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Johnson, GC, Talley LD.  1997.  Deep tracer and dynamical plumes in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 102:24953-24964.   10.1029/97jc01913   AbstractWebsite

Anomalous middepth plumes in potential temperature-salinity, theta-S, and buoyancy frequency squared, N-2, Originate east of the East Pacific Rise Crest and decay toward the west. Conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data from recent hydrographic sections at 15 degrees S and 10 degrees N are used together with meridional sections at 110 degrees, 135 degrees, and 151 degrees W to map these structures. Warm salty plumes west of the rise crest have maxima centered at 2700 m, 10 degrees S and 8 degrees N, and are interrupted by a cold, fresh tongue centered at 2900 m, 2 degrees S. The theta-S anomalies decay to half their peak strength 2800 km to the west of the rise crest, +/-300 km in the meridional, and +/-0.4 km in the vertical. Vertical N-2 minima occur within the plumes, regions of reduced vertical gradients in theta and S. These minima are underlain by maxima near the depth of the rise crest, about 3200 m. The N-2 plumes decay more rapidly to the west of the rise crest than do the theta-S plumes. The N-2 structure is consistent with a pair of stacked gyres in each hemisphere. There are at least three possible mechanisms consistent with some aspects of these features. First, a deep maximum in upwelling somewhere below 2700 m would result in equatorvard and westward interior flow at 2700 m. advecting these plumes along with it. Second, rapid upwelling of warm, salty, unstratified water in the eastern basins could result in westward overflows over the rise crest. Third, upwelling and associated entrainment processes owing to hydrothermal venting could result in stacked counter-rotating gyres west of the rise crest.

McCarthy, MC, Talley LD, Baringer MO.  1997.  Deep upwelling and diffusivity in the southern Central Indian Basin. Geophysical Research Letters. 24:2801-2804.   10.1029/97gl02112   AbstractWebsite

Transport of the deepest water westward through a gap at 28 degrees S in the Ninetyeast Ridge between the Central Indian Basin and the West Australia Basin is calculated from hydrographic data collected as part of WOCE Hydrographic Program section I8N. Zero reference velocity levels at mid-depth were chosen through consideration of water masses. The small transport of 1.0 Sv westward of water denser than sigma(4) = 45.92 kg m(-3) through the gap must all upwell in the southern Central Indian Basin. Of this, 0.7 Sv upwells between the central and western sill sections, that is, close to the sill itself. Using the areas covered by the isopycnal, we calculate an average vertical velocity of 3.3 . 10(-3) cm s(-1) close to the sill and of 4.2 . 10(-4) cm s(-1) west of the sill. Associated average vertical diffusivities are 105 cm(2) s(-1) close to the sill and 13 cm(2) s(-1) west of the sill, in this bottom layer.

Talley, LD, Johnson GC.  1994.  Deep, Zonal Subequatorial Currents. Science. 263:1125-1128.   10.1126/science.263.5150.1125   AbstractWebsite

Large-scale, westward-extending tongues of warm (Pacific) and cold (Atlantic) water are found between 2000 and 3000 meters both north and south of the equator in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. They are centered at 5-degrees to 8-degrees north and 10-degrees to 15-degrees south (Pacific) and 5-degrees to 8-degrees north and 15-degrees to 20-degrees south (Atlantic). They are separated in both oceans by a contrasting eastward-extending tongue, centered at about 1-degrees to 2-degrees south, in agreement with previous helium isotope observations (Pacific). Thus, the indicated deep tropical westward flows north and south of the equator and eastward flow near the equator may result from more general forcing than the hydrothermal forcing previously hypothesized.

Shcherbina, AY, Talley LD, Rudnick DL.  2004.  Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine rejection. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 109   10.1029/2003jc002196   AbstractWebsite

[1] Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation due to brine rejection in the coastal polynya on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea was studied using two bottom moorings during the winter of 1999 - 2000. A steady salinity and density increase that continued for over a month was observed at the shallower mooring. The maximum density of sigma(theta) = 26.92 kg m(-3) was reached during this period. The density increase terminated abruptly in late February, while the active brine rejection continued for several more weeks based on indirect evidence from water properties and ice cover. This termination was possibly due to the onset of baroclinic instability of the density front at the polynya edge facilitating offshore eddy transport of the density anomaly. Observed periodic baroclinic tide intensification events are hypothesized to be an indicator of the presence of such baroclinic eddies. No significant density increase was observed at the deeper, offshore mooring, indicating a robust demarcation of the offshore extent of newly formed DSW. The relatively fresh water of the tidally mixed zone inshore of the shelf front was the precursor of the DSW, aided by the late-autumn offshore transition of the front.

