troposphere, Asian and to a lesser extent North American pollution is transported from the west. Additional Asian pollution from the east, transported from the monsoon in the upper troposphere, crosses the Mediterranean tropopause, which pollutes the lower stratosphere at middle latitudes.

Baranowski, DB, Flatau MK, Flatau PJ, Matthews AJ.  2016.  Impact of atmospheric convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin waves on upper ocean variability. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. 121:2045-2059.   10.1002/2015JD024150   Abstract

Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) are atmospheric weather systems that propagate eastward along the equatorial wave guide with phase speeds between 11 and 14 m s−1. They are an important constituent of the convective envelope of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), for which ocean-atmosphere interactions play a vital role. Hence, ocean-atmosphere interactions within CCKWs may be important for MJO development and prediction and for tropical climate, in general. Although the atmospheric structure of CCKWs has been well studied, their impact on the underlying ocean is unknown. In this paper, the ocean-atmosphere interactions in CCKWs are investigated by a case study from November 2011 during the CINDY/DYNAMO field experiment, using in situ oceanographic measurements from an ocean glider. The analysis is then extended to a 15 year period using precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and surface fluxes from the TropFlux analysis. A methodology is developed to calculate trajectories of CCKWs. CCKW events are strongly controlled by the MJO, with twice as many CCKWs observed during the convectively active phase of the MJO compared to the suppressed phase. Coherent ocean-atmosphere interaction is observed during the passage of a CCKW, which lasts approximately 4 days at any given longitude. Surface wind speed and latent heat flux are enhanced, leading to a transient suppression of the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) and a sustained decrease in bulk SST of 0.1°C. Given that a typical composite mean MJO SST anomaly is of the order of 0.3°C, and more than one CCKW can occur during the active phase of a single MJO event, the oceanographic impact of CCKWs is of major importance to the MJO cycle.

Markowicz, KM, Flatau PJ, Quinn PK, Carrico CM, Flatau MK, Vogelmann AM, Bates D, Liu M, Rood MJ.  2003.  Influence of relative humidity on aerosol radiative forcing: An ACE-Asia experiment perspective. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 108   10.1029/2002jd003066   AbstractWebsite

We present direct radiometric observations of aerosol radiative forcing during the ACE-Asia experiment (March and April of 2001). The observational analysis is based on radiometer data obtained from the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown, and shipboard measurements of the aerosol chemical and scattering properties are used to construct a model of the aerosol optical properties for use in radiative transfer calculations. The model is validated against the radiometric observations and is used to diagnose the aerosol and environmental factors that contribute to the observed forcings. The mean value of aerosol optical thickness observed during the ACE-Asia cruise over the Sea of Japan was 0.43 (+/-0.25) at 500 nm, while the single-scattering albedo was 0.95 (+/-0.03) at ambient relative humidity. We find a large correlation (r(2) = 0.69) between single-scattering albedo and relative humidity. Aerosols caused a mean decrease in the diurnally averaged solar radiation of 26.1 W m(-2) at the surface, while increasing the atmospheric solar absorption and top of atmosphere reflected solar radiation by 13.4 W m(-2) and 12.7 W m(-2), respectively. The mean surface aerosol forcing efficiency (forcing per unit optical depth) over the Sea of Japan was -60 W m(-2) and is influenced by high values of relative humidity. We show that decreasing the relative humidity to 55% enhances the aerosol forcing efficiency by as much as 6-10 W m(-2). This dependency on relative humidity has implications for comparisons of aerosol forcing efficiencies between different geographical locations.

Welton, EJ, Voss KJ, Quinn PK, Flatau PJ, Markowicz K, Campbell JR, Spinhirne JD, Gordon HR, Johnson JE.  2002.  Measurements of aerosol vertical profiles and optical properties during INDOEX 1999 using micropulse lidars. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 107   10.1029/2000jd000038   AbstractWebsite

