Publications with links

Export 4 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Asc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M [N] O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
N
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicine.  2017.  Sustaining ocean observations to understand future changes in earth’s climate. :150., Washington, DC: The National Academies Press   10.17226/24919   Abstract

The ocean is an integral component of the Earth’s climate system. It covers about 70% of the Earth’s surface and acts as its primary reservoir of heat and carbon, absorbing over 90% of the surplus heat and about 30% of the carbon dioxide associated with human activities, and receiving close to 100% of fresh water lost from land ice. With the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, notably carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion, the Earth’s climate is now changing more rapidly than at any time since the advent of human societies. Society will increasingly face complex decisions about how to mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change such as droughts, sea-level rise, ocean acidification, species loss, changes to growing seasons, and stronger and possibly more frequent storms. Observations play a foundational role in documenting the state and variability of components of the climate system and facilitating climate prediction and scenario development. Regular and consistent collection of ocean observations over decades to centuries would monitor the Earth’s main reservoirs of heat, carbon dioxide, and water and provides a critical record of long-term change and variability over multiple time scales. Sustained high-quality observations are also needed to test and improve climate models, which provide insights into the future climate system. Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth’s Climate considers processes for identifying priority ocean observations that will improve understanding of the Earth’s climate processes, and the challenges associated with sustaining these observations over long timeframes.

National Research Council(U.S.). Climate Research Committee..  1995.  Natural climate variability on decade-to-century time scales. :xiv,630p.., Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press Abstract
n/a
National Research Council(U.S.). Committee on Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean., Board. NRCPR(US).  2011.  Future science opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. :1onlineresource(xiv,195pages)., Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press AbstractWebsite

"Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean remains one of the world's last frontiers. Covering nearly 14 million km p2 s (an area approximately 1.4 times the size of the United States), Antarctica is the coldest, driest, highest, and windiest continent on Earth. While it is challenging to live and work in this extreme environment, this region offers many opportunities for scientific research. Ever since the first humans set foot on Antarctica a little more than a century ago, the discoveries made there have advanced our scientific knowledge of the region, the world, and the Universe--but there is still much more to learn. However, conducting scientific research in the harsh environmental conditions of Antarctica is profoundly challenging. Substantial resources are needed to establish and maintain the infrastructure needed to provide heat, light, transportation, and drinking water, while at the same time minimizing pollution of the environment and ensuring the safety of researchers. Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean suggests actions for the United States to achieve success for the next generation of Antarctic and Southern Ocean science. The report highlights important areas of research by encapsulating each into a single, overarching question. The questions fall into two broad themes: (1) those related to global change, and (2) those related to fundamental discoveries. In addition, the report identified key science questions that will drive research in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in coming decades, and highlighted opportunities to be leveraged to sustain and improve the U.S. research efforts in the region."--Publisher's description.

National Research Council(U.S.). Panel on Climate Change Feedbacks., National Research Council(U.S.). Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate..  2003.  Understanding climate change feedbacks. :xiv,152p.ill.23cm.., Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, Abstract
n/a