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Journal Article
Stukel, MR, Kelly TB, Aluwihare LI, Barbeau KA, Goericke R, Krause JW, Landry MR, Ohman MD.  2019.  The Carbon:(234)Thorium ratios of sinking particles in the California current ecosystem 1: relationships with plankton ecosystem dynamics. Marine Chemistry. 212:1-15.   10.1016/j.marchem.2019.01.003   AbstractWebsite

We investigated variability in the C:Th-234 ratio of sinking particles and its relationship to changing water column characteristics and plankton ecological dynamics during 29 Lagrangian experiments conducted on six cruises of the California Current Ecosystem Long-Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) Program. C:Th-234 ratios of sinking particles collected by a surface-tethered sediment trap ((CThST)-Th-:234) varied from 2.3 to 20.5 mu mol C dpm(-1) over a depth range of 47-150 m. C:Th-234(ST) was significantly greater (by a factor of 1.8) than C:Th-234 ratios of suspended > 51-mu m particles collected in the same water parcels with in situ pumps. C:Th-234 ratios of large (> 200-mu m) sinking particles also exceeded those of smaller sinking particles. C:Th-234(ST) decreased with depth from the base of the euphotic zone through the upper twilight zone. C:Th-234(ST) was positively correlated with several indices of ecosystem productivity including particulate organic carbon (POC) and chlorophyll (Chl) concentrations, mesozooplankton biomass, and the fraction of Chl > 20-mu m. Principal component analysis and multiple linear regression suggested that decaying phytoplankton blooms exhibited higher C:Th-234(ST) than actively growing blooms at similar biomass levels. C:Th-234(ST) was positively correlated with indices of the fractional contribution of fecal pellets in sediment traps when the proportion of fecal pellets was low in the traps, likely because of a correlation between mesozooplankton biomass and other indices of ecosystem productivity. However, when fecal pellets were a more important component of sinking material, C:Th-234(ST) decreased with increasing fecal pellet content. C:Th-234(ST) was also positively correlated with the Si:C ratio of sinking particles. Across the dataset (and across depths) a strong correlation was found between C:Th-234(ST) and the ratio of vertically-integrated POC to vertically-integrated total water column Th-234 (C-v:Th-234(tot)). A mechanistic one-layer, two-box model of thorium sorption and desorption was invoked to explain this correlation. Two empirical models (one using C-v:Th-234(tot); one using depth and vertically-integrated Chl) were developed to predict C:Th-234 ratios in this coastal upwelling biome. The former regression (log(10)(C:Th-234(ST)) = 0.43 x log(10)(C-v:Th-234(tot)) + 0.53) was found to also be a reasonable predictor for C:Th-234(ST) from diverse regions including the Southern Ocean, Sargasso Sea, Subarctic North Pacific, and Eastern Tropical North Pacific.

Barbeau, K, Kujawinski EB, Moffett JW.  2001.  Remineralization and recycling of iron, thorium and organic carbon by heterotrophic marine protists in culture. Aquatic Microbial Ecology. 24:69-81.   10.3354/ame024069   AbstractWebsite

To characterize trace metal cycling in marine systems as mediated by heterotrophic protists, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments in 2-organism model systems consisting of bacteria and protistan grazers. Trace metal isotopes (Fe-59 and Th-234),C-14, and bulk organic carbon measurements were used to follow the chemical transformation of bacterial carbon and associated trace metals by several different grazer species. Results indicate that grazers were able to cause repartitioning of Th and regeneration of Fe from bacterial prey into the dissolved phase (<0.2 m), even in particle-rich laboratory cultures. For both Th and Fe, protist grazing led to the formation of relatively stable dissolved and colloidal metal-organic species. Metal/carbon ratios of the particle pool in some model systems with grazers were significantly altered, indicating a decoupling of trace metal and organic carbon cycling through the grazing process. Different protist species exhibited substantial variation (up to a factor of 10) in their ability to quantitatively remobilize trace metals from bacterial prey. The implications of these findings for trace metal cycling in marine systems are discussed.