[1] Micropulse lidar (MPL) systems were used to measure aerosol properties during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship R/V Ronald H. Brown, and the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) in the Maldives. Sun photometers were used to provide aerosol optical depths (AOD) needed to calibrate the MPL. This study focuses on the height distribution and optical properties (at 523 nm) of aerosols observed during the campaign. The height of the highest aerosols (top height) was calculated and found to be below 4 km for most of the cruise. The marine boundary layer (MBL) top was calculated and found to be less than 1 km. MPL results were combined with air mass trajectories, radiosonde profiles of temperature and humidity, and aerosol concentration and optical measurements. Humidity varied from approximately 80% near the surface to 50% near the top height during the entire cruise. The average value and standard deviation of aerosol optical parameters were determined for characteristic air mass regimes. Marine aerosols in the absence of any continental influence were found to have an AOD of 0.05+/-0.03, an extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S ratio) of 33+/-6 sr, and peak extinction values around 0.05 km(-1) (near the MBL top). The marine results are shown to be in agreement with previously measured and expected values. Polluted marine areas over the Indian Ocean, influenced by continental aerosols, had AOD values in excess of 0.2, S ratios well above 40 sr, and peak extinction values approximately 0.20 km(-1) (near the MBL top). The polluted marine results are shown to be similar to previously published values for continental aerosols. Comparisons between MPL derived extinction near the ship (75 m) and extinction calculated at ship level using scattering measured by a nephelometer and absorption using a particle soot absorption photometer were conducted. The comparisons indicated that the MPL algorithm (using a constant S ratio throughout the lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.

Conant, WC, Seinfeld JH, Wang J, Carmichael GR, Tang YH, Uno I, Flatau PJ, Markowicz KM, Quinn PK.  2003.  A model for the radiative forcing during ACE-Asia derived from CIRPAS Twin Otter and R/V Ronald H. Brown data and comparison with observations. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 108   10.1029/2002jd003260   AbstractWebsite

Vertical profiles of aerosol size, composition, and hygroscopic behavior from Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration R/V Ronald H. Brown observations are used to construct a generic optical model of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) aerosol. The model accounts for sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust. The effects of relative humidity and mixing assumptions (internal versus external, coating of dust by pollutants) are explicitly accounted for. The aerosol model is integrated with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute direct radiative forcing in the solar spectrum. The predicted regional average surface aerosol forcing efficiency (change in clear-sky radiative flux per unit aerosol optical depth at 500 nm) during the ACE-Asia intensive period is -65 Wm(-2) for pure dust and -60 Wm(-2) for pure pollution aerosol (clear skies). A three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model (Chemical Weather Forecast System (CFORS)) is used with the radiative transfer model to derive regional radiative forcing during ACE-Asia in clear and cloudy skies. Net regional solar direct radiative forcing during the 5-15 April 2001 dust storm period is -3 Wm(-2) at the top of the atmosphere and -17 Wm(-2) at the surface for the region from 20degreesN to 50degreesN and 100degreesE to 150degreesE when the effects of clouds on the direct forcing are included. The model fluxes and forcing efficiencies are found to be in good agreement with surface radiometric observations made aboard the R. H. Brown. Mean cloud conditions are found to moderate the top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing by a factor of similar to3 compared to clear-sky calculations, but atmospheric absorption by aerosol is not strongly affected by clouds in this study. The regional aerosol effect at the TOA ("climate forcing") of -3 Wm(-2) is comparable in magnitude, but of opposite sign, to present-day anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing. The forcing observed during ACE-Asia is similar in character to that seen during other major field experiments downwind of industrial and biomass black carbon sources (e.g., the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)), insofar as the primary effect of aerosol is to redistribute solar heating from the surface to the atmosphere.

Remiszewska, J, Flatau PJ, Markowicz KM, Reid EA, Reid JS, Witek ML.  2007.  Modulation of the aerosol absorption and single-scattering albedo due to synoptic scale and sea breeze circulations: United Arab Emirates experiment perspective. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 112   10.1029/2006jd007139   AbstractWebsite

The spectral aerosol absorption properties in the Arabian Gulf region were observed during the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE(2)). Measurements were taken at a coastal region of the Arabian Gulf located 60 km northeast of Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, allowing characterization of pollution and dust absorption properties in a highly heterogeneous environment. A large observed change of the diurnal signal during the period under study ( 27 August through 30 September 2004) was due to ( 1) strong sea and land breeze and ( 2) changes in prevailing synoptic-scale flow. During the night, stagnating air resulted in gradual accumulation of pollution with maximum absorption in the early morning hours. The rising sun increased both the depth of the boundary layer and the temperature of the interior desert, resulting in strong and sudden sea breeze onset which ventilated the polluted air accumulated during the night. Our observations show that the onshore winds brought cleaner air resulting in decreasing values of the absorption coefficient and increasing values of the single-scattering albedo (SSA). The mean value of the absorption coefficient at 550 nm measured during the sea breeze was 10.2 +/- 0.9 Mm(-1), while during the land breeze it was 13.8 +/- 1.2 Mm(-1). Synoptic- scale transport also strongly influenced particle fine/ coarse partition with "northern'' flow bringing pollution particles and "southern'' flow bringing more dust.

