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2019
Talley, LD, Rosso I, Kamenkovich I, Mazloff MR, Wang J, Boss E, Gray AR, Johnson KS, Key RM, Riser SC, Williams NL, Sarmiento JL.  2019.  Southern Ocean biogeochemical float deployment strategy, with example from the Greenwich meridian line (GO-SHIP A12). Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 124:403-431.   10.1029/2018jc014059   AbstractWebsite

Biogeochemical Argo floats, profiling to 2,000-m depth, are being deployed throughout the Southern Ocean by the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling program (SOCCOM). The goal is 200 floats by 2020, to provide the first full set of annual cycles of carbon, oxygen, nitrate, and optical properties across multiple oceanographic regimes. Building from no prior coverage to a sparse array, deployments are based on prior knowledge of water mass properties, mean frontal locations, mean circulation and eddy variability, winds, air-sea heat/freshwater/carbon exchange, prior Argo trajectories, and float simulations in the Southern Ocean State Estimate and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Twelve floats deployed from the 2014-2015 Polarstern cruise from South Africa to Antarctica are used as a test case to evaluate the deployment strategy adopted for SOCCOM's 20 deployment cruises and 126 floats to date. After several years, these floats continue to represent the deployment zones targeted in advance: (1) Weddell Gyre sea ice zone, observing the Antarctic Slope Front, and a decadally-rare polynya over Maud Rise; (2) Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) including the topographically steered Southern Zone chimney where upwelling carbon/nutrient-rich deep waters produce surprisingly large carbon dioxide outgassing; (3) Subantarctic and Subtropical zones between the ACC and Africa; and (4) Cape Basin. Argo floats and eddy-resolving HYCOM simulations were the best predictors of individual SOCCOM float pathways, with uncertainty after 2years of order 1,000km in the sea ice zone and more than double that in and north of the ACC.

1999
McCarthy, MC, Talley LD.  1999.  Three-dimensional isoneutral potential vorticity structure in the Indian Ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 104:13251-13267.   10.1029/1999jc900028   AbstractWebsite

The three-dimensional isoneutral potential vorticity structure of the Indian Ocean is examined using World Ocean Circulation Experiment and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration conductivity-temperature-depth data and historical bottle data. The distribution of the potential vorticity is set by the Indian Ocean's source waters and their circulation inside the basin. The lower thermocline has a high potential vorticity signal extending westward from northwest of Australia and a low signal from the Subantarctic Mode Water in the south. The Antarctic Intermediate Water inflow creates patches of high potential vorticity at intermediate depths in the southern Indian Ocean, below which the field becomes dominated by planetary vorticity, indicating a weaker meridional circulation and weaker potential vorticity sources. Wind-driven gyre depths have lower potential vorticity gradients primarily due to same-source waters. Homogenization and western shadow zones are not observed. The P-effect dominates the effect of the Somali Current and the Red Sea Water on the potential vorticity distribution. Isopleths tilt strongly away from latitude lines in the deep and abyssal waters as the Circumpolar Deep Water fills the basins in deep western boundary currents, indicating a strong meridional circulation north of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The lower-gradient intermediate layer surrounded vertically by layers with higher meridional potential vorticity gradients in the subtropical Indian Ocean suggests that Rossby waves will travel similar to 1.3 times faster than standard theory predicts. To the south, several pools of homogenized potential vorticity appear in the upper 2000 m of the Southern Ocean where gyres previously have been identified. South of Australia the abyssal potential vorticity structure is set by a combination of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the bathymetry.

Talley, LD.  1999.  Simple coupled midlatitude climate models. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 29:2016-2037.   10.1175/1520-0485(1999)029<2016:scmcm>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

A set of simple analytical models is presented and evaluated for interannual to decadal coupled ocean-atmosphere modes at midlatitudes. The atmosphere and ocean are each in Sverdrup balance at these long timescales. The atmosphere's temperature response to heating determines the spatial phase relation between SST and sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies. Vertical advection balancing heating produces high (low) SLP lying east of warm (cold) SST anomalies, as observed in the Antarctic circumpolar wave (ACW), the decadal North Pacific mode, and the interannual North Atlantic mode. Zonal advection in an atmosphere with a rigid lid produces low SLP east of warm SST. However, if an ad hoc equivalent barotropic atmospheric response is assumed, high SLP lies east of warm SST. Relaxation to heating produces behavior like the observed North Atlantic decadal pattern, with low SLP over warm SST. Meridional advection in the atmosphere cannot produce the observed SST/SLP patterns. The dominant balance in the oceans temperature equation determines the phase speed of the modes. The coupled mode is nondispersive in all models examined here, indicating the need for additional processes. For modes with an SST-SLP offset as observed in the ACW and North Pacific, Ekman convergence acting as a heat source causes eastward propagation relative to the mean ocean flow. Sverdrup response to Ekman convergence, acting on the mean meridional temperature gradient, causes westward propagation relative to the mean ocean Row. When the ocean temperature adjusts through surface heat flux alone, the mode is advected by the mean ocean flow and is damped. Relaxation to heating in the atmosphere, when operating with Sverdrup response in the ocean, produces the only complete solution presented here that exhibits growth, with an a-folding timescale of order (100 days). This solution appears appropriate for the North Atlantic decadal mode. In Northern Hemisphere basins, with meridional boundaries, the: same sets of dynamics create the observed SST-SLP phase relation. An additional factor is the creation of SST anomalies through variations in the western boundary current strengths, which are related to the zonally integrated wind stress curl over the whole basin. If barotropic and hence fast adjustment is assumed, the resulting positive feedback can maintain or strengthen the coupled anomalies in the North Pacific and interannual North Atlantic modes.