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2010
Anderson, LG, Tanhua T, Bjork G, Hjalmarsson S, Jones EP, Jutterstrom S, Rudels B, Swift JH, Wahlstom I.  2010.  Arctic ocean shelf-basin interaction: An active continental shelf CO2 pump and its impact on the degree of calcium carbonate solubility. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 57:869-879.   10.1016/j.dsr.2010.03.012   AbstractWebsite

The Arctic Ocean has wide shelf areas with extensive biological activity including a high primary productivity and an active microbial loop within the surface sediment. This in combination with brine production during sea ice formation result in the decay products exiting from the shelf into the deep basin typically at a depth of about 150 m and over a wide salinity range centered around S similar to 33. We present data from the Beringia cruise in 2005 along a section in the Canada Basin from the continental margin north of Alaska towards the north and from the International Siberian Shelf Study in 2008 (ISSS-08) to illustrate the impact of these processes. The water rich in decay products, nutrients and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), exits the shelf not only from the Chukchi Sea, as has been shown earlier, but also from the East Siberian Sea. The excess of DIC found in the Canada Basin in a depth range of about 50-250 m amounts to 90 +/- 40 g C m(-2). If this excess is integrated over the whole Canadian Basin the excess equals 320 +/- 140 x 10(12) g C. The high DIC concentration layer also has low pH and consequently a low degree of calcium carbonate saturation, with minimum aragonite values of 60% saturation and calcite values just below saturation. The mean age of the waters in the top 300 m was calculated using the transit time distribution method. By applying a future exponential increase of atmospheric CO2 the invasion of anthropogenic carbon into these waters will result in an under-saturated surface water with respect to aragonite by the year 2050, even without any freshening caused by melting sea ice or increased river discharge. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2009
Codispoti, LA, Flagg CN, Swift JH.  2009.  Hydrographic conditions during the 2004 SBI process experiments. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 56:1144-1163.   10.1016/j.dsr2.2008.10.013   AbstractWebsite

Western Arctic Shelf-Basin Interactions (SBI) process experiment cruises were conducted during spring and summer in 2002 and 2004. A comparison of the 2004 data with the results from 2002 reveals several similarities but also some distinct differences. Similarities included the following: (1) Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) (ammonium+nitrate+nitrite) limited phytoplankton growth in both years, suggesting that the fixed-N transport through Bering Strait is a major control on biological productivity. (2) The head of Barrow Canyon was a region of enhanced biological production. (3) Plume-like nutrient maxima and N** minima (a signal of sedimentary denitrification) extending from the shelf into the interior were common except at our easternmost section where the nearshore end of these features intersected the slope. (4) Particularly during summer, oxygen supersaturations were common in or just above the shallow nitracline. (5) Surface waters at our deepest stations were already depleted in nitrate, ammonium and urea during our springtime observations. A major difference between the 2 years was the greater influence of warm, relatively low-nutrient Alaska Coastal Water (ACW) during 2004 entering the region via Bering Strait. This increased inflow of ACW may have reduced photic zone nutrient concentrations. The differences in water temperature and nutrients were most pronounced in the upper similar to 100 db, and the increased influence of warm water in 2004 relative to 2002 was most evident in our East Barrow (EB) section. Although the EB data were collected on essentially the same year-days (29 July-4 August 2002 vs. 29 July-6 August 2004), the surface layers were up to 5 degrees warmer in 2004. While the stronger inflow of ACW in 2004 may have reduced the autochthonous nutrient supply, rates of primary production, bacterial production, and particulate organic carbon export were higher in 2004. This conundrum might be explained by differences in the availability of light. Although, springtime ice thicknesses were greater in 2004 than in 2002, snow cover was significantly less and may have more than compensated for the modest differences in ice thickness vis a vis light penetration. In addition, there was a rapid and extensive retreat of the ice cover in summer 2004. Increased light penetration in 2004 may have allowed phytoplankton to increase utilization of nutrients in the shallow nitracline. In addition, more light combined with warmer temperatures could enhance that fraction of primary production supported by nutrient recycling. Enhanced subsurface primary production during summer 2004 is suggested not only by the results of incubation experiments but by more extreme dissolved oxygen supersaturations in the vicinity of the nitracline. We cannot, however, ignore aliasing that might arise from somewhat different station distributions and timing. It is also possible that the rapid ice retreat and warmer temperatures lead to an acceleration in the seasonal progression of biological processes such that the summer 2004 SBI Process Cruise (HLY 04-03) experiment was observing a state that might have existed a few weeks after completion of the 2002 summer cruise (HLY 02-03). Despite these complications, there is little doubt that biological conditions at the ensemble of hydrographic stations occupied in 2004 during the SBI Process Cruises differed significantly from those at the stations occupied in 2002. (c) 2008 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

