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Joyce, TM, Warren BA, Talley LD.  1986.  The Geothermal Heating of the Abyssal Sub-Arctic Pacific-Ocean. Deep-Sea Research Part a-Oceanographic Research Papers. 33:1003-1015.   10.1016/0198-0149(86)90026-9   AbstractWebsite

Recent deep CTD-O2 measurements in the abyssal North Pacific along 175°W, 152°W, and 47°N indicate large-scale changes in the O-S characteristics in the deepest kilometer of the water column. Geothermal heat flux from the abyssal sediments can be invoked as the agent for causing large-scale modification of abyssal temperatures (but not salinities) in the subarctic Pacific Ocean. East-west and north-south thermal age differences of about 100 years are inferred using a spatially uniform geothermal heat flux of 5 x 10-2 WrmW m-2.

Waterhouse, AF, MacKinnon JA, Nash JD, Alford MH, Kunze E, Simmons HL, Polzin KL, St Laurent LC, Sun OM, Pinkel R, Talley LD, Whalen CB, Huussen TN, Carter GS, Fer I, Waterman S, Garabato ACN, Sanford TB, Lee CM.  2014.  Global patterns of diapycnal mixing from measurements of the turbulent dissipation rate. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 44:1854-1872.   10.1175/jpo-d-13-0104.1   AbstractWebsite

The authors present inferences of diapycnal diffusivity from a compilation of over 5200 microstructure profiles. As microstructure observations are sparse, these are supplemented with indirect measurements of mixing obtained from(i) Thorpe-scale overturns from moored profilers, a finescale parameterization applied to (ii) shipboard observations of upper-ocean shear, (iii) strain as measured by profiling floats, and (iv) shear and strain from full-depth lowered acoustic Doppler current profilers (LADCP) and CTD profiles. Vertical profiles of the turbulent dissipation rate are bottom enhanced over rough topography and abrupt, isolated ridges. The geography of depth-integrated dissipation rate shows spatial variability related to internal wave generation, suggesting one direct energy pathway to turbulence. The global-averaged diapycnal diffusivity below 1000-m depth is O(10(-4))m(2) s(-1) and above 1000-m depth is O(10(-5))m(2) s(-1). The compiled microstructure observations sample a wide range of internal wave power inputs and topographic roughness, providing a dataset with which to estimate a representative global-averaged dissipation rate and diffusivity. However, there is strong regional variability in the ratio between local internal wave generation and local dissipation. In some regions, the depth-integrated dissipation rate is comparable to the estimated power input into the local internal wave field. In a few cases, more internal wave power is dissipated than locally generated, suggesting remote internal wave sources. However, at most locations the total power lost through turbulent dissipation is less than the input into the local internal wave field. This suggests dissipation elsewhere, such as continental margins.