Shcherbina, AY, Talley LD, Rudnick DL.  2004.  Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 2. Quantifying the transports. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 109   10.1029/2003jc002197   AbstractWebsite

A combination of direct bottom mooring measurements, hydrographic and satellite observations, and meteorological reanalysis was used to estimate the rate of formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) due to brine rejection on the Okhotsk Sea northwestern shelf and the rate of export of DSW from this region. On the basis of remote sensing data, an estimated 8.6x10(12) m(3) of DSW was formed during the winter of 1999-2000, resulting in a mean annual production rate of 0.3 Sv. According to direct observations, the export rate of DSW during this period varied from negligibly small in autumn to 0.75+/-0.27 Sv in winter (January-February), to 0.34+/-0.12 Sv in spring (March-April). From these observations the mean annual export rate can be estimated to be 0.27 Sv. The same relationships used to obtain the integral estimates were also applied differentially using an advective approach incorporating realistic flow and heat flux fields, which allowed direct comparison with the moored observations. The comparison highlights the importance of along-shelf advection and cross-shelf eddy transport to the accurate parameterization of DSW formation.

Talley, LD, Pickard GL, Emery WJ, Swift JH.  2011.  Descriptive physical oceanography : an introduction. :viii,555p.,60p.ofplates., Amsterdam ; Boston: Academic Press Abstract

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Shcherbina, AY, Talley LD, Rudnick DL.  2003.  Direct observations of North Pacific ventilation: Brine rejection in the Okhotsk Sea. Science. 302:1952-1955.   10.1126/science.1088692   AbstractWebsite

Brine rejection that accompanies ice formation in coastal polynyas is responsible for ventilating several globally important water masses in the Arctic and Antarctic. However, most previous studies of this process have been indirect, based on heat budget analyses or on warm-season water column inventories. Here, we present direct measurements of brine rejection and formation of North Pacific Intermediate Water in the Okhotsk Sea from moored winter observations. A steady, nearly linear salinity increase unambiguously caused by local ice formation was observed for more than a month.

Talley, LD, McCartney MS.  1982.  Distribution and Circulation of Labrador Sea-Water. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 12:1189-1205.   10.1175/1520-0485(1982)012<1189:dacols>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Labrador Sea Water is the final product of the cyclonic circulation of Subpolar Mode Water in the open northern North Atlantic (McCartney and Talley, 1982). The temperature and salinity of the convectively formed Subpolar Mode Water decrease from 14.7°C, 36.08‰ to 3.4°C, 34.88‰ on account of the cumulative effects of excess precipitation and cooling. The coldest Mode Water is Labrador Sea Water, which spreads at mid-depths and is found throughout the North Atlantic Ocean north of 40°N and along its western boundary to 18°N.A vertical minimum in potential vorticity is used as the primary tracer for Labrador Sea Water. Labrador Sea Water is advected in three main directions out of the Labrador Sea: 1) northeastward into the Irminger Sea, 2) southeastward across the Atlantic beneath the North Atlantic current, and 3) southward past Newfoundland with the Labrador Current and thence westward into the Slope Water region, crossing under the Gulf Stream off Cape Hatteras.The Labrador Sea Water core is nearly coincident with an isopycnal which also intersects the lower part of the Mediterranean Water, whose high salinity and high potential vorticity balance the low salinity and low potential vorticity of the Labrador Sea Water. Nearly isopycnal mixing between them produces the upper part of the North Atlantic Deep Water.A 27-year data set from the Labrador Sea at Ocean Weather Station Bravo shows decade-long changes in the temperature, salinity, density and formation rate of Labrador Sea Water, indicating that Labrador Sea Water property distributions away from the Labrador Sea are in part due to changes in the source.

Talley, LD.  1993.  Distribution and Formation of North Pacific Intermediate Water. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 23:517-537.   10.1175/1520-0485(1993)023<0517:dafonp>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW), defined as the main salinity minimum in the subtropical North Pacific, is examined with respect to its overall property distributions. These suggest that NPIW is formed only in the northwestern subtropical gyre; that is, in the mixed water region between the Kuroshio Extension and Oyashio front. Subsequent modification along its advective path increases its salinity and reduces its oxygen. The mixed water region is studied using all bottle data available from the National Oceanographic Data Center, with particular emphasis on several winters. Waters from the Oyashio, Kuroshio, and the Tsugaru Warm Current influence the mixed water region, with a well-defined local surface water mass formed as a mixture of the surface waters from these three sources. Significant salinity minima in the mixed water region are grouped into those that are directly related to the winter surface density and are found at the base of the oxygen-saturated surface layer, and those that form deeper, around warm core rings. Both could be a source of the more uniform NPIW to the east, the former through preferential erosion of the minima from the top and the latter through simple advection. Both sources could exist all year with a narrowly defined density range that depends on winter mixed-layer density in the Oyashio region.

