Vertical zonation patterns of scavenging amphipods from the Hadal zone of the Tonga and Kermadec Trenches

Citation:
Blankenship, LE, Yayanos AA, Cadien DB, Levin LA.  2006.  Vertical zonation patterns of scavenging amphipods from the Hadal zone of the Tonga and Kermadec Trenches. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 53:48-61.

Date Published:

Jan

Keywords:

biology, central north pacific, continental-slope, deep-sea amphipods, eurythenes-gryllus, genus gammarus, habitat, Hadal, life-cycle characteristics, Lysianassoidea, partitioning, population-structure, reproduction, scavengers, trench, ultra-abyssal fauna, zonation

Abstract:

Deep-sea trenches present an ideal system in which to study vertical zonation, though the difficulties inherent in studying these great depths have thus far deterred such research. Here, we present the first account of the structure and vertical zonation of the scavenging guild residing in the hadal habitat of the Tonga and Kermadec Trenches (SW Pacific Ocean). Four species of scavenging amphipod (Eurythenes gryllus, Scopelocheirus schellenbergi, Hirondellea dubia, and Uristes sp. nov.) were captured with baited free-vehicle traps set 1 m above the seafloor and deployed to bottom depths between 5155 and 10,787 m. Each species occupied a distinct vertical zone of 3.5 km or less, and the scavenging amphipod assemblage vertically partitioned the hadal zone. Scavenging amphipod diversity and evenness sharply declined below 9 km. For S. schellenbergi and H. dubia, population structure was stratified ontogenetically. Early instars appeared to reside exclusively in the shallower depths of each species' vertical zone, and were functionally missing from the median and deeper regions. We captured brooding Uristes sp. nov. females, documenting the first bait-attendance event of brooding amphipods in the hadal zone. Separation of habitat in conjunction with deviations in reproductive traits, behaviors, and nutritional strategies may facilitate the coexistence of these four related species in this harsh and confining habitat. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Notes:

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DOI:

10.1016/j.dsr.2005.09.006