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Zhang, HM, Talley LD.  1998.  Heat and buoyancy budgets and mixing rates in the upper thermocline of the Indian and global oceans. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 28:1961-1978.   10.1175/1520-0485(1998)028<1961:habbam>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Diapycnal and diathermal diffusivity values in the upper thermocline are estimated from buoyancy and heat budgets for water volumes bounded by isopycnals and isotherms, the air-sea interface, and coastline where applicable. Comprehensive analysis is given to the Indian Ocean, with an extended global general description. The Indian Ocean,gains buoyancy in the north (especially in the northeast) and loses buoyancy in the subtropical south. Freshest and least-dense water appears in the Bay of Bengal and isopycnals outcrop southwestward from there and then southward. Computation of diapycnal diffusivity (K-p) starts from the Bay of Bengal, expanding southwestward and southward and with depth. As isopycnals extend equatorward from the northeast and with increasing depth, K-p remains at about 1.3 cm(2) s(-1) for 20.2 sigma(theta) (Bay of Bengal) to 22.0 sigma(theta) (northeast Indian Ocean). Farther south (poleward) and at greater depth, K-p decreases from 0.9 cm(2) s(-1) for 23.0 sigma(theta) (north of 20 degrees S) to 0.5 cm(2) s(-1) for 25.0 sigma(theta) (north of 35 degrees S). Isotherms outcrop poleward from the equator. Diathermal diffusivity values computed from the heat budget are large at the equator and near the surface (4.0 cm(2) s(-1) for 28.5 degrees C isotherm) but decrease rapidly poleward and with depth (1.3 cm(2) s(-1) for 27.0 degrees C). This indicates stronger mixing either near the equator or the surface, or a possible component in the diathermal direction of the larger isopycnal diffusivity, as isotherms do not follow isopycnals in the upper Indian Ocean north of 10 degrees S. For the 21.0 degrees C isotherm? which closely follows isopycnal 25.0 sigma(theta), the heat budget yields a K-theta again of 0.5 cm(2) s(-1), the value of the diapycnal diffusivity. For the Indian-Pacific system, K-rho decreases from 1.3 cm(2) s(-1) for 22.0 sigma(theta) (the warm pool water, depth similar to 60 m) to 0.9 cm(2) s(-1) for 23.0 sigma(theta) (the tropical water between 20 degrees N and 20 degrees S, depth similar to 100 m), and to 0.1 cm(2) s(-1) for 25.0 sigma(theta) (40 degrees N-40 degrees S, depth similar to 170 m). In the eastern tropical Pacific, K-rho = 1.1 cm(2) s(-1) for 21.5 sigma(theta) (depth similar to 25 m) while K-rho = 0.6 cm(2) s(-1) for 22.0 sigma(theta) (depth similar to 35 m). In the Atlantic, K-rho = 0.6 cm(2) s(-1) for 24.0 sigma(theta) between 20 degrees N and 15 degrees S (depth similar to 80 m), and 0.2 cm(2) s(-1) for 25.0 sigma(theta) between 30 degrees N and 35 degrees S (depth similar to 120 m). For the water volume bounded by 25.5 sigma(theta) farther south and north (50 degrees N-40 degrees S), air-sea buoyancy gain in the Tropics is about the size of the buoyancy loss in the subtropics, and the near-zero net flux may not have significance compared to the errors in the data. For 27.5 sigma(theta), which encompasses the large region from about 65 degrees N to the Antarctic (with midocean average depth of 400 m), K-rho is 0.2 cm(2) s(-1). The results indicate that mixing strength generally decreases poleward and with depth in the upper ocean.

Bourassa, MA, Gille ST, Bitz C, Carlson D, Cerovecki I, Clayson CA, Cronin MF, Drennan WM, Fairall CW, Hoffman RN, Magnusdottir G, Pinker RT, Renfrew IA, Serreze M, Speer K, Talley LD, Wick GA.  2013.  High-latitude ocean and sea ice surface fluxes: Challenges for climate research. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 94:403-423.   10.1175/bams-d-11-00244.1   AbstractWebsite

Polar regions have great sensitivity to climate forcing; however, understanding of the physical processes coupling the atmosphere and ocean in these regions is relatively poor. Improving our knowledge of high-latitute surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists, oceanographers, ice physicists, and climatologists, and between observationalists and modelers, as well as new combinations of in situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. This article describes the deficiencies in our current state of knowledge about air-sea surface fluxes in high latitutes, the sensitivity of various high-latitude processes to changes in surface fluxes, and the scientific requirements for surface fluxes at high latitutdes. We inventory the reasons, both logistical and physical, why existing flux products do not meet these requirements. Capturing an annual cycle in fluxes requires that instruments function through long periods of cold polar darkness, often far from support services, in situations subject to icing and extreme wave conditions. Furthermore, frequent cloud cover at high latitudes restricts the avilability of surface and atmospheric data from visible and infrared (IR) wavelength satellite sensors. Recommendations are made for improving high-latitude fluxes, including 1) acquiring more in situ observations, 2) developing improved satellite-flux-observing capabilities, 3) making observations and flux products more accessible, and 4) encouraging flux intercomparisons.

