Publications

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2015
Bundy, RM, Abdulla HAN, Hatcher PG, Biller DV, Buck KN, Barbeau KA.  2015.  Iron-binding ligands and humic substances in the San Francisco Bay estuary and estuarine-influenced shelf regions of coastal California. Marine Chemistry. 173:183-194.   10.1016/j.marchem.2014.11.005   AbstractWebsite

Dissolved iron (dFe) and organic dFe-binding ligands were determined in San Francisco Bay, California by competitive ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV) along a salinity gradient from the freshwater endmember of the Sacramento River (salinity <2) to the mouth of the estuary (salinity >26). A range of dFe-binding ligand classes was simultaneously determined using multiple analytical window analysis, involving titrations with multiple concentrations of the added ligand,salicylaldoxime. The highest dFe and ligand concentrations were determined in the low salinity end of the estuary, with dFe equal to 131.5 nmol L-1 and strong ligand (log K-Fel, Fe'(cond) >= 12.0) concentrations equal to 139.5 nmol L-1. The weakest ligands (log K-Fel, Fe'(cond) < 10.0) were always in excess of dFe in low salinity waters, but were rapidly flocculated within the estuary and were not detected at salinities greater than 7. The strongest ligands (log K-Fel, Fe'(cond) > 11.0) were tightly coupled to dFe throughout the estuary, with average excess ligand concentrations ([L]-[dFe]) equal to 0.5 nmol L-1. Humic-like substances analyzed via both CLE-ACSV and proton nuclear magnetic resonance in several samples were found to be a significant portion of the dFe-binding ligand pool in San Francisco Bay, with concentrations ranging from 559.5 mu g L-1 to 67.5 mu g L-1 in the lowest and highest salinity samples, respectively. DFe-binding ligands and humic-like substances were also found in benthic boundary layer samples taken from the shelf near the mouths of San Francisco Bay and Eel River, suggesting estuaries are an important source of dFe-binding ligands to California coastal shelf waters. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2006
Barbeau, K.  2006.  Photochemistry of organic iron(III) complexing ligands in oceanic systems. Photochemistry and Photobiology. 82:1505-1516.   10.1562/2006-06-16-ir-935   AbstractWebsite

Iron is a limiting nutrient for primary production in marine systems, and photochemical processes play a significant role in the upper ocean biogeochemical cycling of this key element. In recent years, progress has been made toward understanding the role of biologically produced organic ligands in controlling the speciation and photochemical redox cycling of iron in ocean surface waters. Most (> 99%) of the dissolved iron in seawater is now known to be associated with strong organic ligands. New data concerning the structure and photochemical reactivity of strong Fe(III) binding ligands (siderophores) produced by pelagic marine bacteria suggest that direct photolysis via ligand-to-metal charge transfer reactions may be an important mechanism for the production of reduced, biologically available iron (Fe[II]) in surface waters. Questions remain, however, about the importance of these processes relative to secondary photochemical reactions with photochemically produced radical species, such as superoxide (O-2(-))The mechanism of superoxide-mediated reduction of Fe(III) in the presence of strong Fe(III) organic ligands is also open to debate. This review highlights recent findings, including both model ligand studies and experimental/observational studies of the natural seawater ligand pool.