Gladyshev, S, Talley L, Kantakov G, Khen G, Wakatsuchi M.  2003.  Distribution, formation, and seasonal variability of Okhotsk Sea Mode Water. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 108   10.1029/2001jc000877   AbstractWebsite

Russian historical data and recently completed conductivity-temperature-depth surveys are used to examine the formation and spread in the deep Ohkotsk Sea of dense shelf water (DSW) produced in the Okhotsk Sea polynyas. Isopycnal analysis indicates that all of the main polynyas contribute to the ventilation at sigma(theta) < 26.80, including the Okhotsk Sea Mode Water (OSMW), which has densities σ(θ) = 26.7-27.0. At densities greater than 26.9 σ(θ) the northwest polynya is the only contributor to OSMW. (Although Shelikhov Bay polynyas produce the densest water with σ(θ) > 27.1, vigorous tidal mixing leads to outflow of water with a density of only about 26.7 sigma(theta)). In the western Okhotsk Sea the East Sakhalin Current rapidly transports modified dense shelf water along the eastern Sakhalin slope to the Kuril Basin, where it is subject to further mixing because of the large anticyclonic eddies and tides. Most of the dense water flows off the shelves in spring. Their average flux does not exceed 0.2 Sv in summer and fall. The shelf water transport and water exchange with the North Pacific cause large seasonal variations of temperature at densities of 26.7-27.0 sigma(theta) (depths of 150-500 m) in the Kuril Basin, where the average temperature minimum occurs in April-May, and the average temperature maximum occurs in September, with a range of 0.2degrees-0.7degreesC. The average seasonal variations of salinity are quite small and do not exceed 0.05 psu. The Soya Water mixed by winter convection, penetrating to depths greater than 200 m, in the southern Kuril Basin also produces freezing water with density greater than 26.7 sigma(theta). Using a simple isopycnal box model and seasonal observations, the OSMW production rate is seen to increase in summer up to 2.2 +/- 1.7 Sv, mainly because of increased North Pacific inflow, and drops in winter to 0.2 +/- 0.1 Sv. A compensating decrease in temperature in the Kuril Basin implies a DSW volume transport of 1.4 +/- 1.1 Sv from February through May. The residence time of the OSMW in the Kuril Basin is 2 +/- 1.7 years.

Talley, LD, Joyce TM.  1992.  The Double Silica Maximum in the North Pacific. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 97:5465-5480.   10.1029/92jc00037   AbstractWebsite

The North Pacific has two vertical silica maxima. The well-known intermediate maximum occurs between 2000 and 2500 m with a potential density relative to 2000 dbar of 36.90 in the northeastern Pacific. The deep maximum, which has not been observed extensively before, is found at or near the ocean bottom in the northern North Pacific in a narrow latitude range. Maps of silica on isopycnals which intersect the intermediate and bottom maxima show that the lowest silica is found in the western tropical North Pacific, suggesting a route for the spread of South Pacific water into the deep North Pacific. Low-silica water is found along the western boundary of the North Pacific, with a separate broad tongue south of Hawaii. The highest silica on both isopycnals is in the northeast Pacific. A bottom maximum in the Cascadia Basin in the northeastern Pacific can be differentiated from both open-ocean maxima. Four sources for the vertical maxima are considered: in situ dissolution of sinking panicles, bottom sediment dissolution, hydrothermal venting, and upslope advection in the northeastern Pacific. Because not enough is known about any of these sources, only rough estimates of their contributions can be made. The bottom maximum is most likely to result from bottom sediment dissolution but requires a flux larger than some current direct estimates. The Cascadia Basin bottom maximum may result from both bottom sediment dissolution and hydrothermal venting. The intermediate maximum is likely to result primarily from dissolution of sinking particles. There is no quantitative estimate of the effect of possible upslope advection or enhancement of bottom fluxes due to the Columbia River outflow.