Talley, LD.  2007.  Hydrographic Atlas of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). Volume 2: Pacific Ocean. ( Sparrow M, Chapman P, Gould J, Eds.)., Southampton, UK: International WOCE Project Office Abstract

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Talley, LD.  2013.  Hydrographic Atlas of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). Volume 4: Indian Ocean. ( and M. Sparrow CPJ, Ed.)., Southampton, U.K.: International WOCE Project Office
Fiedler, PC, Talley LD.  2006.  Hydrography of the eastern tropical Pacific: A review. Progress in Oceanography. 69:143-180.   10.1016/j.pocean.2006.03.008   AbstractWebsite

Eastern tropical Pacific Ocean waters lie at the eastern end of a basin-wide equatorial current system, between two large subtropical gyres and at the terminus of two eastern boundary currents. Descriptions and interpretations of surface, pycnocline, intermediate and deep waters in the region are reviewed. Spatial and temporal patterns are discussed using (1) maps of surface temperature, salinity, and nutrients (phosphate, silicate, nitrate and nitrite), and thermocline and mixed layer parameters, and (2) meridional and zonal sections of temperature, salinity, potential density, oxygen, and nutrients. These patterns were derived from World Ocean Database observations by an ocean interpolation algorithm: loess-weighted observations were projected onto quadratic functions of spatial coordinates while simultaneously fitting annual and semiannual harmonics and the Southern Oscillation Index to account for interannual variability. Contrasts between the equatorial cold tongue and the eastern Pacific warm pool are evident in all the hydrographic parameters. Annual cycles and ENSO (El Nino-Southern Oscillation) variability are of similar amplitude in the eastern tropical Pacific, however, there are important regional differences in relative variability at these time scales. Unique characteristics of the eastern tropical Pacific are discussed: the strong and shallow pycnocline, the pronounced oxygen minimum layer, and the Costa Rica Dome. This paper is part of a comprehensive review of the oceanography of the eastern tropical Pacific. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Shcherbina, AY, Rudnick DL, Talley LD.  2005.  Ice-draft profiling from bottom-mounted ADCP data. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 22:1249-1266.   10.1175/jtech1776.1   AbstractWebsite

The feasibility of ice-draft profiling using an upward-looking bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is demonstrated. Ice draft is determined as the difference between the instrument depth, derived from high-accuracy pressure data, and the distance to the lower ice surface, determined by the ADCP echo travel time. Algorithms for the surface range estimate from the water-track echo intensity profiles, data quality control, and correction procedures have been developed. Sources of error in using an ADCP as an ice profiler were investigated using the models of sound signal propagation and reflection. The effects of atmospheric pressure changes, sound speed variation, finite instrument beamwidth, hardware signal processing, instrument tilt, beam misalignment, and vertical sensor offset are quantified. The developed algorithms are tested using the data from the winter-long ADCP deployment on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea.

Tishchenko, PY, Talley LD, Lobanov VB, Nedashkovskii AP, Pavlova GY, Sagalaev SG.  2007.  The influence of geochemical processes in the near-bottom layer on the hydrochemical characteristics of the waters of the Sea of Japan. Oceanology. 47:350-359.   10.1134/s0001437007030071   AbstractWebsite

According to the results of the international expedition aboard the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Professor Khromov in the summer 1999, areas with low oxygen contents (below 210 mu M/kg) and those with increased contents of dissolved inorganic carbon and phosphates were found that roughly coincided with one another. These areas are located near the bottom on the southwestern slope of the Tsushima Basin in the region of the Korea Strait and on the continental slope in the region of the Tatar Strait in the northern part of the sea at about 46 degrees N. The set of hydrochemical data points to a high geochemical activity in the near-bottom layer of the areas noted. This activity is confirmed by direct observations of the composition of the interstitial water in the sediments collected in the northern part of the sea during the expedition of R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrent'ev in 2003. It was supposed that the main cause of the increased geochemical activity is the runoff of suspended and dissolved matter from the Korea and Tatar straits. In the areas mentioned, the near-bottom waters are characterized by low values of the nitrogen-phosphorus ratio (below 10), which is geochemical proof of the denitrification process occurring under the conditions of high oxygen concentrations characteristic of the Sea of Japan. Based on the value of the annual production in the Sea of Japan, a rate of denitrification equal to 3.4 x 10(12) gN/year was calculated. Hence, it is confirmed that the geochemical processes in the near-bottom layer have a direct influence on the spatiotemporal characteristics of the hydrochemical properties of the waters of the Sea of Japan.

