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2016
Cai, SH, Tauxe L, Deng CL, Qin HF, Pan YX, Jin GY, Chen XX, Chen W, Xie F, Zhu RX.  2016.  New archaeomagnetic direction results from China and their constraints on palaeosecular variation of the geomagnetic field in Eastern Asia. Geophysical Journal International. 207:1332-1342.   10.1093/gji/ggw351   AbstractWebsite

We carried out an archaeomagnetic directional study on 38 oriented samples (bricks and baked clays) collected from four archaeological locations at three provinces in China. The ages of our samples, spanning from similar to 3000 BCE to similar to 1300 CE, were constrained using a combination of archaeological context, radiocarbon dating and stratigraphic information. Rock magnetic results demonstrate that the main magnetic minerals of the studied samples are magnetite and/or hematite in single domain and superparamagnetic states. A total of 20 new reliable archaeodirectional data from 12 independent sites are obtained after thermal demagnetization experiments. These are the first set of archaeodirectional data in China produced since the 1990s. The published data are largely from the past 2 kyr and data from older time periods are rare. Our new data, especially those from period older than 3 ka, fill many gaps of the presently published dataset and will provide strong constraints on palaeosecular variation of the geomagnetic field in Eastern Asia and on the improvement of global models. Quite a few inflection points in the direction of the geomagnetic field are recorded in Eastern Asia over the past 10 kyr and some of them synchronize with the maximums or minimums of the palaeointensity. The palaeosecular variation rates are very low (based on present data distribution) before 2000 BCE and then start to increase and fluctuate afterward, which is generally consistent with the pattern of palaeointensity variations in this area.

Dallanave, E, Bachtadse V, Crouch EM, Tauxe L, Shepherd CL, Morgans HEG, Hollis CJ, Hines BR, Sugisaki S.  2016.  Constraining early to middle Eocene climate evolution of the southwest Pacific and Southern Ocean. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 433:380-392.   10.1016/j.epsl.2015.11.010   AbstractWebsite

Studies of early Paleogene climate suffer from the scarcity of well-dated sedimentary records from the southern Pacific Ocean, the largest ocean basin during this time. We present a new magnetostratigraphic record from marine sediments that outcrop along the mid-Waipara River, South Island, New Zealand. Fully oriented samples for paleomagnetic analyses were collected along 45 m of stratigraphic section, which encompasses magnetic polarity Chrons from C23n to C21n (similar to 51.5-47 Ma). These results are integrated with foraminiferal, calcareous nannofossil, and dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) biostratigraphy from samples collected in three different expeditions along a total of similar to 80 m of section. Biostratigraphic data indicates relatively continuous sedimentation from the lower Waipawan to the upper Heretaungan New Zealand stages (i.e., lower Ypresian to lower Lutetian, 55.5 to 46 Ma). We provide the first magnetostratigraphically-calibrated age of 48.88 Ma for the base of the Heretaungan New Zealand stage (latest early Eocene). To improve the correlation of the climate record in this section with other Southern Ocean records, we reviewed the magnetostratigraphy of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 (East Tasman Plateau) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site 131356 (Wilkes Land Margin, Antarctica). A paleomagnetic study of discrete samples could not confirm any reliable magnetic polarity reversals in the early Eocene at Site 1172. We use the robust magneto-biochronology of a succession of dinocyst bioevents that are common to mid-Waipara, Site 1172, and Site U1356 to assist correlation between the three records. A new integrated chronology offers new insights into the nature and completeness of the southern high-latitude climate histories derived from these sites. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2012
Tauxe, L, Stickley CE, Sugisaki S, Bijl PK, Bohaty SM, Brinkhuis H, Escutia C, Flores JA, Houben AJP, Iwai M, Jimenez-Espejo F, McKay R, Passchier S, Pross J, Riesselman CR, Rohl U, Sangiorgi F, Welsh K, Klaus A, Fehr A, Bendle JAP, Dunbar R, Gonzalez J, Hayden T, Katsuki K, Olney MP, Pekar SF, Shrivastava PK, van de Flierdt T, Williams T, Yamane M.  2012.  Chronostratigraphic framework for the IODP Expedition 318 cores from the Wilkes Land Margin: Constraints for paleoceanographic reconstruction. Paleoceanography. 27   10.1029/2012pa002308   AbstractWebsite

