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Mitchell, BG, Kahru M.  1998.  Algorithms for SeaWiFS standard products developed with the CalCOFI big-optical data set. California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations Reports. 39:133-147. AbstractWebsite

Funding from NASA's Ocean Biogeochemistry Program and the Goddard Space Flight Center SeaWiFS Project was used to implement an ocean optics program as part of the routine cruises of the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI). Since August 1993, data from more than 300 bio-optical stations have been acquired, merged with complementary data, and made available for developing remote sensing algorithms. The profiling instrument consisted of a Biospherical Instruments, Inc. MER-2040/2041 radiometer integrated with CTD probes, a transmissometer, and a fluorometer. A detailed calibration time series of the radiance and irradiance sensors has been maintained to ensure maximum accuracy. The data set has been used to develop empirical algorithms for Sea WiFS standard products including chlorophyll a (chl a), "CZCS pigments," and diffuse attenuation coefficient K-d(490). Algorithms using cubic regressions of remote sensing reflectance (R-rs) ratios provided the best estimation of chi a and pigments over the full range of chl a (0.05-22.3 mg m(-3)). Multiple linear regressions of multiple-band ratios proved to be less robust. Relationships between spectral K and chi a suggest that previous K algorithms may have errors due to estimates of pure-water absorption.

Frants, M, Gille ST, Hatta M, Hiscock WT, Kahru M, Measures CI, Mitchell BG, Zhou M.  2013.  Analysis of horizontal and vertical processes contributing to natural iron supply in the mixed layer in southern Drake Passage. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 90:68-76.   10.1016/j.dsr2.2012.06.001   AbstractWebsite

Horizontal advection, vertical mixing, and mixed-layer entrainment all affect iron concentrations and biological productivity in the Ona Basin, near the Shackleton Transverse Ridge (STR) in southern Drake Passage. Trace metal sampling in the region indicates that dissolved iron concentrations are significantly higher on the continental shelf near the Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands than they are in the deep waters away from the shelf. Comparisons between satellite-derived sea surface height (SSH) and Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) levels in the Ona Basin show > 95% correlation between Chl-a concentrations and horizontal advection of these iron-rich shelf waters during the months of November and December for the years 1997-2010. However, no significant correlations are found for January-April, while high Chl-a concentrations in the Ona Basin persist through March. Enhanced vertical (diapycnal) mixing and mixed-layer entrainment are considered as alternative mechanisms for delivering iron into the Ona Basin mixed layer and sustaining the high Chl-a concentrations. Estimates of iron flux based on in situ measurements of dissolved iron concentrations suggest that diapycnal mixing alone can supply iron to the base of the mixed layer at a rate of 64 +/- 2 nmol m(-2) day(-1) during the summer. In addition, the summer mixed layer in the Ona Basin deepens from January to April, allowing for iron-rich water to be steadily entrained from below. Estimates based on monthly mixed-layer climatologies produce average daily entrainment rates ranging from 5 to 25 nmol m(-2) day(-1). While neither diapycnal mixing nor entrainment alone is always sufficient to meet the estimated iron demand for the Ona Basin bloom, numerical simulation suggests that the combined effect of the two processes can consistently supply sufficient iron to sustain the bloom. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Kahru, M, Kaasik E, Leeben A.  1991.  Annual Cycle of Particle-Size Fractions and Phytoplankton Biomass in the Northern Baltic Proper. Marine Ecology-Progress Series. 69:117-124.   10.3354/meps069117   AbstractWebsite

A large data set of particle concentrations in the range 1 to 1000-mu-m, chlorophyll a, and associated measurements from the surface waters of the northern Baltic proper during 1985 to 1989 was analyzed to construct spatially and temporally averaged annual time curves of particle size fractions and phytoplankton biomass. Chlorophyll a concentration was well correlated with the 28-73-mu-m size fraction and had 2 seasonal peaks: in April-May, corresponding to the diatom spring bloom, and in August, corresponding to the late-summer bloom of blue-green algae. The 2 maxima were separated by the early summer minimum when the 1-10-mu-m particle fractions corresponding to a mixed assemblage of small phytoplankton and microheterotrophs reached their maxima. The largest particles (163-1000-mu-m), corresponding to smaller mesozooplankton, reached their maximum in July-August before the blue-green maximum. Automated particle counting is well suited for routine monitoring of pelagic systems as it reveals all major shifts in the planktonic community.