Flatau, M, Talley L, Musgrave D.  2000.  Interannual variability in the Gulf of Alaska during the 1991-94 El Nino. Journal of Climate. 13:1664-1673.   10.1175/1520-0442(2000)013<1664:ivitgo>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Mass and heat budgets in the Gulf of Alaska during the 1991-94 El Nino are examined using hydrographic data from several cruises undertaken as part of the International North Pacific Ocean Climate program and the repeated Canadian hydrographic sections out to Ocean weather Station Papa. The geostrophic ocean circulation resulted in convergence of heat into the region in spring 1992 and spring 1993. The advective heat convergence in spring 1992 corresponded to an average surface heat flux from the ocean to the atmosphere of about 74 W m(-2) in comparison with only 30 W m(-2) during spring 1993. The larger ocean heat loss to the atmosphere in 1992 followed a winter of large tropical SST anomalies and anomalously low pressure in the Aleutian low.

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Gordon, AL, Giulivi CF, Lee CM, Furey HH, Bower A, Talley L.  2002.  Japan/East Sea intrathermocline eddies. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 32:1960-1974.   10.1175/1520-0485(2002)032<1960:jesie>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Intrathermocline eddies (ITE) with diameters of 100 km and of thickness greater than 100 m are observed within each of the three quasi-stationary meanders of the Tsushima Current of the Japan/East Sea. Within the ITE homogenous, anticyclonic flowing core, the temperature is near 10degreesC with a salinity of 34.12 psu. Because of compensatory baroclinicity of the upper and lower boundaries of the ITE core, the ITE has minor sea level expression. The ITE core displays positive oxygen and negative salinity anomalies in comparison to the surrounding thermocline water, indicative of formation from winter mixed layer water along the southern side of the Japan/East Sea subpolar front. The winter mixing layer is then overridden, or slips below, the regional upper thermocline stratification with its characteristic salinity maximum layer. The winter mixed layer off the coast of Korea closely matches the ITE core characteristics, and is considered as a potential source region. Other sources may be present along the southern boundary of the subpolar front, including a frequently observed warm eddy over the western side of Yamato Rise.

Talley, LD, Min DH, Lobanov VB, Luchin VA, Ponomarev VI, Salyuk AN, Shcherbina AY, Tishchenko PY, Zhabin I.  2006.  Japan/East Sea water masses and their relation to the sea's circulation. Oceanography. 19:32-49.   10.5670/oceanog.2006.42   Abstract

The Japan/East Sea is a major anomaly in the ventilation and overturn picture of the Pacific Ocean. The North Pacific is well known to be nearly unventilated at intermediate and abyssal depths, reflected in low oxygen concentration at 1000 m (Figure 1). (High oxygen indicates newer water in more recent contact with the atmosphere. Oxygen declines as water "ages" after it leaves the sea surface mainly because of bacterial respiration.) Even the small production of North Pacific Intermediate Water in the Okhotsk Sea (Talley, 1991; Shcherbina et al., 2003) and the tiny amount of new bottom water encountered in the deep Bering Sea (Warner and Roden, 1995) have no obvious impact on the overall oxygen distribution at 1000 m and below, down to 3500 m, which is the approximate maximum depth of the Bering, Okhotsk, and Japan/East Seas.

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Park, GH, Lee K, Tishchenko P, Min DH, Warner MJ, Talley LD, Kang DJ, Kim KR.  2006.  Large accumulation of anthropogenic CO(2) in the East (Japan) Sea and its significant impact on carbonate chemistry. Global Biogeochemical Cycles. 20   10.1029/2005gb002676   AbstractWebsite

