Publications

Export 5 results:
Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year  (Desc)]
1998
Holland, LZ, Holland ND.  1998.  Developmental gene expression in amphioxus: New insights into the evolutionary origin of vertebrate brain regions, neural crest, and rostrocaudal segmentation. American Zoologist. 38:647-658. AbstractWebsite

Amphioxus is widely held to be the closest invertebrate relative of the vertebrates and the best available stand-in for the proximate ancestor of the vertebrates. The spatiotemporal expression patterns of developmental genes can help suggest body part homologies between vertebrates and amphioxus, This approach is illustrated using five homeobox genes (AmphiHox1, AmphiHox2, AmphiOtx, AmphiDll, and AmphiEn) to pro,ide insights into the evolutionary origins of three important vertebrate features: the major brain regions, the neural crest, and rostrocaudal segmentation. During amphioxus development, the neural expression patterns of these genes are consistent with the presence of a forebrain (detailed neuroanatomy indicates that the forebrain is all diencephalon without any telencephalon) and an extensive hindbrain; the possible presence of a midbrain requires additional study. Further, during neurulation, the expression pattern of AmphiDll as web as migratory cell behavior suggest that the epidermal cells bordering the neural plate may represent a phylogenetic precursor of the vertebrate neural crest. Finally, when the paraxial mesoderm begins to segment, the earliest expression of AmphiEn is detected in the posterior part of each nascent and newly formed somite, This pattern recalls the expression of the segment-polarity gene engrailed during establishment of the segments of metameric protostomes. Thus, during animal evolution, the role of engrailed in establishing and maintaining metameric body plans may have arisen in a common segmented ancestor of both the protostomes and deuterostomes.

Glardon, S, Holland LZ, Gehring WJ, Holland ND.  1998.  Isolation and developmental expression of the amphioxus Pax-6 gene (AmphiPax-6): insights into eye and photoreceptor evolution. Development. 125:2701-2710. AbstractWebsite

Pax-6 genes have been identified from a broad range of invertebrate and vertebrate animals and shown to be always involved in early eye development. Therefore, it has been proposed that the various types of eyes evolved from a single eye prototype, by a Pax-6-dependent mechanism. Here we describe the characterization of a cephalochordate Pax-6 gene. The single amphioxus Pax-6 gene (AmphiPax-6) can produce several alternatively spliced transcripts, resulting in proteins with markedly different amino and carboxy termini, The amphioxus Pax-6 proteins are 92% identical to mammalian Pax-6 proteins in the paired domain and 100% identical in the homeodomain. Expression of AmphiPax-6 in the anterior epidermis of embryos may be related to development of an olfactory epithelium. Expression is also detectable in Hatschek's left diverticulum as it forms the preoral ciliated pit, part of which gives rise to the homolog of the vertebrate anterior pituitary, A zone of expression in the anterior neural plate of early embryos is carried into the cerebral vesicle (a probable diencephalic homolog) during neurulation, This zone includes cells that will differentiate into the lamellar body, a presumed homolog of the vertebrate pineal eye, In neurulae, AmphiPax-6 is also expressed in ventral cells at the anterior tip of the nerve cord; these cells are precursors of the photoreceptive neurons of the frontal eye, the presumed homolog of the vertebrate paired eyes. However, AmphiPax-6 expression was not detected in two additional types of photoreceptors, the Joseph cells or the organs of Hesse, which are evidently relatively recent adaptations (ganglionic photoreceptors) and appear to be rare exceptions to the general rule that animal photoreceptors develop from a genetic program triggered by Pax-6.

1994
Holland, PWH, Garcia-Fernandez J, Holland LZ, Williams NA, Holland ND.  1994.  The Molecular Control of Spatial Patterning in Amphioxus. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. 74:49-60. AbstractWebsite

The embryology of amphioxus (Chordata: Cephalochordata) has features in common with vertebrate embryology, reflecting a dose phylogenetic relationship between the two taxa. Amphioxus differs from vertebrates, however, in having less complex organogenesis and cranial morphogenesis, and less specialization along the anteroposterior body axis. Here we illustrate this by describing the embryology of an amphioxus species, Branchiostoma floridae. To gain further insight into the origins, evolutionary divergence and comparative embryology of these taxa, we are comparing the molecular control of embryonic development in amphioxus and vertebrates. For these analyses, we are focusing on homeobox genes: a diverse multigene family implicated in developmental control in many Metazoa. We report the results of PCR-based experiments which reveal that the amphioxus genome has homeobox genes from several recognized gene classes. The PCR experiments also suggest that amphioxus has fewer 'Hox' and 'Msx' class homeobox genes than do vertebrates. We suggest, therefore, that amphioxus may be a living descendant from an intermediate stage in the evolution of homeobox gene family complexity, and the complexity of vertebrate developmental control. The pattern of gene expression during embryogenesis has been described for one amphioxus homeobox gene of the Hox class. This gene is primarily expressed in the presumptive neural tube of amphioxus neurulae, later embryos and larvae, in a spatially-restricted manner. The expression data lead us to suggest that Hox genes are involved in the control of spatial patterning in the neural tube of amphioxus; the data are also interpreted as giving insight into possible homology between the amphioxus and vertebrate body plans.

1993
1992
Holland, PWH, Holland LZ, Williams NA, Holland ND.  1992.  An Amphioxus Homeobox Gene - Sequence Conservation, Spatial Expression During Development and Insights into Vertebrate Evolution. Development. 116:653-&. AbstractWebsite

The embryology of amphioxus has much in common with vertebrate embryology, reflecting a close phylogenetic relationship between the two groups. Amphioxus embryology is simpler in several key respects, however, including a lack of pronounced craniofacial morphogenesis. To gain an insight into the molecular changes that accompanied the evolution of vertebrate embryology, and into the relationship between the amphioxus and vertebrate body plans, we have undertaken the first molecular level investigation of amphioxus embryonic development. We report the cloning, complete DNA sequence determination, sequence analysis and expression analysis of an amphioxus homeobox gene, AmphiHox3, evolutionarily homologous to the third-most 3' paralogous group of mammalian Hox genes. Sequence comparison to a mammalian homologue, mouse Hox-2.7 (HoxB3), reveals several stretches of amino acid conservation within the deduced protein sequences. Whole mount in situ hybridization reveals localized expression of AmphiHox3 in the posterior mesoderm (but not in the somites), and region-specific expression in the dorsal nerve cord, of amphioxus neurulae, later embryos and larvae. The anterior limit to expression in the nerve cord is at the level of the four/five somite boundary at the neurula stage, and stabilises to just anterior to the first nerve cord pigment spot to form. Comparison to the anterior expression boundary of mouse Hox-2.7 (HoxB3) and related genes suggests that the vertebrate brain is homologous to an extensive region of the amphioxus nerve cord that contains the cerebral vesicle (a region at the extreme rostral tip) and extends posterior to somite four. This proposed homology implies that the vertebrate brain probably did not evolve solely from the cerebral vesicle of an amphioxus-like ancestor, nor did it arise entirely de novo anterior to the cerebral vesicle.