Deep Ocean Observing Strategy

A need for sustained global deep ocean observations

The deep ocean is growing in importance on multiple fronts: as a mitigator and indicator of climate change and as a source of food, energy, and raw materials. These services create a growing imperative to generate the data required to advance our understanding of, and maintain the functioning and services of the deep ocean. Critical to this effort is the challenge of sustainably observing and managing the deep ocean. With diverse deep-ocean observing activities emerging across multiple jurisdictions, scientific disciplines and technologies, a global initiative is needed to generate an observing network that will facilitate and unify these efforts.

 The Deep Ocean Observing Strategy (DOOS) is a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Project focused on the creation and implementation a collective statement of requirements and an initial strategy for sustained global deep-ocean observations for the next 10-50 years. The long-term requirements and strategy will be developed with consideration to all Essential Ocean Variables, regions, and technologies to ensure high impact, feasibility, and GOOS fit-for-purpose actions.

Membership

The DOOS Steering Committee will provide oversight and work with the DOOS community to conduct a series of activities, which will include the outlining of specifications for new deep-ocean EOVs, an audit of the availability and accessibility of data, and to draft a DOOS Science and Implementation Guide.

DOOS Leadership

Lisa Levin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography [Co-chair]

Patrick Heimbach, University of Texas, Austin [Co-chair]

Henry Ruhl, National Oceanography Centre [Co-chair]

Andrea McCurdy, UCAR [Project Manager]

 

For more information, including an inventory of deep-ocean observing and the DOOS scoping workshop report please visit us at: www.deepoceanobserving.org

 

Partners

DOOS works in close cooperation with the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) framework of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and the Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative (www.dosi-project.org)

DOOS hopes to improve understanding of the state of the deep ocean with respect to baseline conditions, response to climate variability and response to human disturbance. DOOS will identify approaches to address key scientific questions and societal needs, design and evaluate appropriate observing systems, pilot projects, and process studies

Strategic Objectives:

  • Build an understanding of what is most important to observe
  • Provide a hub for integration opportunities
  • Coordinate observations to improve efficiency, standards, and best practices
  • Develop deep observing requirements
  • Build readiness in observing technology and techniques
  • Foster availability, discoverability, and usability of deep ocean data
  • Create a community science implementation plan

 Key Science and Integration Areas:

  • Physics and Climate:
    • Energy balance and freshwater cycle
    • Deep global overturning circulation
    • Ocean-Atmosphere-Ice processes
    • Severe events
  • Biogeochemistry:
    • Dissolved and particulate organic matter/suspended particulates
    • Transient Tracers
    • N2O and ocean color
  • Biology and Ecosystems:
    • Strategic exploration of deep sea life and habitat
    • Ecosystem function and services
    • Impacts of climate change and direct human disturbance

Our interactive map online provide a glimpse of deep-ocean observation efforts being conducted across the globe and at different depths.

DOOS Activities and Next Steps 

  • Planning
    • Engage the Earth Science community​[LL2] 
    • Finalize Deep EOVs – update specs and complete, Examine past EOV Coverage​
    • Promote existing deep-ocean observing programs and develop an integrated network
    • Identify gaps and emerging systems – develop task teams to address these​
    • Generate pilot studies (that integrate key questions)​
    • Develop Science Guidance and Implementation Plan​
    • Develop Technology Roadmap for deep observing, include tech transfer and capacity building​
  • Data
    • Form a deep data team,
    • Complete the ocean inventory
    • Conduct a deep data audit​
    • Collate and post best practices for deep observing​
  • Communicate and Coordinate
    • Promote existing deep observing opportunities to the science community​
    • Raise awareness of deep observing importance – public and policy makers​
    • Identify linkages and conduct events with stakeholders (industry, intergovernmental agencies)​
    • Build partnerships to encourage use of deep observing data, incl. intergovernmental organizations (DOSI, IPBES, INDEEP, IPCC, WCRP, NGOs.

Deep ocean observation is a science and technology challenge addressing the grand societal issues of climate change mitigation and adaptation, ecosystem exploration, sustainable management and conservation. The Deep Ocean Observing Strategy (DOOS) is a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Project focused on the creation and implementation a collective statement of requirements and an initial strategy for sustained global deep-ocean observations for the next 10-50 years. The long-term requirements and strategy will be developed with consideration to all Essential Ocean Variables, regions, and technologies to ensure high impact, feasibility, and GOOS fit-for-purpose actions.