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Tsuchiya, M, Talley LD, McCartney MS.  1992.  An Eastern Atlantic Section from Iceland Southward across the Equator. Deep-Sea Research Part a-Oceanographic Research Papers. 39:1885-1917.   10.1016/0198-0149(92)90004-d   AbstractWebsite

A long CTD/hydrographic section with closely-spaced stations was occupied in July-August 1988 from Iceland southward to 3-degrees-S along a nominal longitude of 20-degrees-W. The section extends from the surface down to the bottom, and spans the entire mid-ocean circulation regime of the North Atlantic from the subpolar gyre through the subtropical gyre and the equatorial currents. Vertical sections of potential temperature, salinity and potential density from CTD measurements and of oxygen, silica, phosphate and nitrate, based on discrete water-sample measurements are presented and discussed in the context of the large-scale circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. The close spacing of high-quality stations reveals some features not described previously. The more important findings include: (1) possible recirculation of the lightest Subpolar Mode Water into the tropics; (2) a thermostad at temperatures of 8-9-degrees-C, lying below that of the Equatorial 13-degrees-C Water; (3) the nutrient distribution in the low-salinity water above the Mediterranean Outflow Water that supports the previous conjecture of northern influence of the Antarctic Intermediate Water; (4) a great deal of lateral structure of the Mediterranean Outflow Water, with a number of lobes of high salinity; (5) an abrupt southern boundary of the Labrador Sea Water at the Azores-Biscay Rise and a vertically well-mixed region to its south; (6) a sharp demarcation in the central Iceland Basin between the newest Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and older bottom water, which has a significant component of southern water; (7) evidence that the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water is a mixture of the Mediterranean Outflow Water and the Northwest Atlantic Bottom Water with very little input from the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water; (8) an isolated core of the high-salinity, low-silica Upper North Atlantic Deep Water at the equator; (9) a core of the high-oxygen, low-nutrient Lower North Atlantic Deep Water pressed against the southern flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge just south of the equator; (10) a weak minimum of salinity, and well-defined maxima of nutrients associated with the oxygen minimum that separates the Middle and Lower North Atlantic Deep Waters south of the equator; (11) a large body of nearly homogeneous water beneath the Middle North Atlantic Deep Water between 20-degrees-N and the Azores-Biscay Rise; and (12) a deep westward boundary undercurrent on the southern slope of the Rockall Plateau.

Delman, AS, McClean JL, Sprintall J, Talley LD, Yulaeva E, Jayne SR.  2015.  Effects of eddy vorticity forcing on the mean state of the Kuroshio Extension. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 45:1356-1375.   10.1175/jpo-d-13-0259.1   AbstractWebsite

Eddy-mean flow interactions along the Kuroshio Extension (KE) jet are investigated using a vorticity budget of a high-resolution ocean model simulation, averaged over a 13-yr period. The simulation explicitly resolves mesoscale eddies in the KE and is forced with air-sea fluxes representing the years 1995-2007. A mean-eddy decomposition in a jet-following coordinate system removes the variability of the jet path from the eddy components of velocity; thus, eddy kinetic energy in the jet reference frame is substantially lower than in geographic coordinates and exhibits a cross-jet asymmetry that is consistent with the baroclinic instability criterion of the long-term mean field. The vorticity budget is computed in both geographic (i. e., Eulerian) and jet reference frames; the jet frame budget reveals several patterns of eddy forcing that are largely attributed to varicose modes of variability. Eddies tend to diffuse the relative vorticity minima/maxima that flank the jet, removing momentum from the fast-moving jet core and reinforcing the quasi-permanent meridional meanders in the mean jet. A pattern associated with the vertical stretching of relative vorticity in eddies indicates a deceleration (acceleration) of the jet coincident with northward (southward) quasi-permanent meanders. Eddy relative vorticity advection outside of the eastward jet core is balanced mostly by vertical stretching of the mean flow, which through baroclinic adjustment helps to drive the flanking recirculation gyres. The jet frame vorticity budget presents a well-defined picture of eddy activity, illustrating along-jet variations in eddy-mean flow interaction that may have implications for the jet's dynamics and cross-frontal tracer fluxes.

Talley, LD, Raymer ME.  1982.  Eighteen Degree Water variability. Journal of Marine Research. 40:757-775. AbstractWebsite

The Eighteen Degree Water of the western North Atlantic is formed by deep convection in winter. The circulation and changing properties of Eighteen Degree Water are studied using hydrographic data from a long time series at the Panulirus station (32 degrees 10'N, 64 degrees 30'W) and from the Gulf Stream '60 experiment. Due to its relative vertical homogeneity, which persists year-round, the Eighteen Degree Water can be identified by its low potential vorticity (f/rho)(partial derivative rho/partial derivative z). The Eighteen Degree Water is formed in an east-west band of varying characteristics offshore of the Gulf Stream. The Eighteen Degree Water formed at the eastern end of the subtropical gyre recirculates westward past the Panulirus station. Renewal of Eighteen Degree Water occurred regularly from 1954 to 1971, ceased from 1972 to 1975, and began again after 1975. The properties (18 degrees C, 36.5 parts per thousand) of Eighteen Degree Water seen at the Panulirus station were nearly uniform from 1954 to 1964. There was a shift in properties in 1964 and by 1972 the Eighteen Degree Water properties were 17.1 degrees C, 36.4 parts per thousand, The new Eighteen Degree Water formed after 1975 had nearly the same characteristics as that of 1954. The density, potential temperature, salinity and the temperature-salinity relation of the entire upper water column at the Panulirus station changed at the same time as the Eighteen Degree Water properties. The upper water column was denser and colder from 1964 to 1975 than from 1954 to 1964 and after 1975.