2008
Jones, EP, Anderson LG, Jutterstrom S, Swift JH.  2008.  Sources and distribution of fresh water in the East Greenland Current. Progress in Oceanography. 78:37-44.   10.1016/j.pocean.2007.06.003   AbstractWebsite

Fresh water flowing from the Arctic Ocean via the East Greenland Current influences deep water formation in the Nordic Seas as well as the salinity of the surface and deep waters flowing from there. This fresh water has three sources: Pacific water (relatively fresh cf. Atlantic water), river runoff, and sea ice meltwater. To determine the relative amounts of the three sources of fresh water, in May 2002 we collected water samples across the East Greenland Current in sections from 81.5 degrees N to the Irminger Sea south of Denmark Strait. We used nitrate-phosphate relationships to distinguish Pacific waters from Atlantic waters, salinity to obtain the sum of sea ice melt water and river runoff water, and total alkalinity to distinguish the latter. River runoff contributed the largest part of the total fresh water component, in some regions with some inventories exceeding 12 m. Pacific fresh water (Pacific source water S similar to 32 cf Atlantic source water S similar to 34.9) typically provided about 1/3 of the river runoff contribution. Sea ice meltwater was very nearly non-existent in the surface waters of all sections, likely at least in part as a result of the samples being collected before the onset of the melt season. The fresh water from the Arctic Ocean was strongly confined to near the Greenland coast. We thus conjecture that the main source of fresh water from the Arctic Ocean most strongly impacting deep convection in the Nordic Seas would be sea ice as opposed to fresh water in the liquid phase, i.e., river runoff, Pacific fresh water, and sea ice meltwater. Crown Copyright (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Marnela, M, Rudels B, Olsson KA, Anderson LG, Jeansson E, Torres DJ, Messias MJ, Swift JH, Watson AJ.  2008.  Transports of Nordic Seas water masses and excess SF6 through Fram Strait to the Arctic Ocean. Progress in Oceanography. 78:1-11.   10.1016/j.pocean.2007.06.004   AbstractWebsite

To determine the exchanges between the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait is one of the most important aspects, and one of the major challenges, in describing the circulation in the Arctic Mediterranean Sea. Especially the northward transport of Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW) from the Nordic Seas into the Arctic Ocean is little known. In the two-ship study of the circulation in the Nordic Seas, Arctic Ocean - 2002, the Swedish icebreaker Oden operated in the ice-covered areas in and north of Fram Strait and in the western margins of Greenland and Iceland seas, while RV Knorr of Woods Hole worked in the ice free part of the Nordic Seas. Here two hydrographic sections obtained by Oden, augmented by tracer and velocity measurements with Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (LADCP), are examined. The first section, reaching from the Svalbard shelf across the Yermak Plateau, covers the region north of Svalbard where inflow to the Arctic Ocean takes place. The second, western, section spans the outflow area extending from west of the Yermak Plateau onto the Greenland shelf. Geostrophic and LADCP derived velocities are both used to estimate the exchanges of water masses between the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean. The geostrophic computations indicate a total flow of 3.6 Sv entering the Arctic on the eastern section. The southward flow on the western section is found to be 5.1 Sv. The total inflow to the Arctic Ocean obtained using the LADCP derived velocities is much larger, 13.6 Sv, and the southward transport on the western section is 13.7 Sv, equal to the northward transport north of Svalbard. Sulphur hexafluoricle (SF(6)) originating from a tracer release experiment in the Greenland Sea in 1996 has become a marker for the circulation of AIW. From the geostrophic velocities we obtain 0.5 Sv and from the LADCP derived velocities 2.8 Sv of AIW flowing into the Arctic. The annual transport of SF(6) into the Arctic Ocean derived from geostrophy is 5 kg/year, which is of the same magnitude as the observed total annual transport into the North Atlantic, while the LADCP measurements (19 kg/year) imply that it is substantially larger. Little SF(6) was found on the western section, confirming the dominance of the Arctic Ocean water masses and indicating that the major recirculation in Fram Strait takes place farther to the south. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Jones, EP, Anderson LG, Jutterstrom S, Mintrop L, Swift JH.  2008.  Pacific freshwater, river water and sea ice meltwater across Arctic Ocean basins: Results from the 2005 Beringia Expedition. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 113   10.1029/2007jc004124   AbstractWebsite

