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Frants, M, Gille ST, Hewes CD, Holm-Hansen O, Kahru M, Lombrozo A, Measures CI, Mitchell BG, Wang HL, Zhou M.  2013.  Optimal multiparameter analysis of source water distributions in the Southern Drake Passage. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 90:31-42.   10.1016/j.dsr2.2012.06.002   AbstractWebsite

In order to evaluate the effects of horizontal advection on iron supply in the vicinity of the Shackleton Transverse Ridge (SIR) in the southern Drake Passage, the water composition in the region is estimated along the isopycnal containing the subsurface iron peak. Optimal Multiparameter (OMP) analysis of temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrient data is used to estimate the water composition at CID stations sampled in summer 2004 and winter 2006. The highest iron concentrations in the Ona Basin are found below the mixed layer, both in summer and in winter. The water composition derived from the OMP analysis is consistent with a scenario in which iron-rich shelf waters from the South Shetland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula are advected northward on the eastern side of the SIR, where they interact with the low-iron waters of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) in the Ona Basin. The shelf waters and the ACC waters appear to interact through a stirring process without fully mixing, resulting in a filamented distribution that has also been inferred from the satellite data. To the west of the STR, the shelf waters are primarily confined to the continental shelf, and do not extend northwards. This source of water distribution is consistent with the idea that iron enters the Ona Basin from the continental shelf through advection along an isopycnal, resulting in an iron concentration peak occurring below the winter mixed layer in the Ona Basin. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Frants, M, Gille ST, Hatta M, Hiscock WT, Kahru M, Measures CI, Mitchell BG, Zhou M.  2013.  Analysis of horizontal and vertical processes contributing to natural iron supply in the mixed layer in southern Drake Passage. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 90:68-76.   10.1016/j.dsr2.2012.06.001   AbstractWebsite

Horizontal advection, vertical mixing, and mixed-layer entrainment all affect iron concentrations and biological productivity in the Ona Basin, near the Shackleton Transverse Ridge (STR) in southern Drake Passage. Trace metal sampling in the region indicates that dissolved iron concentrations are significantly higher on the continental shelf near the Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands than they are in the deep waters away from the shelf. Comparisons between satellite-derived sea surface height (SSH) and Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) levels in the Ona Basin show > 95% correlation between Chl-a concentrations and horizontal advection of these iron-rich shelf waters during the months of November and December for the years 1997-2010. However, no significant correlations are found for January-April, while high Chl-a concentrations in the Ona Basin persist through March. Enhanced vertical (diapycnal) mixing and mixed-layer entrainment are considered as alternative mechanisms for delivering iron into the Ona Basin mixed layer and sustaining the high Chl-a concentrations. Estimates of iron flux based on in situ measurements of dissolved iron concentrations suggest that diapycnal mixing alone can supply iron to the base of the mixed layer at a rate of 64 +/- 2 nmol m(-2) day(-1) during the summer. In addition, the summer mixed layer in the Ona Basin deepens from January to April, allowing for iron-rich water to be steadily entrained from below. Estimates based on monthly mixed-layer climatologies produce average daily entrainment rates ranging from 5 to 25 nmol m(-2) day(-1). While neither diapycnal mixing nor entrainment alone is always sufficient to meet the estimated iron demand for the Ona Basin bloom, numerical simulation suggests that the combined effect of the two processes can consistently supply sufficient iron to sustain the bloom. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.