Williams, NL, Juranek LW, Johnson KS, Feely RA, Riser SC, Talley LD, Russell JL, Sarmiento JL, Wanninkhof R.  2016.  Empirical algorithms to estimate water column pH in the Southern Ocean. Geophysical Research Letters. 43:3415-3422.   10.1002/2016gl068539   AbstractWebsite

Empirical algorithms are developed using high-quality GO-SHIP hydrographic measurements of commonly measured parameters (temperature, salinity, pressure, nitrate, and oxygen) that estimate pH in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The coefficients of determination, R-2, are 0.98 for pH from nitrate (pH(N)) and 0.97 for pH from oxygen (pH(Ox)) with RMS errors of 0.010 and 0.008, respectively. These algorithms are applied to Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) biogeochemical profiling floats, which include novel sensors (pH, nitrate, oxygen, fluorescence, and backscatter). These algorithms are used to estimate pH on floats with no pH sensors and to validate and adjust pH sensor data from floats with pH sensors. The adjusted float data provide, for the first time, seasonal cycles in surface pH on weekly resolution that range from 0.05 to 0.08 on weekly resolution for the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean.

Ogle, SE, Tamsitt V, Josey SA, Gille ST, Cerovecki I, Talley LD, Weller RA.  2018.  Episodic Southern Ocean heat loss and its mixed layer impacts revealed by the farthest south multiyear surface flux mooring. Geophysical Research Letters. 45:5002-5010.   10.1029/2017gl076909   AbstractWebsite

The Ocean Observatories Initiative air-sea flux mooring deployed at 54.08 degrees S, 89.67 degrees W, in the southeast Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean, is the farthest south long-term open ocean flux mooring ever deployed. Mooring observations (February 2015 to August 2017) provide the first in situ quantification of annual net air-sea heat exchange from one of the prime Subantarctic Mode Water formation regions. Episodic turbulent heat loss events (reaching a daily mean net flux of -294W/m(2)) generally occur when northeastward winds bring relatively cold, dry air to the mooring location, leading to large air-sea temperature and humidity differences. Wintertime heat loss events promote deep mixed layer formation that lead to Subantarctic Mode Water formation. However, these processes have strong interannual variability; a higher frequency of 2 sigma and 3 sigma turbulent heat loss events in winter 2015 led to deep mixed layers (>300m), which were nonexistent in winter 2016.

Bingham, FM, Talley LD.  1991.  Estimates of Kuroshio Transport Using an Inverse Technique. Deep-Sea Research Part a-Oceanographic Research Papers. 38:S21-S43.   10.1016/S0198-0149(12)80003-3   AbstractWebsite

Two CTD/hydrographic sections across the Kuroshio were combined using an inverse technique to estimate the absolute transport. The hydrographic data were obtained as part of a transpacific section across 24-degrees-N in 1985. The inverse technique treats the two sections as ends of a channel and conserves mass flowing into and out of the channel as a whole and within certain discrete layers. The strong topographic constraints imposed by the region of the East China Sea resulted in transport estimates independent of the initial reference level for the geostrophic calculation. The calculated transports were 26.6 Sv northwest of Okinawa and 21.9 Sv across the Tokara Straits. The accuracy of the estimate was approximately 3.3 Sv for the Okinawa section and 5.1 Sv for the Tokara Straits section. The principal errors in the calculation came from lack of knowledge of the flow in the shallow areas of both sections, inadequate sampling of the rapidly varying topography, an estimate of 5 Sv transport in the Tsushima Current and Osumi branch of the Kuroshio and uncertainty over the relative weighting given in the inverse solutions to the different sections. A set of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data taken simultaneously was combined with the inverse model. Because initial mass imbalances were smaller, the combined model gave a better estimate of transport than that of the model using the CTD data alone. Two different methods of using the ADCP data in the inverse model were compared. It was found to be preferable to use the ADCP data as an initial reference for the geostrophic velocities, rather than as a set of separate constraints.