Kahru, M, Brotas V, Manzano-Sarabia M, Mitchell BG.  2011.  Are phytoplankton blooms occurring earlier in the Arctic? Global Change Biology. 17:1733-1739.   10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02312.x   AbstractWebsite

Time series of satellite-derived surface chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl) in 1997-2009 were used to examine for trends in the timing of the annual phytoplankton bloom maximum. Significant trends towards earlier phytoplankton blooms were detected in about 11% of the area of the Arctic Ocean with valid Chl data, e.g. in the Hudson Bay, Foxe Basin, Baffin Sea, off the coasts of Greenland, in the Kara Sea and around Novaya Zemlya. These areas roughly coincide with areas where ice concentration has decreased in early summer (June), thus making the earlier blooms possible. In the selected areas, the annual phytoplankton bloom maximum has advanced by up to 50 days which may have consequences for the Arctic food chain and carbon cycling. Outside the Arctic, the annual Chl maximum has become earlier in boreal North Pacific but later in the North Atlantic.

Vasilkov, AP, Herman JR, Ahmad Z, Kahru M, Mitchell BG.  2005.  Assessment of the ultraviolet radiation field in ocean waters from space-based measurements and full radiative-transfer calculations. Applied Optics. 44:2863-2869.   10.1364/ao.44.002863   AbstractWebsite

(quantitative assessment of the UV effects on aquatic ecosystems requires an estimate of the in-water radiation field. Actual ocean UV reflectances are needed for improving the total ozone retrievals from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and the ozone monitoring instrument (OMI) flown on NASA's Aura satellite. The estimate of underwater UV radiation can be done on the basis of measurements from the TOMS/OMI and full models of radiative transfer (RT) in the atmosphere-ocean system. The Hydrolight code, modified for extension to the UV, is used for the generation of look-up tables for in-water irradiances. A look-up table for surface radiances generated with a full RT code is input for the Hydrolight simulations. A model of seawater inherent optical properties (IOPs) is an extension of the Case 1 water model to the UV. A new element of the IOP model is parameterization of particulate matter absorption based on recent in situ data. A chlorophyll product from ocean color sensors is input for the IOP model. Verification of the in-water computational scheme shows that the calculated diffuse attenuation coefficient K-d is in good agreement with the measured K-d. © 2005 Optical Society of America.

Lin, JF, Lee Z, Ondrusek M, Kahru M.  2016.  Attenuation coefficient of usable solar radiation of the global oceans. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 121:3228-3236.   10.1002/2015jc011528   AbstractWebsite

Usable solar radiation (USR) represents spectrally integrated solar energy in the spectral range of 400-560 nm, a domain where photons penetrate the most in oceanic waters and thus contribute to photosynthesis and heating at deeper depths. Through purely numerical simulations, it was found that the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling USR (K-d(USR), m(-1)) is nearly a constant vertically in the upper water column for clear waters and most turbid waters. Subsequently an empirical model was developed to estimate Kd(USR) based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd(490), m(-1)). We here evaluate this relationship using data collected from a wide range of oceanic and coastal environments and found that the relationship between Kd(490) and Kd(USR) developed via the numerical simulation is quite robust. We further refined this relationship to extend the applicability to "clearest" natural waters. This refined relationship was then used to produce sample distribution of Kd(USR) of global oceans. As expected, extremely low Kd(USR) (similar to 0.02 m(-1)) was observed in ocean gyres, while significantly higher Kd(USR) (similar to 5.2 m(-1)) was found in very turbid coastal regions. A useful application of Kd(USR) is to easily and accurately propagate surface USR to deeper depths, potentially to significantly improve the estimation of basin scale primary production and heat fluxes in the upper water column.

Ohman, MD, Rudnick DL, Chekalyuk A, Davis RE, Feely RA, Kahru M, Kim HJ, Landry MR, Martz TR, Sabine CL, Send U.  2013.  Autonomous ocean measurements in the California Current ecosystem. Oceanography. 26:18-25. AbstractWebsite

Event-scale phenomena, of limited temporal duration or restricted spatial extent, often play a disproportionately large role in ecological processes occurring in the ocean water column. Nutrient and gas fluxes, upwelling and downwelling, transport of biogeochemically important elements, predator-prey interactions, and other processes may be markedly influenced by such events, which are inadequately resolved from infrequent ship surveys. The advent of autonomous instrumentation, including underwater gliders, profiling floats, surface drifters, enhanced moorings, coastal high-frequency radars, and satellite remote sensing, now provides the capability to resolve such phenomena and assess their role in structuring pelagic ecosystems. These methods are especially valuable when integrated together, and with shipboard calibration measurements and experimental programs.