Pacific water, sea ice meltwater, and river water are the primary sources of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean. We have determined their relative fractions on a transect across the Arctic Ocean Section 2005 Expedition onboard IB Oden, which took place from 21 August to 23 September 2005. The transect began north of Alaska, continued through the central Canada Basin to the Alpha Ridge and into the Makarov Basin, and ended in Amundsen Basin. Pacific freshwater and river water were the major sources of freshwater throughout the central Canada Basin and into Makarov Basin, with river water fractions sometimes considerably higher than Pacific water in the top similar to 50 m. Pacific freshwater extended to depths of about 200 m. Pacific water found over the Alpha Ridge and in the Amundsen Basin is suggested to have been transported there in the Transpolar Drift. The inventories of Pacific freshwater and river water were roughly constant along the section through most of the Canada and Makarov basins. River water fractions were greater than those of Pacific freshwater in the Amundsen Basin. Sea ice meltwater fractions were negative (reflecting net ice formation) or near zero throughout most of the section. A comparison of freshwater inventories with those at stations occupied during expeditions in 1991, 1994, and 1996 indicated an increase in river water inventories in the Makarov and Amundsen basins on the Eurasian side of the Arctic Ocean.

2005
Falkner, KK, Steele M, Woodgate RA, Swift JH, Aagaard K, Morison J.  2005.  Dissolved oxygen extrema in the Arctic Ocean halocline from the North Pole to the Lincoln Sea. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 52:1138-1154.   10.1016/j.dsr.2005.01.007   AbstractWebsite

Dissolved oxygen (02) profiling by new generation sensors was conducted in the Arctic Ocean via aircraft during May 2003 as part of the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) and Freshwater Switchyard (SWYD) projects. At stations extending from the North Pole to the shelf off Ellesmere Island, such profiles display what appear to be various 02 maxima (with concentrations 70% of saturation or less) over depths of 70-110 m in the halocline, corresponding to salinity and temperature ranges of 33.3-33.9 and -1.7 to -1.5 degrees C. The features appear to be widely distributed: Similar features based on bottle data were recently reported for a subset of the 1997-1998 SHEBA stations in the southern Canada Basin and in recent Beaufort Sea sensor profiles. Oxygen sensor data from August 2002 Chukchi Borderlands (CBC) and 1994 Arctic Ocean Section (AOS) projects suggest that such features arise from interleaving of shelf-derived, O(2)-depleted waters. This generates apparent oxygen maxima in Arctic Basin profiles that would otherwise trend more smoothly from near-saturation at the surface to lower concentrations at depth. For example, in the Eurasian Basin, relatively low O(2) concentrations are observed at salinities of about 34.2 and 34.7. The less saline variant is identified as part of the lower halocline, a layer originally identified by a Eurasian Basin minimum in "NO," which, in the Canadian Basin, is reinforced by additional inputs. The more saline and thus denser variant appears to arise from transformations of Atlantic source waters over the Barents and/or Kara shelves. Additional low-oxygen waters are generated in the vicinity of the Chukchi Borderlands, from Pacific shelf water outflows that interleave with Eurasian waters that flow over the Lomonosov Ridge into the Makarov Basin and then into the Canada Basin. One such input is associated with the well-known silicate maximum that historically has been associated with a salinity of approximate to 33.1. Above that (32 < S < 33), there is a layer moderately elevated in temperature (summer Bering Sea water) that we show is also O(2)-depleted. We propose that these low O(2) waters influence the NPEO and SWYD profiles to varying extents in a manner reflective of the large-scale circulation. The patterns of halocline circulation we infer from the intrusive features defy a simple boundary-following cyclonic flow. These results demonstrate the value of the improved resolution made feasible with continuous O(2) Profiling. In the drive to better understand variability and change in the Arctic Ocean, deployment of appropriately calibrated CTD-O(2) packages offers the promise of important new insights into circulation and ecosystem function. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2004
McLaughlin, FA, Carmack EC, Macdonald RW, Melling H, Swift JH, Wheeler PA, Sherr BF, Sherr EB.  2004.  The joint roles of Pacific and Atlantic-origin waters in the Canada Basin, 1997-1998. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 51:107-128.   10.1016/j.dsr.2003.09.010   AbstractWebsite

