Publications

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2010
Stramma, L, Schmidtko S, Levin LA, Johnson GC.  2010.  Ocean oxygen minima expansions and their biological impacts. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 57:587-595.   10.1016/j.dsr.2010.01.005   AbstractWebsite

Climate models with biogeochemical components predict declines in oceanic dissolved oxygen with global warming. In coastal regimes oxygen deficits represent acute ecosystem perturbations Here, we estimate dissolved oxygen differences across the global tropical and subtropical oceans within the oxygen minimum zone (200-700-dbar depth) between 1960-1974 (an early period with reliable data) and 1990-2008 (a recent period capturing ocean response to planetary warming) In most regions of the tropical Pacific. Atlantic, and Indian Oceans the oxygen content in the 200-700-dbar layer has declined. Furthermore, at 200 dbar, the area with O(2) < 70 mu mol kg(-1) where some large mobile macro-organisms are unable to abide, has increased by 4.5 million km(2) The tropical low oxygen zones have expanded horizontally and vertically Subsurface oxygen has decreased adjacent to most continental shelves However, oxygen has increased in sonic regions in the subtropical gyres at the depths analyzed According to literature discussed below, fishing pressure is strong in the open ocean, which may make it difficult to isolate the impact of declining oxygen on fisheries At shallower depths we predict habitat compression will occur for hypoxia-intolerant taxa, with eventual loss of biodiversity. Should past trends in observed oxygen differences continue into the future, shifts in animal distributions and changes in ecosystem structure could accelerate (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

2002
Davis, JLD, Levin LA.  2002.  Importance of pre-recruitment life-history stages to population dynamics of the woolly sculpin Clinocottus analis. Marine Ecology-Progress Series. 234:229-246.   10.3354/meps234229   AbstractWebsite

The relative influence of pre- versus post-recruitment life-history events on population size has been the subject of much recent debate. In the marine realm, much work has focused on intertidal invertebrates and on tropical reef fishes, with mixed results. We addressed this problem for a temperate intertidal fish, Clinocottus analis. Our main goal was to determine which life-history stage was most responsible for temporal changes in population size from 1996 to 2000 at 2 sites in San Diego, California, both seasonally and during the 1997 to 1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. We approached the problem using cohort analysis and matrix population modeling. Recruitment pulses were evident in population size structure for up to a year, unobscured by post-recruitment mortality, which was not density-dependent, Recruitment was not correlated to spawning adult biomass of 3 mo earlier, suggesting that egg, larval, or early post-settlement processes during those 3 mo determined the magnitude of recruitment, and ultimately, population size. Stage-structured population projection matrices were constructed to compare population growth rates and sensitivities among seasons and between climate periods (El Nino and non-El Nino), Elasticity (prospective) and decomposition (retrospective) analyses of these matrices indicated that the vital rates to which population growth rate (lambda) was theoretically most sensitive were not necessarily those responsible for observed temporal differences in lambda. Although, was most sensitive to juvenile growth and adult survivorship, fertility (which in this model included fecundity and egg, larval, and early post-settlement survivorship), in addition to juvenile growth, drove observed seasonal differences in lambda C. andlis population size decreased during the 1997 to 1998 El Nino event due to a decrease in recruitment, a decrease in batch fecundity (hydrated eggs per female) and, at 1 site, changes in juvenile survivorship, Results of the study emphasize the power of early life-history events to structure C. analis populations on both seasonal and longer timescales.

1998
Rice, SA, Levin LA.  1998.  Streblospio gynobranchiata, a new spionid polychaete species (Annelida : Polychaeta) from Florida and the Gulf of Mexico with an analysis of phylogenetic relationships within the genus Streblospio. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. 111:694-707. AbstractWebsite

Streblospio gynobranchiata, a new species of spionid polychaete, is described from Florida and the Gulf of Mexico. This species is distinguished by the presence of strap-like branchiae, beneath which larvae are brooded, in the genital body region of the females. Data from experimental crosses conducted in the laboratory are presented that indicate incipient reproductive isolation between S. gynobranchiata from Florida and S. benedicti from North Carolina and California. The spermatophores produced by males of S. gynobranchiata and S. benedicti are described for the first time. Morphological, developmental, and reproductive characteristics are used in combination to construct a cladogram that suggests possible phylogenetic relationships between known species in the genus Streblospio.

1991
Levin, LA, Zhu J, Creed E.  1991.  The genetic basis of life history characters in a polychaete exhibiting planktotrophy and lecithotrophy. Evolution. 45:380-397.   10.2307/2409672   AbstractWebsite

The polychaete Streblospio benedicti is unusual in that several field populations consist of individuals that exhibit either planktotrophic or lecithotrophic larval development. Planktotrophy in this species involves production of many small ova that develop into feeding larvae with a two- to three-week planktonic period. Lecithotrophy involves production of fewer, larger ova that develop into nonfeeding larvae that are brooded longer and have a brief planktonic stage. Reciprocal matings were performed to investigate genetic variance components and the correlation structure of life-history traits associated with planktotrophy and lecithotrophy. Our objective was to better understand persistence of this developmental dichotomy in Streblospio benedicti, and among marine invertebrates in general. Substantial additive genetic variation (75-98% of total) was detected for the following characters at first reproduction: female length; position of the first gametogenic setiger and first brood pouch; ovum diameter; three traits related to fecundity (numbers of ova per ovary, larvae per brood pouch, and larvae per brood); median larval planktonic period and the presence of larval swimming setae; but not for total number of brood pouches; larval length; larval feeding; and larval survivorship. Based on the unusual geographic distribution of development modes in this species, we hypothesize that the developmental traits have evolved in allopatry and have only recently come into contact in North Carolina. The high additive contribution to variance observed for many traits may be inflated due to (a) nonrandom breeding in nature, and (b) examination of only one component of an age-structured population at one time. Nuclear interaction variance and maternal variance accounted for 84% of the total variation in larval survivorship. This observation supports other empirical studies and theoretical predictions that nonadditive components of variance will increase in importance in individual traits that are most closely tied to fitness. A network of life-history trait correlations was observed that defines distinct planktotrophic and lecithotrophic trait complexes. Negative genetic correlations were present between fecundity and egg size, between fecundity and position of the first gametes, and between larval survivorship and median planktonic period. Positive genetic correlations were detected between fecundity and female size at first reproduction and between planktonic period and the presence of swimming setae. Intergenerational product-moment correlations were negative for larval length and fecundity, planktonic period and egg size, female size and larval survivorship, and fecundity and larval survivorship. If the genetic correlation structure observed in the laboratory persists in the field, it may constrain responses of individual characters to directional selection, and indirectly perpetuate the dichotomies associated with planktotrophy and lecithotrophy.