Witek, ML, Flatau PJ, Teixeira J, Markowicz KM.  2011.  Numerical Investigation of Sea Salt Aerosol Size Bin Partitioning in Global Transport Models: Implications for Mass Budget and Optical Depth. Aerosol Science and Technology. 45:401-414.   10.1080/02786826.2010.541957   AbstractWebsite

In this study the importance of sea salt aerosol (SSA) size representation in a global transport model is investigated. For this purpose the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) model is employed in a number of SSA simulations. A new dry deposition velocity parameterization is implemented into NAAPS in order to more physically represent deposition processes in the model. SSA size distribution is divided into size bins using two different partition procedures: the previously used iso-log method and the iso-gradient method, which relies on size-dependence of deposition processes. The global SSA simulations are analyzed in terms of the total sea salt mass and the average SSA optical thickness. The results indicate that there is a large dependence of the total mass and average aerosol optical depth on the number of size bins used to represent the aerosol size distribution. The total SSA mass is underestimated by 20% if 2 instead of 15 (reference) size intervals are used. The average aerosol optical depth underestimation is even higher and reaches over 35%. Such large differences can have substantial implications on the accuracy of SSA radiative forcing simulations in climate models. A comparison of the two division procedures shows that the simulations with the iso-gradient intervals are more accurate than the iso-log ones if at least 6 size bins are used. This result indicates that the more physically based division scheme can offer better performance and reduce computational cost of global aerosol transport models.

Markowicz, KM, Flatau PJ, Remiszewska J, Witek M, Reid EA, Reid JS, Bucholtz A, Holben B.  2008.  Observations and modeling of the surface aerosol radiative forcing during UAE(2). Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 65:2877-2891.   10.1175/2007jas2555.1   AbstractWebsite

Aerosol radiative forcing in the Persian Gulf region is derived from data collected during the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE(2)). This campaign took place in August and September of 2004. The land -sea-breeze circulation modulates the diurnal variability of the aerosol properties and aerosol radiative forcing at the surface. Larger aerosol radiative forcing is observed during the land breeze in comparison to the sea breeze. The aerosol optical properties change as the onshore wind brings slightly cleaner air. The mean diurnal value of the surface aerosol forcing during the UAE2 campaign is about -20 W m(-2), which corresponds to large aerosol optical thickness (0.45 at 500 nm). The aerosol forcing efficiency [i. e., broadband shortwave forcing per unit optical depth at 550 nm, W m(-2) (tau(500))(-1)] is -53 W m(-2) (tau(500))(-1) and the average single scattering albedo is 0.93 at 550 nm.

Vogelmann, AM, Flatau PJ, Szczodrak M, Markowicz KM, Minnett PJ.  2003.  Observations of large aerosol infrared forcing at the surface. Geophysical Research Letters. 30   10.1029/2002gl016829   AbstractWebsite

Studies of aerosol effects on the Earth's energy budget usually consider only the cooling effects at short (solar) wavelengths, but we demonstrate that they also have important warming effects at thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths that have rarely been observed and are commonly ignored in climate models. We use high-resolution spectra to obtain the IR radiative forcing at the surface for aerosols encountered in the outflow from northeastern Asia. The spectra were measured by the Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) from the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia). We show that the daytime surface IR forcing are often a few Wm(-2) and can reach almost 10 Wm(-2) for large aerosol loadings. Thus, even the smaller aerosol IR forcing observed here are comparable to or greater than the 1 to 2 Wm(-2) IR surface enhancement from increases in greenhouse gases. These results highlight the importance of aerosol IR forcing which should be included in climate model simulations.

