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Shcherbina, AY, Rudnick DL, Talley LD.  2005.  Ice-draft profiling from bottom-mounted ADCP data. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 22:1249-1266.   10.1175/jtech1776.1   AbstractWebsite

The feasibility of ice-draft profiling using an upward-looking bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is demonstrated. Ice draft is determined as the difference between the instrument depth, derived from high-accuracy pressure data, and the distance to the lower ice surface, determined by the ADCP echo travel time. Algorithms for the surface range estimate from the water-track echo intensity profiles, data quality control, and correction procedures have been developed. Sources of error in using an ADCP as an ice profiler were investigated using the models of sound signal propagation and reflection. The effects of atmospheric pressure changes, sound speed variation, finite instrument beamwidth, hardware signal processing, instrument tilt, beam misalignment, and vertical sensor offset are quantified. The developed algorithms are tested using the data from the winter-long ADCP deployment on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea.

Tishchenko, PY, Talley LD, Lobanov VB, Nedashkovskii AP, Pavlova GY, Sagalaev SG.  2007.  The influence of geochemical processes in the near-bottom layer on the hydrochemical characteristics of the waters of the Sea of Japan. Oceanology. 47:350-359.   10.1134/s0001437007030071   AbstractWebsite

According to the results of the international expedition aboard the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Professor Khromov in the summer 1999, areas with low oxygen contents (below 210 mu M/kg) and those with increased contents of dissolved inorganic carbon and phosphates were found that roughly coincided with one another. These areas are located near the bottom on the southwestern slope of the Tsushima Basin in the region of the Korea Strait and on the continental slope in the region of the Tatar Strait in the northern part of the sea at about 46 degrees N. The set of hydrochemical data points to a high geochemical activity in the near-bottom layer of the areas noted. This activity is confirmed by direct observations of the composition of the interstitial water in the sediments collected in the northern part of the sea during the expedition of R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrent'ev in 2003. It was supposed that the main cause of the increased geochemical activity is the runoff of suspended and dissolved matter from the Korea and Tatar straits. In the areas mentioned, the near-bottom waters are characterized by low values of the nitrogen-phosphorus ratio (below 10), which is geochemical proof of the denitrification process occurring under the conditions of high oxygen concentrations characteristic of the Sea of Japan. Based on the value of the annual production in the Sea of Japan, a rate of denitrification equal to 3.4 x 10(12) gN/year was calculated. Hence, it is confirmed that the geochemical processes in the near-bottom layer have a direct influence on the spatiotemporal characteristics of the hydrochemical properties of the waters of the Sea of Japan.

Flatau, M, Talley L, Musgrave D.  2000.  Interannual variability in the Gulf of Alaska during the 1991-94 El Nino. Journal of Climate. 13:1664-1673.   10.1175/1520-0442(2000)013<1664:ivitgo>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Mass and heat budgets in the Gulf of Alaska during the 1991-94 El Nino are examined using hydrographic data from several cruises undertaken as part of the International North Pacific Ocean Climate program and the repeated Canadian hydrographic sections out to Ocean weather Station Papa. The geostrophic ocean circulation resulted in convergence of heat into the region in spring 1992 and spring 1993. The advective heat convergence in spring 1992 corresponded to an average surface heat flux from the ocean to the atmosphere of about 74 W m(-2) in comparison with only 30 W m(-2) during spring 1993. The larger ocean heat loss to the atmosphere in 1992 followed a winter of large tropical SST anomalies and anomalously low pressure in the Aleutian low.