Physical and geochemical data collected weekly during the year-long 2800 km drift of the CCGS des Groseilliers show that Canada Basin waters, and in particular the composition of the halocline, can no longer be viewed as laterally homogeneous and in steady state. The halocline was thinner over the Mendeleyev Abyssal Plain and northern Chukchi Plateau. Here, Pacific-origin upper and middle halocline waters occupied the upper 80m of the water column and underlying Atlantic-origin lower halocline waters were fresher, colder and much more ventilated than observed in the past. These new observations of a sub-surface oxygen maximum suggest that outflow from the East Siberian Sea now supplies the Canada Basin lower halocline. East of the Northwind Ridge the halocline was thicker and appeared relatively unchanged. Here Pacific-origin upper and middle halocline waters occupied the top 225 m and Atlantic-origin lower halocline waters were identified by an oxygen minimum. The intensity of the Pacific-origin signal, characterized by a nutrient maximum, was strongest over the Chukchi Gap-the passage between the Chukchi Shelf and Plateau-and the Northwind Abyssal Plain and identified two winter-water spreading pathways. Atlantic-origin waters as much as 0.5degreesC warmer than the historical record were observed over the Chukchi Gap and also over the northern flank of the Chukchi Plateau. These observations signaled that warm-anomaly Fram Strait Branch (FSB) waters, first observed upstream in the Nansen Basin in 1990, had arrived downstream in the Canada Basin eight years later and also indicate two routes whereby FSB waters enter the southern Canada Basin. Although samples were collected throughout one annual cycle, seasonal effects were small and confined to the upper 50 m of the water column. These data show Canada Basin waters are in transition, responding to the effects of upstream change in atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Crown Copyright (C) 2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

2003
Anderson, LG, Jones EP, Swift JH.  2003.  Export production in the central Arctic Ocean evaluated from phosphate deficits. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 108   10.1029/2001jc001057   AbstractWebsite

[1] Primary productivity in the central Arctic Ocean has recently been reported as being much higher than earlier thought. If a significant fraction of this primary production were exported from the immediate surface region, present estimates of the carbon budget for the Arctic Ocean would have to be reassessed. Using the deficit of phosphate in the central Arctic Ocean, we show that the export production is very low, on an average less than 0.5 gC m(-2) yr(-1). This is at least an order of magnitude lower than the total production as measured or estimated from oxygen data, thus indicating extensive recycling of nutrients in the upper waters of the central Arctic Ocean and very little export production.

2002
Schauer, U, Rudels B, Jones EP, Anderson LG, Muench RD, Bjork G, Swift JH, Ivanov V, Larsson AM.  2002.  Confluence and redistribution of Atlantic water in the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins. Annales Geophysicae. 20:257-273.   10.5194/angeo-20-257-2002   AbstractWebsite

The waters in the Eurasian Basin are conditioned by the confluence of the boundary flow of warm, saline Fram Strait water and cold low salinity water from the Barents Sea entering through the St. Anna Trough. Hydrographic sections obtained from RV Polarstern during the summer of 1996 (ACSYS 96) across the St. Anna Trough and the Voronin Trough in the northern Kara Sea and across the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins allow for the determination of the water mass properties of the two components and the construction of a qualitative picture of the circulation both within the Eurasian Basin and towards the Canadian Basin. At the confluence north of the Kara Sea, the Fram Strait branch is displaced from the upper to the lower slope and it forms a sharp front to the Barents Sea water at depths between 100m and greater than 1000m. This front disintegrates downstream along the basin margin and the two components are largely mixed before the boundary current reaches the Lomonosov Ridge. Away from the continental slope, the presence of interleaving structures coherent over wide distances is consistent with low lateral shear. The return flow along the Nansen Gakkel Ridge, if present at all, seems to be slow and the cold water below a deep mixed layer there indicates that the Fram Strait Atlantic water was not covered with a halocline for about a decade. Anomalous water mass properties in the interior of the Eurasian Basin can be attributed to isolated lenses rather than to baroclinic flow cores. Eddies have probably detached from the front at the confluence and migrated into the interior of the basin. One deep (2500m) lens of Canadian Basin water, with an anticyclonic eddy signature, must have spilled through a gap of the Lomonosov Ridge. During ACSYS 96, no clear fronts between Eurasian and Canadian intermediate waters, such as those observed further north in 1991 and 1994, were found at the Siberian side of the Lomonosov Ridge. This indicates that the Eurasian Basin waters enter the Canadian Basin not only along the continental slope but they may also cross the Lomonosov Ridge at other topographic irregularities. A decrease in salinity around 1000 m in depth in the Amundsen Basin probably originates from a larger input of fresh water to the Barents Sea. The inherent density changes may affect the flow towards the Canadian Basin.

