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Treguier, AM, Theetten S, Chassignet EP, Penduff T, Smith R, Talley L, Beismann JO, Boning C.  2005.  The North Atlantic subpolar gyre in four high-resolution models. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 35:757-774.   10.1175/jpo2720.1   AbstractWebsite

The authors present the first quantitative comparison between new velocity datasets and high-resolution models in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre [1/10 degrees Parallel Ocean Program model (POPNA10), Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), 1/6 degrees Atlantic model (ATL6), and Family of Linked Atlantic Ocean Model Experiments (FLAME)]. At the surface, the model velocities agree generally well with World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) drifter data. Two noticeable exceptions are the weakness of the East Greenland coastal current in models and the presence in the surface layers of a strong southwestward East Reykjanes Ridge Current. At depths, the most prominent feature of the circulation is the boundary current following the continental slope. In this narrow flow, it is found that gridded float datasets cannot be used for a quantitative comparison with models. The models have very different patterns of deep convection, and it is suggested that this could be related to the differences in their barotropic transport at Cape Farewell. Models show a large drift in watermass properties with a salinization of the Labrador Sea Water. The authors believe that the main cause is related to horizontal transports of salt because models with different forcing and vertical mixing share the same salinization problem. A remarkable feature of the model solutions is the large westward transport over Reykjanes Ridge [10 Sv (Sv = 10(6) m(3) s(-1)) or more].

Tsuchiya, M, Talley LD, McCartney MS.  1994.  Water-Mass Distributions in the Western South-Atlantic - a Section from South Georgia Island (54s) Northward across the Equator. Journal of Marine Research. 52:55-&.   10.1357/0022240943076759   AbstractWebsite

A long CTD/hydrographic section with closely spaced stations was made in February-April 1989 in the western Atlantic Ocean between 0-degrees-40'N and South Georgia (54S) along a nominal longitude of 25W. Vertical sections of various properties from CTD and discrete water-sample measurements are presented and discussed in terms of the large-scale circulation of the South Atlantic Ocean. One of the most important results is the identification of various deep-reaching fronts in relation to the large-scale circulation and the distribution of mode waters. Five major fronts are clearly defined in the thermal and salinity fields. These are the Polar (49.5S), Subantarctic (45S), Subtropical (41-42S), Brazil Current (35S) Fronts, and an additional front at 20-22S. The first three are associated with strong baroclinic shear. The Brazil Current Front is a boundary between the denser and lighter types of the Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW), and the 20-22S front marks the boundary between the anticyclonic subtropical and cyclonic subequatorial gyres. The latter front coincides with the northern terminus of the high-oxygen tongue of the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) and also with the abrupt shift in density of the high-silica tongue originating in the Upper Circumpolar Water and extending northward. Two pycnostads with temperatures 20-24-degrees-C are observed between 10S and 25S with the denser one in the subtropical and the other lighter one in the subequatorial gyre. A weak thermostad centered at 4-degrees-C occurs in the AAIW between the Subtropical Front and the Subantarctic Front and shows characteristics similar to the densest variety of the SAMW. Another significant result is a detailed description of the complex structure of the deep and bottom waters. The North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) north of 25S contains two vertical maxima of oxygen (at 2000 m and 3700 m near the equator) separated by intervening low-oxygen water with more influence from the Circumpolar Water. Each maximum is associated with a maximum of salinity and minima of nutrients. The deeper salinity maximum is only weakly defined and is limited to north of 18S, appearing more as vertically uniform salinity. South of 25S the NADW shows only a single maximum of salinity, a single maximum of oxygen, and a single minimum of each nutrient, all lying close together. The salinity maximum south of 25S and the deeper oxygen/salinity maximum north of 1 IS are derived from the same source waters. The less dense NADW containing the shallower extrema of characteristics turns to the east at lower latitudes and does not reach the region south of 25S. The southward spreading of the NADW is interrupted by domains of intensified circumpolar characteristics. This structure is closely related to the basin-scale gyre circulation pattern. The Weddell Sea Deep Water is the densest water we observed and forms a relatively homogeneous layer at the bottom of the Georgia and Argentine Basins. The bottom layer of the Brazil Basin is occupied by the vertically and laterally homogeneous Lower Circumpolar Water.

Tsuchiya, M, Talley LD.  1996.  Water-property distributions along an eastern Pacific hydrographic section at 135W. Journal of Marine Research. 54:541-564.   10.1357/0022240963213583   AbstractWebsite

