Publications

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2017
Landro, M, Zumberge M.  2017.  Estimating saturation and density changes caused by CO2 injection at Sleipner - Using time-lapse seismic amplitude-variation-with-offset and time-lapse gravity. Interpretation-a Journal of Subsurface Characterization. 5:T243-T257.   10.1190/int-2016-0120.1   AbstractWebsite

We have developed a calibrated, simple time-lapse seismic method for estimating saturation changes from the CO2-storage project at Sleipner offshore Norway. This seismic method works well to map changes when CO2 is migrating laterally away from the injection point. However, it is challenging to detect changes occurring below CO2 layers that have already been charged by some CO2. Not only is this partly caused by the seismic shadow effects, but also by the fact that the velocity sensitivity for CO2 change in saturation from 0.3 to 1.0 is significantly less than saturation changes from zero to 0.3. To circumvent the seismic shadow zone problem, we combine the time-lapse seismic method with time-lapse gravity measurements. This is done by a simple forward modeling of gravity changes based on the seismically derived saturation changes, letting these saturation changes be scaled by an arbitrary constant and then by minimizing the least-squares error to obtain the best fit between the scaled saturation changes and the measured time-lapse gravity data. In this way, we are able to exploit the complementary properties of time-lapse seismic and gravity data.

2004
Elsberg, DH, Harrison WD, Zumberge MA, Morack JL, Pettit EC, Waddington ED, Husmann E.  2004.  Depth- and time-dependent vertical strain rates at Siple Dome, Antarctica. Journal of Glaciology. 50:511-521.   10.3189/172756504781829684   AbstractWebsite

As part of a project to investigate the flow of ice at low effective stress, two independent strain-gauge systems were used to measure vertical strain rate as a function of depth and time at Siple Dome, Antarctica. The measurements were made from January 1998 until January 2002 at the ice divide and a site 7km to the northeast on the flank. The strain-rate profiles place constraints on the rheology of ice at low stress, show the expected differences between divide and flank flow (with some structure due to firn compaction and probably ice stratigraphy), and suggest that the flow of the ice sheet has not changed much in the last 8.6kyr. The strain rates show an unexpected time dependence on scales ranging from several months to hours, including discrete summer events at the divide. Time dependence in strain rate, water pressure, seismicity, velocity and possibly basal motion has been seen previously on the Siple Coast ice streams, but it is especially surprising on Siple Dome because the bed is cold.