Talley, LD, White WB.  1987.  Estimates of Time and Space Scales at 300-Meters in the Midlatitude North Pacific from the Transpac-Xbt Program. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 17:2168-2188.   10.1175/1520-0485(1987)017<2168:eotass>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Estimates of length and time scales of temperature variability at 300 meters in the midlatitude North Pacific are made. Data are XBT traces collected from 1976 to 1984 in the TRANSPAC Volunteer Observing Ship program. Temperatures at 300 meters are grouped in two-mouth bins and gridded using the Surface II mapping program.Temperature variance about the time mean is largest in the Kuroshio Extension and nearly constant in the eastern North Pacific. A cooling trend occurred in the eastern North Pacific over the eight years of the dataset. In the western Pacific, the annual cycle is most intense 1°–2° north of the Kuroshio Extension, with an indication of meridional propagation away from the region of most intense variability. Propagation of annual waves in the eastern Pacific was predominantly northwestward.Wavenumber and frequency spectra are computed from normalized temperatures with the mean and bimonthly average removed in order to eliminate the dominant annual cycle. Based on the overall temperature variance, the North Pacific was divided into western and eastern regions. Zonal wavenumber and frequency spectra and two-dimensional ω/k spectra were computed for a number of latitudes in the eastern and western regions. Two-dimensional k/l spectra were also computed for the western and eastern regions. The spectra indicate westward propagation throughout the midlatitude North Pacific with additional eastward propagation in the Kuroshio Extension region, shorter length and time scales in the Kuroshio Extension compared with other regions, and slight dominance of southwestward propagation in bath the eastern and western North Pacific.Tests to determine the effective spatial resolution of the dataset indicate that local average-station spacing is a good measure of local Nyquist wavelength. However, because of the nearly random sampling in a spatially limited region, an unresolved wave is aliased more or less in a band stretching towards low wavenumber rather than folded in coherent, predictable locations in the spectrum. With the choice of a two-month time bin, spectra are about equally aliased in space and time, with Nyquist wavelength and period close to the beginning of energy rolloff reported in other surveys, which have better spatial resolution but less degrees of freedom.

Whalen, CB, MacKinnon JA, Talley LD, Waterhouse AF.  2015.  Estimating the mean diapycnal mixing using a finescale strain parameterization. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 45:1174-1188.   10.1175/jpo-d-14-0167.1   AbstractWebsite

Finescale methods are currently being applied to estimate the mean turbulent dissipation rate and diffusivity on regional and global scales. This study evaluates finescale estimates derived from isopycnal strain by comparing them with average microstructure profiles from six diverse environments including the equator, above ridges, near seamounts, and in strong currents. The finescale strain estimates are derived from at least 10 nearby Argo profiles (generally <60 km distant) with no temporal restrictions, including measurements separated by seasons or decades. The absence of temporal limits is reasonable in these cases, since the authors find the dissipation rate is steady over seasonal time scales at the latitudes being considered (0 degrees-30 degrees and 40 degrees-50 degrees). In contrast, a seasonal cycle of a factor of 2-5 in the upper 1000m is found under storm tracks (30 degrees-40 degrees) in both hemispheres. Agreement between the mean dissipation rate calculated using Argo profiles and mean from microstructure profiles is within a factor of 2-3 for 96% of the comparisons. This is both congruous with the physical scaling underlying the finescale parameterization and indicates that the method is effective for estimating the regional mean dissipation rates in the open ocean.

Shi, JR, Xie SP, Talley LD.  2018.  Evolving relative importance of the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic in anthropogenic ocean heat uptake. Journal of Climate. 31:7459-7479.   10.1175/jcli-d-18-0170.1   AbstractWebsite

Ocean uptake of anthropogenic heat over the past 15 years has mostly occurred in the Southern Ocean, based on Argo float observations. This agrees with historical simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), where the Southern Ocean (south of 30 degrees S) accounts for 72% +/- 28% of global heat uptake, while the contribution from the North Atlantic north of 30 degrees N is only 6%. Aerosols preferentially cool the Northern Hemisphere, and the effect on surface heat flux over the subpolar North Atlantic opposes the greenhouse gas (GHG) effect in nearly equal magnitude. This heat uptake compensation is associated with weakening (strengthening) of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in response to GHG (aerosol) radiative forcing. Aerosols are projected to decline in the near future, reinforcing the greenhouse effect on the North Atlantic heat uptake. As a result, the Southern Ocean, which will continue to take up anthropogenic heat largely through the mean upwelling of water from depth, will be joined by increased relative contribution from the North Atlantic because of substantial AMOC slowdown in the twenty-first century. In the RCP8.5 scenario, the percentage contribution to global uptake is projected to decrease to 48% +/- 8% in the Southern Ocean and increase to 26% +/- 6% in the northern North Atlantic. Despite the large uncertainty in the magnitude of projected aerosol forcing, our results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols, given their geographic distributions and temporal trajectories, strongly influence the high-latitude ocean heat uptake and interhemispheric asymmetry through AMOC change.