As part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, full-depth CTD/hydrographic measurements with high horizontal and vertical resolutions were made in June-August 1991 along a line extending from 34N to 33S at a nominal longitude of 135W with an additional short leg that connects it to the California coast roughly along 34N. The line spans the major part of the subtropical and intertropical circulation regime of the eastern North and South Pacific. The primary purpose of this paper is to present vertical sections of various properties from CTD and discrete water-sample measurements along this line and to give an overview of some important features as a basis for more comprehensive basin-scale studies. These features include: the frontal structures found in the surface-layer salinity field in the North Pacific; relatively high-salinity water that dominates the subpycnocline layer between the equator and 17N; troughs of the subpycnocline isopycnals for 26.8-27.5 sigma(theta) found at 12N and 12.5S; a permanent thermostad at 9-10 degrees C observed between 4.5N and 15N; the pycnostad of the Subantarctic Mode Water centered at 27.0-27.05 sigma(theta) and developed south of 22S; two types of the Antarctic Intermediate Water representing the subtropical and equatorial circulation regimes; a thick tongue of high silica centered at 3000 m (45.8 sigma(4)) and extending southward across the entire section; deep (2000-3000 m) westward flows at 5-8N and 10-15S separated by an eastward flow at 1-2S; and dense, cold, oxygen-rich, nutrient-poor bottom waters, which are associated with fracture zones and believed to represent the pathways of eastward flows into the Northeast Pacific Basin of the bottom waters separated from the northward-flowing western boundary undercurrent. This work once again demonstrates the usefulness of long lines of high-quality, high-resolution hydrographic stations such as the one described herein in advancing the understanding of the large-scale ocean circulation.

Tsuchiya, M, Talley LD, McCartney MS.  1992.  An Eastern Atlantic Section from Iceland Southward across the Equator. Deep-Sea Research Part a-Oceanographic Research Papers. 39:1885-1917.   10.1016/0198-0149(92)90004-d   AbstractWebsite

A long CTD/hydrographic section with closely-spaced stations was occupied in July-August 1988 from Iceland southward to 3-degrees-S along a nominal longitude of 20-degrees-W. The section extends from the surface down to the bottom, and spans the entire mid-ocean circulation regime of the North Atlantic from the subpolar gyre through the subtropical gyre and the equatorial currents. Vertical sections of potential temperature, salinity and potential density from CTD measurements and of oxygen, silica, phosphate and nitrate, based on discrete water-sample measurements are presented and discussed in the context of the large-scale circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. The close spacing of high-quality stations reveals some features not described previously. The more important findings include: (1) possible recirculation of the lightest Subpolar Mode Water into the tropics; (2) a thermostad at temperatures of 8-9-degrees-C, lying below that of the Equatorial 13-degrees-C Water; (3) the nutrient distribution in the low-salinity water above the Mediterranean Outflow Water that supports the previous conjecture of northern influence of the Antarctic Intermediate Water; (4) a great deal of lateral structure of the Mediterranean Outflow Water, with a number of lobes of high salinity; (5) an abrupt southern boundary of the Labrador Sea Water at the Azores-Biscay Rise and a vertically well-mixed region to its south; (6) a sharp demarcation in the central Iceland Basin between the newest Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and older bottom water, which has a significant component of southern water; (7) evidence that the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water is a mixture of the Mediterranean Outflow Water and the Northwest Atlantic Bottom Water with very little input from the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water; (8) an isolated core of the high-salinity, low-silica Upper North Atlantic Deep Water at the equator; (9) a core of the high-oxygen, low-nutrient Lower North Atlantic Deep Water pressed against the southern flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge just south of the equator; (10) a weak minimum of salinity, and well-defined maxima of nutrients associated with the oxygen minimum that separates the Middle and Lower North Atlantic Deep Waters south of the equator; (11) a large body of nearly homogeneous water beneath the Middle North Atlantic Deep Water between 20-degrees-N and the Azores-Biscay Rise; and (12) a deep westward boundary undercurrent on the southern slope of the Rockall Plateau.

Tsuchiya, M, Talley LD.  1998.  A Pacific hydrographic section at 88 degrees W: Water-property distribution. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 103:12899-12918.   10.1029/97jc03415   AbstractWebsite

Full-depth conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD)/hydrographic measurements with high horizontal and vertical resolution were made in February-April 1993 along a line lying at a nominal longitude of 88 degrees W and extending from southern Chile (54 degrees S) to Guatemala (14 degrees N). It crossed five major deep basins (Southeast Pacific, Chile, Peru, Panama, and Guatemala basins) east of the East Pacific Rise. Vertical sections of potential temperature, salinity, potential density, oxygen, silica, phosphate, nitrate, and nitrite are presented to illustrate the structure of the entire water column. Some features of interest found in the sections are described, and an attempt is made to interpret them in terms of the isopycnal property distributions associated with the large-scale ocean circulation. These features include: various near-surface waters observed in the tropical and subtropical regions and the fronts that mark the boundaries of these waters; the possible importance of salt fingering to the downward salt transfer from the high-salinity subtropical water; a shallow thermostad (pycnostad) developed at 16 degrees-18.5 degrees C in the subtropical water; low-salinity surface water in the subantarctic zone west of southern Chile; large domains of extremely low oxygen in the subpycnocline layer on both sides of the equator and a secondary nitrite maximum associated with a nitrate minimum in these low-oxygen domains; high-salinity, low-oxygen, high-nutrient subpycnocline water that is carried poleward along the eastern boundary by the Peru-Chile Undercurrent; the Subantarctic Mode and Antarctic Intermediate waters; middepth isopycnal property extrema observed at the crest of the Sala y Gomez Ridge; influences of the North Pacific and the North Atlantic upon deep waters along the section; and the characteristics and sources of the bottom waters in the five deep basins along the section.