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 318 to the Wilkes Land margin of Antarctica recovered a sedimentary succession ranging in age from lower Eocene to the Holocene. Excellent stratigraphic control is key to understanding the timing of paleoceanographic events through critical climate intervals. Drill sites recovered the lower and middle Eocene, nearly the entire Oligocene, the Miocene from about 17 Ma, the entire Pliocene and much of the Pleistocene. The paleomagnetic properties are generally suitable for magnetostratigraphic interpretation, with well-behaved demagnetization diagrams, uniform distribution of declinations, and a clear separation into two inclination modes. Although the sequences were discontinuously recovered with many gaps due to coring, and there are hiatuses from sedimentary and tectonic processes, the magnetostratigraphic patterns are in general readily interpretable. Our interpretations are integrated with the diatom, radiolarian, calcareous nannofossils and dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) biostratigraphy. The magnetostratigraphy significantly improves the resolution of the chronostratigraphy, particularly in intervals with poor biostratigraphic control. However, Southern Ocean records with reliable magnetostratigraphies are notably scarce, and the data reported here provide an opportunity for improved calibration of the biostratigraphic records. In particular, we provide a rare magnetostratigraphic calibration for dinocyst biostratigraphy in the Paleogene and a substantially improved diatom calibration for the Pliocene. This paper presents the stratigraphic framework for future paleoceanographic proxy records which are being developed for the Wilkes Land margin cores. It further provides tight constraints on the duration of regional hiatuses inferred from seismic surveys of the region.

2006
Krijgsman, W, Tauxe L.  2006.  E/I corrected paleolatitudes for the sedimentary rocks of the Baja British Columbia hypothesis. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 242:205-216.   10.1016/j.epsl.2005.11.052   AbstractWebsite

Paleomagnetic inclinations from sediments of the western terranes of Canada are consistently too shallow for their reconstructed paleogeographic positions. Two contradicting explanations for these discrepancies are: (1) terranes have been displaced northward with respect to the stable American craton by several thousands of kilometres between the Late Cretaceous (similar to 75 Ma) and the Eocene (similar to 50 Ma) and (2) sedimentary inclination error has caused a shallow bias in the paleomagnetic directions. Here, we apply the elongation/inclination (E/I) method to paleomagnetie data sets from sedimentary rocks of supposedly allochtonous terranes of Nvestem North America to correct for inclination flattening. Our results indicate that the paleomagnetic directions from the continental Silverquick sediments (95-92 Ma) of southern British Colombia are not seriously affected by inclination error, because the magnetic signal most likely concerns a chemical remanent magnetisation (CRM). In contrast, the marine sediments of the Nanaimo Group (84-72 Ma) of Vancouver Island region appear seriously affected by inclination flattening (f=0.7) and the EA corrected mean inclinations are about 9 degrees steeper than the original data. We arrive at corrected inclinations/paleolatitudes of I** = 57 degrees/lambda = 38 degrees N for the Silverquick and I** = 55 degrees/lambda = 36 degrees N for the Nanaimo sediments. Our corrected paleolatitudes indicate that the Canadian terranes were indeed located adjacent to the Baja Californian margin during the Late Cretaceous, thus supporting the Baja BC hypothesis. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2003
Bowles, J, Tauxe L, Gee J, McMillan D, Cande S.  2003.  Source of tiny wiggles in Chron C5: A comparison of sedimentary relative intensity and marine magnetic anomalies. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 4   10.1029/2002gc000489   AbstractWebsite

[1] In addition to the well-established pattern of polarity reversals, short-wavelength fluctuations are often present in both sea-surface data ("tiny wiggles'') and near-bottom anomaly data. While a high degree of correlation between different geographical regions suggests a geomagnetic origin for some of these wiggles, anomaly data alone cannot uniquely determine whether they represent short reversals or paleointensity variations. Independent evidence from another geomagnetic recording medium such as deep-sea sediments is required to determine the true nature of the tiny wiggles. We present such independent evidence in the form of sedimentary relative paleointensity from Chron C5. We make the first comparison between a sedimentary relative paleointensity record (ODP Site 887 at 54degreesN, 148degreesW) and deep-tow marine magnetic anomaly data (43degreesN, 131degreesW) [ Bowers et al., 2001] for Chron C5. The sediment cores are densely sampled at similar to2.5 kyr resolution. The inclination record shows no evidence for reverse intervals within the similar to1 myr-long normal Chron C5n.2n. Rock magnetic measurements suggest that the primary magnetic carrier is pseudo-single domain magnetite. We choose a partial anhysteretic magnetization (pARM) as our preferred normalizer, and the resulting relative paleointensity record is used as input to a forward model of crustal magnetization. We then compare the results of this model with the stacked deep-tow anomaly records. The two records show a significant degree of correlation, suggesting that the tiny wiggles in the marine magnetic anomalies are likely produced by paleointensity variations. An analysis of our sampling density suggests that if any reverse intervals exist at this site, they are likely to be <5 kyr in duration. Furthermore, we suggest that reverse intervals during Chron C5n.2n documented in other locations are unlikely to be global.