[ 1] This paper reports on a basin-wide inventory of anthropogenic CO(2) in the East ( Japan) Sea determined from high-quality alkalinity, chlorofluorocarbon, and nutrient data collected during a summertime survey in 1999 and total dissolved inorganic carbon data calculated from pH and alkalinity measurements. The data set comprises measurements from 203 hydrographic stations and covers most of the East Sea with the exception of the northwestern boundary region. Anthropogenic CO(2) concentrations are estimated by separating this value from total dissolved inorganic carbon using a tracer-based ( chlorofluorocarbon) separation technique. Wintertime surface CFC-12 data collected in regions of deep water formation off Vladivostok, Russia, improve the accuracy of estimates of anthropogenic CO(2) concentrations by providing improved air-sea CO(2) disequilibrium values for intermediate and deep waters. Our calculation yields a total anthropogenic CO(2) inventory in the East Sea of 0.40 +/- 0.06 petagrams of carbon as of 1999. Anthropogenic CO(2) has already reached the bottom of the East Sea, largely owing to the effective transport of anthropogenic CO(2) from the surface to the ocean interior via deep water formation in the waters off Vladivostok. The highest specific column inventory ( vertically integrated inventory per square meter) of anthropogenic CO(2) of 80 mol C m(-2) is found in the Japan Basin ( 40 degrees N - 44 degrees N). Comparison of this inventory with those for other major basins of the same latitude band reveal that the East Sea values are much higher than the inventory for the Pacific Ocean (20 - 30 mol C m(-2)) and are similar to the inventory for the North Atlantic (66 - 72 mol C m(-2)). The substantial accumulation of anthropogenic CO(2) in the East Sea during the industrial era has caused the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons to move upward by 80 - 220 m and 500 - 700 m, respectively. These upward movements are approximately 5 times greater than those found in the North Pacific. Both the large accumulation of anthropogenic CO(2) and its significant impact on carbonate chemistry in the East Sea suggest that this sea is an important site for monitoring the future impact of the oceanic invasion of anthropogenic CO(2).

Whalen, CB, MacKinnon JA, Talley LD.  2018.  Large-scale impacts of the mesoscale environment on mixing from wind-driven internal waves. Nature Geoscience. 11:842-+.   10.1038/s41561-018-0213-6   AbstractWebsite

Oceanic mesoscale structures such as eddies and fronts can alter the propagation, breaking and subsequent turbulent mixing of wind-generated internal waves. However, it has been difficult to ascertain whether these processes affect the global-scale patterns, timing and magnitude of turbulent mixing, thereby powering the global oceanic overturning circulation and driving the transport of heat and dissolved gases. Here we present global evidence demonstrating that mesoscale features can significantly enhance turbulent mixing due to wind-generated internal waves. Using internal wave-driven mixing estimates calculated from Argo profiling floats between 30 degrees and 45 degrees N, we find that both the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of turbulent mixing and the response to increases in the wind energy flux are larger to a depth of at least 2,000 m in the presence of a strong and temporally uniform field of mesoscale eddy kinetic energy. Mixing is especially strong within energetic anticyclonic mesoscale features compared to cyclonic features, indicating that local modification of wind-driven internal waves is probably one mechanism contributing to the elevated mixing observed in energetic mesoscale environments.

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Talley, LD.  1984.  Meridional Heat-Transport in the Pacific-Ocean. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 14:231-241.   10.1175/1520-0485(1984)014<0231:mhtitp>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The heat transported meridionally in the Pacific Ocean is calculated from the surface heat budgets of Clark and Weare and others; both budgets were based on Bunker's method with different radiation formulas. The meridional heat transport is also calculated from the surface heat budget of Esbensen and Kushnir, who used Budyko's method. The heat transport is southward at most latitudes if the numbers of Clark and of Weare are used. It is northward in the North Pacific and southward in the South Pacific if Eshensen and Kushnir's numbers are used. Systematic errors in both calculations appear to be so large that confident determination of even the sign of the heat transport in the North Pacific is not possible. The amount of heat transported poleward by all oceans is obtained from the Pacific Ocean calculation and transports in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans based on Bunker's surface heat fluxes.

