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2006
Park, GH, Lee K, Tishchenko P, Min DH, Warner MJ, Talley LD, Kang DJ, Kim KR.  2006.  Large accumulation of anthropogenic CO(2) in the East (Japan) Sea and its significant impact on carbonate chemistry. Global Biogeochemical Cycles. 20   10.1029/2005gb002676   AbstractWebsite

[ 1] This paper reports on a basin-wide inventory of anthropogenic CO(2) in the East ( Japan) Sea determined from high-quality alkalinity, chlorofluorocarbon, and nutrient data collected during a summertime survey in 1999 and total dissolved inorganic carbon data calculated from pH and alkalinity measurements. The data set comprises measurements from 203 hydrographic stations and covers most of the East Sea with the exception of the northwestern boundary region. Anthropogenic CO(2) concentrations are estimated by separating this value from total dissolved inorganic carbon using a tracer-based ( chlorofluorocarbon) separation technique. Wintertime surface CFC-12 data collected in regions of deep water formation off Vladivostok, Russia, improve the accuracy of estimates of anthropogenic CO(2) concentrations by providing improved air-sea CO(2) disequilibrium values for intermediate and deep waters. Our calculation yields a total anthropogenic CO(2) inventory in the East Sea of 0.40 +/- 0.06 petagrams of carbon as of 1999. Anthropogenic CO(2) has already reached the bottom of the East Sea, largely owing to the effective transport of anthropogenic CO(2) from the surface to the ocean interior via deep water formation in the waters off Vladivostok. The highest specific column inventory ( vertically integrated inventory per square meter) of anthropogenic CO(2) of 80 mol C m(-2) is found in the Japan Basin ( 40 degrees N - 44 degrees N). Comparison of this inventory with those for other major basins of the same latitude band reveal that the East Sea values are much higher than the inventory for the Pacific Ocean (20 - 30 mol C m(-2)) and are similar to the inventory for the North Atlantic (66 - 72 mol C m(-2)). The substantial accumulation of anthropogenic CO(2) in the East Sea during the industrial era has caused the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons to move upward by 80 - 220 m and 500 - 700 m, respectively. These upward movements are approximately 5 times greater than those found in the North Pacific. Both the large accumulation of anthropogenic CO(2) and its significant impact on carbonate chemistry in the East Sea suggest that this sea is an important site for monitoring the future impact of the oceanic invasion of anthropogenic CO(2).

2003
Tishchenko, PY, Talley LD, Lobanov VB, Zhabin IA, Luchm VA, Nedashkovskii AP, Sagalaev SG, Chichkin RV, Shkirnikova EM, Ponomarev VI, Masten D, Kang DJ, Kim KR.  2003.  Seasonal variability of the hydrochemical conditions in the sea of Japan. Oceanology. 43:643-655. AbstractWebsite

In the summer of 1999 and the winter of 2000, during international expeditions of R/Vs Professor Khromov and Roger Revelle, hydrological and hydrochemical studies of the Sea of Japan were performed. Comparing the hydrochemical characteristics of the Sea of Japan in the summer and winter seasons, we have found that the seasonal variability affects not only the upper quasihomogeneous layer but also the deeper layers. This variability is caused by the intensification of vertical mixing during the winter season. It was shown that the mixing intensification in the deep layers of the sea in the winter might be caused both by the slope convection and by the deep convection in the open part of the sea, penetrating deeper than 1000 in. It was found that the area of positive values of the biological constituent of the apparent oxygen consumption coincides with the area of deep convection. The climatic zoning in the distribution of partial pressure of carbon dioxide was revealed for both seasons. In the northwestern part of the sea, carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere due to the deep convection in the winter and the heating process in the summer. The southern part of the sea absorbs the atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the process of photosynthesis and cooling of the waters supplied from the Korea Strait.

Talley, LD, Lobanov V, Ponomarev V, Salyuk A, Tishchenko P, Zhabin I, Riser S.  2003.  Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea. Geophysical Research Letters. 30   10.1029/2002gl016451   AbstractWebsite

Direct water mass renewal through convection deeper than 1000 m and the independent process of dense water production through brine rejection during sea ice formation occur at only a limited number of sites globally. Our late winter observations in 2000 and 2001 show that the Japan (East) Sea is a part of both exclusive groups. Japan Sea deep convection apparently occurs every winter, but massive renewal of bottom waters through brine rejection had not occurred for many decades prior to the extremely cold winter of 2001. The sites for both renewal mechanisms are south of Vladivostok, in the path of cold continental air outbreaks.