2001
Cronin, M, Tauxe L, Constable C, Selkin P, Pick T.  2001.  Noise in the quiet zone. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 190:13-30.   10.1016/s0012-821x(01)00354-5   AbstractWebsite

We have carried out a detailed paleomagnetic investigation of two stratigraphically overlapping sections from the Scaglia Bianca Formation (similar to 85-89.5 Ma) in the Umbria-Marche area in central Italy. Sampling was conducted over 32 in and 7 in intervals at La Roccaccia and Furlo respectively. After AF cleaning the majority of specimens show the expected normal magnetic field orientation, however a number of specimens are directionally anomalous. Some of these deviant specimens are accompanied by apparent spikes or dips in normalized intensity. A detailed investigation of rock magnetics shows that most of these deviations are not a sign of excursionary geomagnetic field behavior, but rather correspond to specimens with distinct rock magnetic characteristics and are therefore rock magnetic 'noise'. Such specimens should not be interpreted as records of the geomagnetic field. Our experience suggests that detailed rock magnetic and magnetic fabric analysis should be done on all anomalous directions prior to interpreting them as geomagnetic field behavior. After elimination of rock magnetic noise in the Scaglia Bianca data sets, there is a high degree of agreement in direction and to a lesser extent relative intensity between correlative portions of the two sections. We therefore offer this data set as a robust record of geomagnetic field behavior during the 4.5 Myr interval represented by the La Roccaccia section. A statistical analysis of the relative intensity observations suggests that this period of the Cretaceous Normal Superchron is characterized by a normalized variability in paleointensity (standard deviation about 28% of the mean value) that is significantly lower than seen during the Oligocene over intervals in which reversals or tiny wiggles occur (typically about 50%). The directional stability results in virtual geomagnetic pole dispersion compatible with that found in volcanic rocks from around the same latitude and ranging in age from 80 to 110 Ma. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

2000
Katari, K, Tauxe L.  2000.  Effects of pH and salinity on the intensity of magnetization in redeposited sediments. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 181:489-496.   10.1016/s0012-821x(00)00226-0   AbstractWebsite

The intensity of magnetization in redeposited sediments was measured as a function of salinity and pH of the sediment-water mixture. The intensity was relatively low at high salinity or low pH. Under these conditions, interparticle bonds are enhanced, which lead to the formation of larger flocs. Ferromagnetic minerals (magnetite in our sediment) are incorporated in the flocs consisting mainly of non-magnetic minerals, and orientation along an applied field is resisted by the drag proportional to the third power of the diameter of the floc. Higher intensity is recorded at lower salinity and higher pH, when inter-particle forces are weaker, and flee sizes are smaller. The increase of magnetization as a function of pH stops at a pH of about 5, which is the PZC of the edge of illite (the dominant nonmagnetic mineral in our sediment). Above this pH, both the edge and face of the illite grains are negative, and there is net repulsion, which retards flocculation. The interactions between clay particles therefore have a larger effect on the intensity of magnetization than interactions between magnetite and clay. This suggests that magnetite is always included in a clay-magnetite domain, and this domain is the smallest unit that is reoriented by a magnetic field. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

1996
Constable, C, Tauxe L.  1996.  Towards absolute calibration of sedimentary paleointensity records. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 143:269-274.   10.1016/0012-821x(96)00128-8   AbstractWebsite

Using relative paleointensity estimates derived from twelve globally distributed pelagic sediment cores, we assess whether they record a signal consistent with that expected from a dominant geocentric axial dipole, The cores span the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary and we normalize the observations by supposing that at the time the direction reverses the intensity low reflects only the non-axial-dipole contribution to the field. We further assume that this non-axial-dipole contribution to the field is invariant with geographic location. From absolute paleointensity compilations we estimate its size to be about 7.5 mu T; this supplies the calibration for the axial dipole signal away from the extreme low in intensity, The data predict the dipole field variation with latitude with similar accuracy to that observed in absolute paleointensity records, and show similar behavior when transformed to virtual axial dipole moments.