Hernandez-Guerra, A, Talley LD.  2016.  Meridional overturning transports at 30 degrees S in the Indian and Pacific Oceans in 2002-2003 and 2009. Progress in Oceanography. 146:89-120.   10.1016/j.pocean.2016.06.005   AbstractWebsite

The meridional circulation and transports at 30 degrees S in the Pacific and Indian Oceans for the years 20022003 and 2009 are compared, using GO-SHIP hydrographic section data with an inverse box model and several choices of constraints. Southward heat transport across the combined Indian-Pacific sections, reflecting net heating north of these sections, doubled from -0.7 +/- 0.2 PW in 2002-2003 to -1.4 +/- 0.1 PW in 2009 (negative sign is southward), with the increase concentrated in the Indian Ocean (-0.6 PW compared with similar to 0.2 PW in the Pacific), and was insensitive to model choices for the Indonesian Throughflow. Diagnosed net evaporation also more than doubled in the Indian Ocean, from 0.21-0.27 Sv in 2002-2003 to 0.51-0.58 in 2009, with a smaller but significant increase in net evaporation in the Pacific, from 0.06-0.08 Sv to 0.16-0.32 Sv. These increased heat and freshwater exports coincided with Indian Ocean warming, a shift in the Indian's shallow gyre overturning transport to lower densities, and an increase in southward Agulhas Current transport from 75 Sv in 2002 to 92 Sv in 2009. The Indian's deep overturn weakened from about 11 Sv in 2002 to 7 Sv in 2009. In contrast, the Pacific Ocean overturning circulation was, nearly unchanged from 2003 to 2009, independent of model within the uncertainties. The East Australian Current transport decreased only slightly, from 52 Sv to 46 Sv. The southward Pacific Deep Water transport was at a higher density than the southward Indian Deep Water transport in both years and all models, similar to prior results. Estimated diapycnal diffusivity and velocity are strongly enhanced near the ocean bottom and are higher farther up in the water column in the Indian than in the Pacific, likely extending the reach of Indian Ocean overturning up to shallower depths than in the Pacific. The horizontal distribution of transports in the Pacific at all depths changed notably from 2003 to 2009, despite the stability of its meridional overturning structure. The 2009 horizontal structure resembles a "bowed gyre"; the hydrographic section data show that this disturbance extends to the abyss and disrupts the Deep Western Boundary Current structure in the Southwest Pacific Basin. Satellite altimetry suggests association with slow westward Rossby wave propagation generated in the eastern Pacific, with no apparent effect on the net overturning circulation. The Indian Ocean's upper ocean horizontal structure was stable between the two years even though its shallow gyre overturning transports changed significantly. On the other hand, northward abyssal transports concentrated' in the central Indian Ocean (Crozet Basin) in 2002 shifted westward to the Mozambique and Madagascar Basins in 2009, although the Crozet Basin's Deep Western Boundary Current existed in both years. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Russell, JL, Kamenkovich I, Bitz C, Ferrari R, Gille ST, Goodman PJ, Hallberg R, Johnson K, Khazmutdinova K, Marinov I, Mazloff M, Riser S, Sarmiento JL, Speer K, Talley LD, Wanninkhof R.  2018.  Metrics for the evaluation of the Southern Ocean in coupled climate models and earth system models. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 123:3120-3143.   10.1002/2017jc013461   AbstractWebsite

The Southern Ocean is central to the global climate and the global carbon cycle, and to the climate's response to increasing levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases, as it ventilates a large fraction of the global ocean volume. Global coupled climate models and earth system models, however, vary widely in their simulations of the Southern Ocean and its role in, and response to, the ongoing anthropogenic trend. Due to the region's complex water-mass structure and dynamics, Southern Ocean carbon and heat uptake depend on a combination of winds, eddies, mixing, buoyancy fluxes, and topography. Observationally based metrics are critical for discerning processes and mechanisms, and for validating and comparing climate and earth system models. New observations and understanding have allowed for progress in the creation of observationally based data/model metrics for the Southern Ocean. Metrics presented here provide a means to assess multiple simulations relative to the best available observations and observational products. Climate models that perform better according to these metrics also better simulate the uptake of heat and carbon by the Southern Ocean. This report is not strictly an intercomparison, but rather a distillation of key metrics that can reliably quantify the "accuracy" of a simulation against observed, or at least observable, quantities. One overall goal is to recommend standardization of observationally based benchmarks that the modeling community should aspire to meet in order to reduce uncertainties in climate projections, and especially uncertainties related to oceanic heat and carbon uptake. Plain Language Summary Observationally based metrics are essential for the standardized evaluation of climate and earth system models, and for reducing the uncertainty associated with future projections by those models.