Billheimer, S, Talley LD.  2016.  Extraordinarily weak Eighteen Degree Water production concurs with strongly positive North Atlantic Oscillation in late winter 2014/15. State of the Climate in 2015. 97( Blunden J, Arndt DS, Eds.).:Si-S275.   10.1175/2016BAMSStateoftheClimate.1   Abstract

In summary, winter 2014/15 was the weakest EDWformation year on record during the Argo era and wasassociated with an extreme, strongly positive winterNAO. Three of the past four winters have had belowaverage EDW renewal, with the most recent being themost extreme.

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Hartin, CA, Fine RA, Sloyan BM, Talley LD, Chereskin TK, Happell J.  2011.  Formation rates of Subantarctic mode water and Antarctic intermediate water within the South Pacific. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 58:524-534.   10.1016/j.dsr.2011.02.010   AbstractWebsite

The formation of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) significantly contributes to the total uptake and storage of anthropogenic gases, such as CO(2) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), within the world's oceans. SAMW and AAIW formation rates in the South Pacific are quantified based on CFC-12 inventories using hydrographic data from WOCE. CLIVAR, and data collected in the austral winter of 2005. This study documents the first wintertime observations of CFC-11 and CFC-12 saturations with respect to the 2005 atmosphere in the formation region of the southeast Pacific for SAMW and AAIW. SAMW is 94% and 95% saturated for CFC-11 and CFC-12, respectively, and AAIW is 60% saturated for both CFC-11 and CFC-12. SAMW is defined from the Subantarctic Front to the equator between potential densities 26.80-27.06 kg m(-3), and AAIW is defined from the Polar Front to 20 degrees N between potential densities 27.06-27.40 kg m(-3). CFC-12 inventories are 16.0 x 10(6) moles for SAMW and 8.7 x 10(6) moles for AAIW, corresponding to formation rates of 7.3 +/- 2.1 Sv for SAMW and 5.8 +/- 1.7 Sv for AAIW circulating within the South Pacific. Inter-ocean transports of SAMW from the South Pacific to the South Atlantic are estimated to be 4.4 +/- 0.6 Sv. Thus, the total formation of SAMW in the South Pacific is approximately 11.7 +/- 2.2 Sv. These formation rates represent the average formation rates over the major period of CFC input, from 1970 to 2005. The CFC-12 inventory maps provide direct evidence for two areas of formation of SAMW, one in the southeast Pacific and one in the central Pacific. Furthermore, eddies in the central Pacific containing high CFC concentrations may contribute to SAMW and to a lesser extent AAIW formation. These CFC-derived rates provide a baseline with which to compare past and future formation rates of SAMW and AAIW. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Talley, LD.  2008.  Freshwater transport estimates and the global overturning circulation: Shallow, deep and throughflow components. Progress in Oceanography. 78:257-303.   10.1016/j.pocean.2008.05.001   AbstractWebsite