Tauxe, L, Herbert T, Shackleton NJ, Kok YS.  1996.  Astronomical calibration of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary: Consequences for magnetic remanence acquisition in marine carbonates and the Asian loess sequences. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 140:133-146.   10.1016/0012-821x(96)00030-1   AbstractWebsite

We have compiled 19 records from marine carbonate cores in which the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary (MBB) has been reasonably well constrained within the astronomically forced stratigraphic framework using oxygen isotopes. By correlation of the delta(18)O data to a timescale based on astronomical forcing, we estimate astronomical ages for each of the MBB horizons. In all but one record the MBB occurs within Stage 19. Most magnetostratigraphic sections in Asian Loess place the MBB within a loess interval. Since loess deposition is presumed to be associated with glacial intervals, loess horizons should correspond to even-numbered oxygen isotope stages. A glacial age for the MBB is at odds with the results presented here, which firmly place the MBB within interglacial Stage 19. Inconsistency among the many loess sections and between the loess and the marine records suggests that the magnetic interpretation of loess sections may be more complicated than hitherto supposed. The mean of the Stage 19 age estimates for the MBB is 777.9 +/- 1.8 (N = 18). Inclusion of the single Stage 20 age results in a mean of 778.8 +/- 2.5 (N = 19). The astronomical age estimate of the MBB compares favorably with an (unweighted) mean of 778.2 +/- 3.5 (N = 10) from a compilation of Ar-40/Ar-39 results of transitional lava flows. Combining the two independent data sets yields a grand mean of 778.0 +/- 1.7 (N = 28). The new compilation shows virtually no trend in placement of the MBB within isotope Stage 19 as a function of sediment accumulation rate. We interpret this to mean that the average depth of remanence acquisition is within a few centimeters of the sediment-water interface. Separating the cores into two geographic regions (an Indo-Pacific-Caribbean [IPC] Group and an Atlantic Group) results in a significant difference in the position of the mid-point of the reversal with respect to the astronomical time scale. The data presented here suggest a difference of several thousand years between the two regions. This observation could be caused by systematic differences between the two regions in sedimentation rate within the interval of interest, systematic differences in remanence acquisition, or by genuine differences in the timing of the directional changes between the two regions.

1994
Tauxe, L, Gee J, Gallet Y, Pick T, Bown T.  1994.  Magnetostratigraphy of the Willwood Formation, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming - New Constraints on the Location of Paleocene Eocene Boundary. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 125:159-172.   10.1016/0012-821x(94)90213-5   AbstractWebsite

The lower Eocene Willwood Formation in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming preserves a rich and diverse mammalian and floral record. The paleomagnetic behavior of the sequence of floodplain paleosols of varying degrees of maturation ranges from excellent to poor. We present a magnetostratigraphic section for a composite section near Worland, Wyoming, by using a set of strict criteria for interpreting the step-wise alternating field and thermal demagnetization data of 266 samples from 90 sites throughout the composite section. Correlation to the geomagnetic reversal time scale was achieved by combining magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from this section, from a section in the Clark's Fork Basin in northern Wyoming, and from DSDP Site 550, with the isotopic date determined on a tuff near the top of our section. Our correlation suggests that the Bighorn Basin composite section in the Worland area spans from within Chron C24r to near the top of Chron C24n, or from approximately 55 to 52 Ma. This correlation places the Paleocene/Eocene boundary within the vicinity of the base of the section. Cryptochron C24r.6 of Cande and Kent is tentatively identified some 100 m above the base of the section. The temporal framework provided here enables correlation of the mammalian biostratigraphy of the Bighorn Basin to other continental sequences as well as to marine records. It also provides independent chronological information for the calculation of sediment accumulation rates to constrain soil maturation rates. We exclude an age as young as 53 Ma for the Paleocene/Eocene boundary and support older ages, as recommended in recent time scales. The location of a tuff dated at 52.8 +/- 0.3 Ma at the older boundary C24n.1 is consistent with the, age of 52.5 Ma estimated by Cande and Kent and inconsistent with that of 53.7 Ma, from Harland et al.