Maslowska, A, Flatau PJ, Stephens GL.  1994.  On the Validity of the Anomalous Diffraction Theory to Light-Scattering by Cubes. Optics Communications. 107:35-40.   10.1016/0030-4018(94)90099-x   AbstractWebsite

The extinction and absorption efficiencies of a cube at light incidence normal to its four-fold symmetry axis are calculated using the anomalous diffraction theory (ADT). The results are compared with those based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). It is shown that for certain cases of the orientation of a cube relative to the direction of the incident light the extinction efficiency calculated using DDA and ADT do not agree. However, the ADT-based absorption efficiencies for the cases studied are dependent on a particle volume and exhibit smaller errors. Hence the validity of the ADT for cubes is not as good as for spheres.

Baranowski, DB, Flatau MK, Flatau PJ, Matthews AJ.  2016.  Phase locking between atmospheric convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin waves and the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent. Geophysical Research Letters. 43:8269-8276.   10.1002/2016gl069602   AbstractWebsite

Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) are a major component of the tropical atmospheric circulation, propagating eastward around the equatorial belt. Here we show that there are scale interactions between CCKWs and the diurnal cycle over the Maritime Continent. In particular, CCKW packets that pass a base point in the eastern Indian Ocean at 90 degrees E between 0600 and 0900UTC subsequently arrive over Sumatra in phase with the diurnal cycle of convection. As the distance between Sumatra and Borneo is equal to the distance traveled by a CCKW in 1day, these waves are then also in phase with the diurnal cycle over Borneo. Consequently, this subset of CCKWs has a precipitation signal up to a factor of 3 larger than CCKWs that arrive at other times of the day and a 40% greater chance of successfully traversing the Maritime Continent.

Flatau, PJ, Flatau M, Zaneveld JRV, Mobley CD.  2000.  Remote sensing of bubble clouds in sea water. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 126:2511-2523.   10.1256/smsqj.56807   AbstractWebsite

We report on the influence of submerged bubble clouds on the remote-sensing properties of water. We show that the optical effect of bubbles on radiative transfer and on the estimate of the ocean colour is significant. We present a global map of the volume fraction of air in water derived from daily wind speed data. This map. together with the parametrization of the microphysical properties, shows the possible significance of bubble clouds on the albedo to incoming solar energy.

Flatau, PJ, Fuller KA, Mackowski DW.  1993.  Scattering by 2 Spheres in Contact - Comparisons between Discrete-Dipole Approximation and Modal-Analysis. Applied Optics. 32:3302-3305.   10.1364/AO.32.003302   AbstractWebsite

This paper applies two different techniques to the problem of scattering by two spheres in contact: modal analysis, which is an exact method, and the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA). Good agreement is obtained, which further demonstrates the utility of the DDA to scattering problems for irregular particles. The choice of the DDA polarizability scheme is discussed in detail. We show that the lattice dispersion relation provides excellent improvement over the Clausius-Mossoti polarizability parameterization.

Matthews, AJ, Baranowski DB, Heywood KJ, Flatau PJ, Schmidtko S.  2014.  The surface diurnal warm layer in the Indian Ocean during CINDY/DYNAMO. Journal of Climate. 27:9101-9122.   10.1175/jcli-d-14-00222.1   AbstractWebsite

A surface diurnal warm layer is diagnosed from Seaglider observations and develops on half of the days in the Cooperative Indian Ocean Experiment on Intraseasonal Variability/Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (CINDY/DYNAMO) Indian Ocean experiment. The diurnal warm layer occurs on days of high solar radiation flux (>80 W m(-2)) and low wind speed (<6 ms(-1)) and preferentially in the inactive stage of the Madden-Julian oscillation. Its diurnal harmonic has an exponential vertical structure with a depth scale of 4-5m (dependent on chlorophyll concentration), consistent with forcing by absorption of solar radiation. The effective sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly due to the diurnal warm layer often reaches 0.8 degrees C in the afternoon, with a daily mean of 0.2 degrees C, rectifying the diurnal cycle onto longer time scales. This SST anomaly drives an anomalous flux of 4Wm(-2) that cools the ocean. Alternatively, in a climate model where this process is unresolved, this represents an erroneous flux that warms the ocean. A simple model predicts a diurnal warm layer to occur on 30%-50% of days across the tropical warm pool. On the remaining days, with low solar radiation and high wind speeds, a residual diurnal cycle is observed by the Seaglider, with a diurnal harmonic of temperature that decreases linearly with depth. As wind speed increases, this already weak temperature gradient decreases further, tending toward isothermal conditions.