Non-neural ectoderm is really neural: Evolution of developmental patterning mechanisms in the non-neural ectoderm of chordates and the problem of sensory cell homologies

Citation:
Holland, LZ.  2005.  Non-neural ectoderm is really neural: Evolution of developmental patterning mechanisms in the non-neural ectoderm of chordates and the problem of sensory cell homologies. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B-Molecular and Developmental Evolution. 304B:304-323.

Date Published:

Jul

Keywords:

amphioxus larvae, ascidian ciona-intestinalis, branchiostoma-floridae, central-nervous-system, embryonic expression, halocynthia-roretzi, lateral-line, paired box gene, retinoic acid, transcription factors

Abstract:

In chordates, the ectoderm is divided into the neuroectoderm and the so-called non-neural ectoderm. In spite of its name, however, the non-neural ectoderm contains. numerous sensory cells. Therefore, the term "non-neural" ectoderm should be replaced by "general ectoderm." At least in amphioxus and tunicates and possibly in vertebrates as well, both the neuroectoderm and the general ectoderm are patterned anterior/posteriorly by mechanisms involving retinoic acid and Hox genes. In amphioxus and tunicates the ectodermal sensory cells, which have a wide range of ciliary and microvillar configurations, are mostly primary neurons sending axons to the CNS, although a minority lack axons. In contrast, vertebrate mechanosensory cells, called hair cells, are all secondary neurons that lack axons and have a characteristic eccentric cilium adjacent to a group of microvilli of graded lengths. It has been highly controversial whether the ectodermal sensory cells in the oral siphons of adult tunicates are homologous to vertebrate hair cells. In some species of tunicates, these cells appear to be secondary neurons, and microvillar and ciliary configurations of some of these cells approach those of vertebrate hair cells. However, none of the tunicate cells has all the characteristics of a hair cell, and there is a high degree of variation among ectodermal sensory cells within and between different species. Thus, similarities between the ectodermal sensory cells of any one species of tunicate and craniate hair cells may well represent convergent evolution rather than homology.

Notes:

n/a

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DOI:

10.1002/jez.21038