1993
Hartl, P, Tauxe L, Constable C.  1993.  Early Oligocene Geomatnetic-Field Behavior From Deep-Sea Drilling Project Site-522. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 98:19649-19665.   10.1029/93jb02019   AbstractWebsite

Hydraulic piston coring operations at Deep Sea Drillng Project site 522 in the South Atlantic retrieved an unusually continuous section of late Eocene to late Oligocene pelagic sediments, which we sampled at 3-4 cm intervals (approximately 3-5 kyr). Natural remanent magnetization demagnetization studies indicate a well-behaved remanence. Various rock magnetic procedures strongly suggest the magnetic carrier is dominated by pseudo-single domain magnetite appropriate for recording relative intensity variations of the paleomagnetic field. Nine zones of unusually low relative paleointensity were identified within the 2 my Chron C12R interval. Seven can be typified by a approximately 20-40 kyr interval of low field intensity accompanied by apparently random, low-amplitude, short-duration directional fluctuations. The other two are of approximately equal duration and intensity but exhibit an orderly progression of directional changes that result in well-defined virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) paths confined along a preferred meridian of approximately 70-90-degrees-W longitude. We propose that both styles occur when the main dipole term diminishes significantly but that the former result when undimished ''normal'' secular variation is continuous during the period of low axial dipole moment. We propose that the other two lows in relative paleointensity, along with one reversal record, reflect a field structure of low axial dipole moment dominated by a low-degree nonzonal spherical harmonic term. Alternatively, the confined VGP paths could be an artifact of heavy remanence smoothing between nonantipodal, semistable transitional geomagnetic pole positions. Geographical control of VGP paths, particularly along approximately 70-90-degrees-W longitude, has recently been noted for much younger reversals. The site 522 record may indicate that the underlying cause of this phenomenon was present at 32 Ma. We compare our C12R record of paleointensity lows with C12R marine magnetic anomaly ''tiny wiggles''. These data appear to indicate that C12R tiny wiggles resulted from periods of low geomagnetic field intensity that were sometimes accompanied by directional excursions.

1991
Tauxe, L, Kylstra N, Constable C.  1991.  Bootstrap Statistics for Paleomagnetic Data. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth and Planets. 96:11723-11740.   10.1029/91jb00572   AbstractWebsite

The power and utility of paleomagnetic analyses stem largely from the ability to quantify such parameters as the degree of rotation of a rock body, or the orientation of an anisotropy axis. Until recently, estimates for uncertainty in these paleomagnetically determined parameters derived from assumptions concerning the underlying parametric distribution functions of the data. In many geologically important situations, the commonly used parametric distribution functions fail to model the data adequately and the uncertainty estimates so obtained are unreliable. Such essentials as the test for common mean require data sets consistent with a spherically symmetric underlying distribution; their application in inappropriate circumstances can result in flawed interpretations. Moreover, the almost universally used approximation for a cone of 95% confidence for the mean of a sample drawn from a Fisher distribution is quite biased even for moderate dispersions (kappa = 25). The availability of inexpensive, powerful computers makes possible the empirical estimation of confidence regions by means of data resampling techniques such as the bootstrap. These resampling schemes replace analytical solutions with repeated simple calculations. We describe a bootstrap approach for the calculation of uncertainties for means or principal directions of paleomagnetic data. The method is tested on means of simulated Fisher distributions with known parameters and is found to be reliable for data sets with more than about 25 elements. Because a Fisher distribution is not assumed, the approach is applicable to a wide range of paleomagnetic data and can be used equally well on directions or associated virtual poles. We also illustrate bootstrap techniques for the discrimination of directions and for the fold test which enable the use of these powerful tests on the wider range of data sets commonly obtained in paleomagnetic investigations.

1986
Ruddiman, W, Sarnthein M, Baldauf J, Backman J, Bloemendal J, Curry W, Farrimond P, Faugeres J C, Janecek T, Katsura Y, Manivit H, Mazzullo J, Mienert J, Pokras EM, Raymo M, Schultheiss P, Stein R, Tauxe L, Valet JP, Weaver PP, Yasuda H.  1986.  Ocean Drilling Program; palaeoclimatic linkage between high and low latitudes. Nature (London). 322:211-212., London, United Kingdom (GBR): Macmillan Journals, London AbstractWebsite
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