Carter, BR, Talley LD, Dickson AG.  2014.  Mixing and remineralization in waters detrained from the surface into Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water in the southeastern Pacific. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 119:4001-4028.   10.1002/2013jc009355   AbstractWebsite

A hydrographic data set collected in the region and season of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water (SAMW and AAIW) formation in the southeastern Pacific allows us to estimate the preformed properties of surface water detrained into these water masses from deep mixed layers north of the Subantarctic Front and Antarctic Surface Water south of the front. Using 10 measured seawater properties, we estimate: the fractions of SAMW/AAIW that originate as surface source waters, as well as fractions that mix into these water masses from subtropical thermocline water above and Upper Circumpolar Deep Water below the subducted SAMW/AAIW; ages associated with the detrained surface water; and remineralization and dissolution rates and ratios. The mixing patterns imply that cabbeling can account for similar to 0.005-0.03 kg m(-3) of additional density in AAIW, and similar to 0-0.02 kg m(-3) in SAMW. We estimate a shallow depth (similar to 300-700 m, above the aragonite saturation horizon) calcium carbonate dissolution rate of 0.4 +/- 0.2 mmol CaCO3 kg(-1) yr(-1), a phosphate remineralization rate of 0.031 +/- 0.009 mu mol P kg(-1) yr(-1), and remineralization ratios of P:N:-O-2:C-org of 1:(15.5 +/- 0.6):(143 +/- 10):(104 +/- 22) for SAMW/AAIW. Our shallow depth calcium carbonate dissolution rate is comparable to previous estimates for our region. Our -O-2:P ratio is smaller than many global averages. Our model suggests neglecting diapycnal mixing of preformed phosphate has likely biased previous estimates of -O-2:P and C-org:P high, but that the C-org:P ratio bias may have been counteracted by a second bias in previous studies from neglecting anthropogenic carbon gradients.

Hanawa, K, Talley LD.  2001.  Mode Waters. Ocean circulation and climate : observing and modelling the global ocean. ( Siedler G, Church J, Gould WJ, Eds.).:373-386., San Diego, Calif. London: Academic Abstract
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Cronin, MF, Bond N, Booth J, Ichikawa H, Joyce TM, Kelly K, Kubota M, Qiu B, Reason C, Rouault M, Sabine C, Saino T, Small J, Suga T, Talley LD, Thompson LA, Weller RA.  2010.  Monitoring Ocean - Atmosphere Interactions in Western Boundary Current Extensions. Proceedings of OceanObs’09: Sustained Ocean Observations and Information for Society. 2( Hall J, Harrison DE, Stammer D, Eds.).   doi:10.5270/OceanObs09.cwp.20   Abstract
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Speer, KG, Siedler G, Talley L.  1995.  The Namib Col Current. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 42:1933-1950.   10.1016/0967-0637(95)00088-7   AbstractWebsite

Recent measurements indicate the transatlantic extent of the Namib Col Current at depths of 1300-3000 m near Lat. 22 degrees S in the South Atlantic Ocean. This current forms a continuous circulation structure from the Namib Col on the Walvis Ridge to the western trough, though its characteristic change as deepwater with varying properties enters and leaves the current owing to a meridional flow component. Transport estimates from hydrographic sections on the Walvis Ridge and at 15 degrees W near the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge indicate a strength of about 3 x 10(6) m(3) s(-1) The current is part of a larger-scale eastward Row at Lon. 25 degrees W; transport estimates across the salinity maximum core there show a similar strength. Associated with this high-salinity high-oxygen current is a basin-wide front in these properties of varying intensity (weaker in the east) marking the transition to deep water whose North Atlantic characteristics have been partly erased by mixing with Circumpolar Deep Water in the southwest South Atlantic. The water which finally crosses the Walvis Ridge is supplied both by the eastward flow of this (diluted) North Atlantic Deep Water and by a general southeastward interior flow from the northern Angola Basin. Evidence suggests that this deep water continues south in the eastern Cape Basin, leaving the South Atlantic near the African continent.

