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Shen, WS, Wiens DA, Anandakrishnan S, Aster RC, Gerstoft P, Bromirski PD, Hansen SE, Dalziel IWD, Heeszel DS, Huerta AD, Nyblade AA, Stephen R, Wilson TJ, Winberry JP.  2018.  The crust and upper mantle structure of central and west Antarctica from bayesian inversion of rayleigh wave and receiver functions. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 123:7824-7849.   10.1029/2017jb015346   AbstractWebsite

We construct a new seismic model for central and West Antarctica by jointly inverting Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities along with P wave receiver functions. Ambient noise tomography exploiting data from more than 200 seismic stations deployed over the past 18years is used to construct Rayleigh wave phase and group velocity dispersion maps. Comparison between the ambient noise phase velocity maps with those constructed using teleseismic earthquakes confirms the accuracy of both results. These maps, together with P receiver function waveforms, are used to construct a new 3-D shear velocity (Vs) model for the crust and uppermost mantle using a Bayesian Monte Carlo algorithm. The new 3-D seismic model shows the dichotomy of the tectonically active West Antarctica (WANT) and the stable and ancient East Antarctica (EANT). In WANT, the model exhibits a slow uppermost mantle along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) front, interpreted as the thermal effect from Cenozoic rifting. Beneath the southern TAMs, the slow uppermost mantle extends horizontally beneath the traditionally recognized EANT, hypothesized to be associated with lithospheric delamination. Thin crust and lithosphere observed along the Amundsen Sea coast and extending into the interior suggest involvement of these areas in Cenozoic rifting. EANT, with its relatively thick and cold crust and lithosphere marked by high Vs, displays a slower Vs anomaly beneath the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains in the uppermost mantle, which we hypothesize may be the signature of a compositionally anomalous body, perhaps remnant from a continental collision.

Stephen, RA, Duennebier FK, Harris D, Jolly J, Bolmer ST, Bromirski PD.  2006.  Broadband seismic observations at the Hawaii-2 Observatory, ODP Leg 200. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results. 200   10.2973/odp.proc.sr.200.007.2006   AbstractWebsite

Among the groups of oceanic microfossils, only Radiolaria occur in abundances and preservation states sufficient to provide biostratigraphic control for restricted intervals within sediments recovered in Hole 1223A. The distribution of these microfossils has been divided into four major intervals, A-D. Radiolaria distribution Interval A occupies the depth range 0-3.0 meters below seafloor (mbsf), where the abundance of specimens is very low and preservation is poor. Radiolaria distribution Interval B occupies the depth range 3.02-7.1 mbsf. Radiolaria in Interval B are locally rare to abundant and well preserved, and assemblages range in age from pure early Eocene to early Eocene admixed with late Neogene taxa. Radiolaria distribution Interval C occupies the depth range 7.1-36.99 mbsf and is characterized by sediments either barren of microfossils or containing extremely rare early Eocene specimens. Radiolaria distribution Interval D occupies the depth range 36.99-38.7 mbsf (base of the recovered sedimentary section), where early Eocene Radiolaria are present in rare to common frequencies, but opal-A to opal-CT recrystallization has degraded the preservation state. The late Neogene assemblage of Radiolaria distribution Interval B is dated at 1.55-2.0 Ma, based on occurrences of Eucyrtidium matuyamai, Lamprocyclas heteroporos, and Theocorythium trachelium trachelium. The early Eocene assemblage of Radiolaria distribution Intervals B and D is somewhat problematically assigned to the Buryella clinata Zone.