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2003
Barbeau, K, Rue EL, Trick CG, Bruland KT, Butler A.  2003.  Photochemical reactivity of siderophores produced by marine heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria based on characteristic Fe(III) binding groups. Limnology and Oceanography. 48:1069-1078. AbstractWebsite

Siderophores, high-affinity Fe(III) ligands produced by microorganisms to facilitate iron acquisition, might contribute significantly to dissolved Fe(III) complexation in ocean surface waters. In previous work, we demonstrated the photoreactivity of the ferric ion complexes of several alpha-hydroxy carboxylic acid-containing siderophores produced by heterotrophic marine bacteria. Here, we expand on our earlier studies and detail the photoreactivity of additional siderophores produced by both heterotrophic marine bacteria and marine cyanobacteria, making comparisons to synthetic and terrestrial siderophores that lack the alpha-hydroxy carboxylate group. Our results suggest that, in addition to secondary photochemical reaction pathways involving reactive oxygen species, direct photolysis of Fe(III)-siderophore complexes might be a significant source of Fe(II) and reactive Fe(III) in ocean surface waters. Our findings further indicate that the photoreactivity of siderophores is primarily determined by the chemical structure of the Fe(III) binding groups that they possess-hydroxamate, catecholate, or alpha-hydroxy carboxylate moieties. Hydroxamate groups are photochemically resistant regardless of Fe(III) complexation. Catecholates, in contrast, are susceptible to photooxidation in the uncomplexed form but stabilized against photooxidation when ferrated. alpha-Hydroxy carboxylate groups are stable as the uncomplexed acid, but when coordinated to Fe(III), these moieties undergo light-induced ligand oxidation and reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). These photochemical properties appear to determine the reactivity and fate of Fe(III)-binding siderophores in ocean surface waters, which in turn might significantly influence the biogeochemical cycling of iron.

2007
Hopkinson, BM, Barbeau KA.  2007.  Organic and redox speciation of iron in the eastern tropical North Pacific suboxic zone. Marine Chemistry. 106:2-17.   10.1016/j.marchem.2006.02.008   AbstractWebsite

The organic and redox speciation of iron was examined in the strongly layered upper water column of the eastern tropical North Pacific, including oxic and sub oxic waters, in a region 100- 1300 km offshore. Suboxic conditions ([O-2] < 5 mu M) were found to affect the organic speciation of iron, and reduced dissolved iron, Fc(II), was present in the suboxic zone, but conditions were not sufficiently reducing to convert all iron to Fe(II). Dissolved iron concentrations in the suboxic zone were similar to concentrations found in oxic regions. Using a competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV) method, natural ligands were found to have distinct characteristics in the oxic and suboxic waters with stronger ligands found in the suboxic zone. It is unusual to find stronger ligands below the euphotic zone, but their strength, logK(Fe'L) = 12.1-12.8, is within the range determined for surface ligands in other regions. These strong ligands may be the result of the unique chemistry of the suboxic zone stabilizing reduced or labile compounds, or they may be actively produced by microbes to enhance iron uptake. No onshore-offshore trends in ligand strength or concentration were detected suggesting the ligands may result from the inherent chemistry of the suboxic zone or production from denitrifiers, rather than the resident suboxic zone population of Prochlorococcus which were more abundant nearshore. A luminol-chemiluminescence based flow injection analysis (FIA) technique capable of detecting picomolar concentrations of Fe(II) was used to assess the redox state of iron in the suboxic zone and overlying oxic waters at a station 1300 km offshore. An elevated signal equivalent to 0.12-0.15 nM Fe(II), 21-24% of dissolved iron, was found only in the suboxic waters. Oxidation kinetics suggest that this Fe(II) is most likely produced by an in-situ process, as opposed to being transported from shelf sediment. The luminol-chemiluminescence Fe(II) method was systematically tested for inferences from reduced species potentially present in the suboxic zone to validate our Fe(II) results. Several species, V(IV) and V(111), produced significant signals, but considerations of the reducing state of the suboxic zone make it unlikely that reduced V is present. With additional information on the identity of the suboxic zone species provided by analysis of signal decay rate, it was determined that Fe(II) was the most reasonable source of the signal, and at minimum the chemiluminescence data allows us to set limits on the Fe(II) concentration in the offshore suboxic water column. (C) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2012
King, AL, Buck KN, Barbeau KA.  2012.  Quasi-Lagrangian drifter studies of iron speciation and cycling off Point Conception, California. Marine Chemistry. 128:1-12.   10.1016/j.marchem.2011.11.001   AbstractWebsite

The distribution and speciation of dissolved Fe (dFe) were measured during four quasi-Lagrangian drogued drifter studies (similar to 4 d duration each) that were conducted in the southern California Current System in May 2006 and April 2007. Three of the four drifter studies were within the coastal upwelling regime and one drifter study was in a warm-core anticyclonic eddy. Incubation bottle experiments were also conducted to determine the degree of phytoplankton Fe limitation and to assess changes in the concentration of Fe-binding ligands. In the coastal upwelling drifter studies, in situ dFe (1.4-1.8 nM) and macronutrients were initially high and declined over time. Fe addition incubation experiments indicated that the phytoplankton community was not Fe limited at the beginning of the coastal upwelling drifter experiments (when mu M nitrate:nM dFe ratios were similar to 7-8). By the end of two of the three drifter studies (when mu M nitrate:nM dFe ratios were similar to 12-19), Fe addition resulted in larger nitrate and silicic acid drawdown, and larger accumulations in chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, and diatom and dinoflagellate-specific carotenoid pigments. Fe speciation was measured in situ in three of the four drifter studies with stronger L-1-type ligands found to be present in excess of dFe in all samples. In Fe speciation incubation experiments. L-1-type ligand production was observed in conjunction with phytoplankton growth under Fe-limiting conditions. The results presented here support and add a quasi-Lagrangian perspective to previous observations of dFe and macronutrient cycling over space and time within the California coastal upwelling regime, including Fe limitation within the phytoplankton community in this region and the biological production of Fe-binding ligands concomitant with Fe limitation. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.