National Research Council(U.S.). Climate Research Committee..  1995.  Natural climate variability on decade-to-century time scales. :xiv,630p.., Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press Abstract
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Billheimer, S, Talley LD.  2013.  Near cessation of Eighteen Degree Water renewal in the western North Atlantic in the warm winter of 2011-2012. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 118:6838-6853.   10.1002/2013jc009024   AbstractWebsite

The winter of 2011-2012 was a particularly weak season for the renewal of "Eighteen Degree Water" (EDW), the Subtropical Mode Water of the western North Atlantic, as demonstrated by Argo and repeat hydrography. Weak, late winter buoyancy forcing produced shallower than usual winter mixed layers throughout the subtropical gyre, failing to thoroughly ventilate the underlying mode water, and can likely be attributed to the coinciding high, positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The only region where EDW was renewed was in the far northeastern Sargasso Sea where it is understood that the Gulf Stream plays a central role in formation; no EDW formed over the large regions of the gyre where deep winter mixed layers driven by surface buoyancy loss normally create EDW. The present investigation evaluates 2011-2012 winter buoyancy content anomalies, surface buoyancy fluxes, and advection of buoyancy via the Gulf Stream and compares them with the previous seven winters that exhibited more vigorous EDW formation. The weak 2011-2012 formation did not result from increased Gulf Stream heat advection, and was also not driven by preconditioning as the buoyancy content of the region prior to the onset of winter forcing was not unusually high. Rather, the weak formation resulted from climatologically weak surface cooling late in winter. The winter of 2007-2008 also experienced particularly weak EDW formation under similar conditions, including a high NAO and weak late winter surface cooling.

Shcherbina, AY, Talley LD, Firing E, Hacker P.  2003.  Near-surface frontal zone trapping and deep upward propagation of internal wave energy in the Japan/East Sea. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 33:900-912.   10.1175/1520-0485(2003)33<900:nfztad>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The full-depth current structure in the Japan/East Sea was investigated using direct velocity measurements performed with lowered and shipboard acoustic current Doppler profilers. Rotary spectral analysis was used to investigate the three-dimensional energy distribution as well as wave polarization with respect to vertical wave-numbers, yielding information about the net energy propagation direction. Highly energetic near-inertial downward-propagating waves were found in localized patches along the southern edge of the subpolar front. Between 500- and 2500-m depth, the basin average energy propagation was found to be upward, with the maximum of relative difference between upward- and downward-propagating energy lying at about 1500-m depth. This difference was most pronounced in the southeastern part of the basin.

Holte, J, Talley L.  2009.  A New Algorithm for Finding Mixed Layer Depths with Applications to Argo Data and Subantarctic Mode Water Formation. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 26:1920-1939.   10.1175/2009jtecho543.1   AbstractWebsite

A new hybrid method for finding the mixed layer depth (MLD) of individual ocean profiles models the general shape of each profile, searches for physical features in the profile, and calculates threshold and gradient MLDs to assemble a suite of possible MLD values. It then analyzes the patterns in the suite to select a final MLD estimate. The new algorithm is provided in online supplemental materials. Developed using profiles from all oceans, the algorithm is compared to threshold methods that use the C. de Boyer Monte gut et al. criteria and to gradient methods using 13 601 Argo profiles from the southeast Pacific and southwest Atlantic Oceans. In general, the threshold methods find deeper MLDs than the new algorithm and the gradient methods produce more anomalous MLDs than the new algorithm. When constrained to using only temperature profiles, the algorithm offers a clear improvement over the temperature threshold and gradient methods; the new temperature algorithm MLDs more closely approximate the density algorithm MLDs than the temperature threshold and gradient MLDs. The algorithm is applied to profiles from a formation region of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The density algorithm finds that the deepest MLDs in this region routinely reach 500 dbar and occur north of the A. H. Orsi et al. mean Subantarctic Front in the southeastern Pacific Ocean. The deepest MLDs typically occur in August and September and are congruent with the subsurface salinity minimum, a signature of AAIW.