Meridional ocean freshwater transports and convergences are calculated from absolute geostrophic velocities and Ekman transports. The freshwater transports are analyzed in terms of mass-balanced contributions from the shallow, ventilated circulation of the subtropical gyres, intermediate and deep water overturns, and Indonesian Throughflow and Bering Strait components. The following are the major conclusions: 1. Excess freshwater in high latitudes must be transported to the evaporative lower latitudes, as is well known. The calculations here show that the northern hemisphere transports most of its high latitude freshwater equatorward through North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation (as in [Rahmstorf, S., 1996. On the freshwater forcing and transport of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. Climate Dynamics 12, 799-811]), in which saline subtropical surface waters absorb the freshened Arctic and subpolar North Atlantic surface waters (0.45 +/- 0.15 Sv for a 15 Sv overturn), plus a small contribution from the high latitude North Pacific through Bering Strait (0.06 +/- 0.02 Sv). In the North Pacific, formation of 2.4 Sv of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) transports 0.07 +/- 0.02 Sv of freshwater equatorward. In complete contrast, almost all of the 0.61 +/- 0.13 Sv of freshwater gained in the Southern Ocean is transported equatorward in the upper ocean, in roughly equal magnitudes of about 0.2 Sv each in the three subtropical gyres, with a smaller contribution of <0. 1 Sv from the Indonesian Throughflow loop through the Southern Ocean. The large Southern Ocean deep water formation (27 Sv) exports almost no freshwater (0.01 +/- 0.03 Sv) or actually imports freshwater if deep overturns in each ocean are considered separately (-0.06 +/- 0.04 Sv). This northern-southern hemisphere asymmetry is likely a consequence of the "Drake Passage" effect, which limits the southward transport of warm, saline surface waters into the Antarctic [Toggweiler, J.R., Samuels, B., 1995a. Effect of Drake Passage on the global thermohaline circulation. Deep-Sea Research 1 42(4), 477-500]. The salinity contrast between the deep Atlantic, Pacific and Indian source waters and the denser new Antarctic waters is limited by their small temperature contrast, resulting in small freshwater transports. No such constraint applies to NADW formation, which draws on warm, saline subtropical surface waters. 2. The Atlantic/Arctic and Indian Oceans are net evaporative basins, hence import freshwater via ocean circulation. For the Atlantic/Arctic north of 32 degrees S, freshwater import (0.28 +/- 0.04 Sv) comes from the Pacific through Bering Strait (0.06 0.02 Sv), from the Southern Ocean via the shallow gyre circulation (0.20 +/- 0.02 Sv), and from three nearly canceling conversions to the NADW layer (0.02 0.02 Sv): from saline Benguela Current surface water (-0.05 +/- 0.01 Sv), fresh AAIW (0.06 0.01 Sv) and fresh AABW/LCDW (0.01 0.01 Sv). Thus, the NADW freshwater balance is nearly closed within the Atlantic/Arctic Ocean and the freshwater transport associated with export of NADW to the Southern Ocean is only a small component of the Atlantic freshwater budget. For the Indian Ocean north of 32 degrees S, import of the required 0.37 +/- 0.10 Sv of freshwater comes from the Pacific through the Indonesian Throughflow (0.23 +/- 0.05 Sv) and the Southern Ocean via the shallow gyre circulation (0.18 +/- 0.02 Sv), with a small export southward due to freshening of bottom waters as they upwell into deep and intermediate waters (-0.04 +/- 0.03 Sv). The Pacific north of 28 degrees S is essentially neutral with respect to freshwater, -0.04 +/- 0.09 Sv. This is the nearly balancing sum of export to the Atlantic through Bering Strait (-0.07 +/- 0.02 Sv), export to the Indian through the Indonesian Throughflow (-0.17 +/- 0.05 Sv), a negligible export due to freshening of upwelled bottom waters (-0.03 +/- 0.03 Sv), and import of 0.23 +/- 0.04 Sv from the Southern Ocean via the shallow gyre circulation. 3. Bering Strait's small freshwater transport of <0.1 Sv helps maintains the Atlantic-Pacific salinity difference. However, proportionally large variations in the small Bering Strait transport would only marginally impact NADW salinity, whose freshening relative to saline surface water is mainly due to air-sea/runoff fluxes in the subpolar North Atlantic and Arctic. In contrast, in the Pacific, because the total overturning rate is much smaller than in the Atlantic, Bering Strait freshwater export has proportionally much greater impact on North Pacific salinity balances, including NPIW salinity. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

National Research Council(U.S.). Committee on Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean., Board. NRCPR(US).  2011.  Future science opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. :1onlineresource(xiv,195pages)., Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press AbstractWebsite

"Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean remains one of the world's last frontiers. Covering nearly 14 million km p2 s (an area approximately 1.4 times the size of the United States), Antarctica is the coldest, driest, highest, and windiest continent on Earth. While it is challenging to live and work in this extreme environment, this region offers many opportunities for scientific research. Ever since the first humans set foot on Antarctica a little more than a century ago, the discoveries made there have advanced our scientific knowledge of the region, the world, and the Universe--but there is still much more to learn. However, conducting scientific research in the harsh environmental conditions of Antarctica is profoundly challenging. Substantial resources are needed to establish and maintain the infrastructure needed to provide heat, light, transportation, and drinking water, while at the same time minimizing pollution of the environment and ensuring the safety of researchers. Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean suggests actions for the United States to achieve success for the next generation of Antarctic and Southern Ocean science. The report highlights important areas of research by encapsulating each into a single, overarching question. The questions fall into two broad themes: (1) those related to global change, and (2) those related to fundamental discoveries. In addition, the report identified key science questions that will drive research in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in coming decades, and highlighted opportunities to be leveraged to sustain and improve the U.S. research efforts in the region."--Publisher's description.

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Salmon, R, Talley LD.  1989.  Generalizations of Arakawas Jacobian. Journal of Computational Physics. 83:247-259.   10.1016/0021-9991(89)90118-6   AbstractWebsite

A simple method yields discrete Jacobians that obey analogues of the differential properties needed to conserve energy and enstrophy in 2-dimensional flow. The method is actually independent of the type of discretization and thus applies to an arbitrary representation in gridpoints, finite elements, or spectral modes, or to any mixture of the three. We illustrate the method by deriving simple energy- and enstrophy-conserving Jacobians for an irregular triangular mesh in a closed domain, and for a mixed gridpoint-and-mode representation in a semi-infinite channel.