1998
Jones, EP, Anderson LG, Swift JH.  1998.  Distribution of Atlantic and Pacific waters in the upper Arctic Ocean: Implications for circulation. Geophysical Research Letters. 25:765-768.   10.1029/98gl00464   AbstractWebsite

The Atlantic and Pacific oceans provide source waters for the Arctic Ocean that can be distinguished by their differing nitrate and phosphate concentration relationships. Using these relationships, we estimate the amount of Atlantic and Pacific waters in the surface layer (top 30 m) of the Arctic Ocean. Atlantic source water is dominant in most of the Eurasian Basin and is present in significant amounts in the Makarov Basin north of the East Siberian Sea. Pacific source water is dominant in most of the Canadian Basin and is present in significant amounts in the Amundsen Basin north of Greenland. We deduce circulation patterns from the distributions of Atlantic and Pacific source waters in the surface layer of the Arctic Ocean and conclude that the flow within the surface layer differs from ice drift along the North American and European boundaries of the Polar Basin.

1997
Zheng, Y, Schlosser P, Swift JH, Jones EP.  1997.  Oxygen utilization rates in the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean: implications for new production. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers. 44:1923-1943.   10.1016/s0967-0637(97)00046-0   AbstractWebsite

In situ consumption of oxygen is balanced by ventilation if the observed distribution of dissolved oxygen below the euphotic zone is in steady state. Apparent oxygen utilization rates (AOURs) can be estimated from the observed oxygen distribution if the waters of the upper layers can be dated. It has been shown previously that tritium/(3)He ages can be used, together with observed oxygen concentrations, to estimate AOURs for waters with ages of several months to several decades. This method is applied to data obtained from the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean, during the 1987 cruise of F.S. Polarstern. New production is estimated by depth integration of AOURs calculated for several isopycnals to be 19+/-5g C m(-2) year(-1) for the southern part and 3+/-2 g C m(-2) year(-1) for the northern part of the Nansen Basin section. The results are discussed and compared with previous estimates based on different methods. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Swift, JH, Jones EP, Aagaard K, Carmack EC, Hingston M, Macdonald RW, McLaughlin FA, Perkin RG.  1997.  Waters of the Makarov and Canada basins. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 44:1503-1529.   10.1016/s0967-0645(97)00055-6   AbstractWebsite

Hydrographic measurements from the 1994 Arctic Ocean Section show how the Makarov and Canada basins of the Arctic Ocean are related, and demonstrate their oceanographic connections to the Eurasian Basin. The inflow into the Makarov Basin consists largely of well-ventilated water within a broad band of densities from a boundary how over the Siberian end of the Lomonosov Ridge. The boundary flow contains a significant component of dense shelf water likely originating in the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas. Earlier ice camp data show that the Canada Basin is relatively more isolated from this ventilation source. In the Canada Basin shelf sources influenced by Bering Sea water appear to add cold waters with high silicate concentrations to the halocline and deeper. In 1994 the halocline silicate maximum over the central Makarov Basin was absent, evidence of the recent displacement of the upper (S similar to 33.1) halocline water from the Chukchi-East Siberian Sea region by water from the Eurasian Basin. Much of the Makarov Basin water in and below the halocline is in fact from the Eurasian Basin, with admixture of waters from the Canada Basin suggested by their higher silicate concentrations. Mid-depth eddies may transport anomalous properties into the central Arctic and create property gradients or fronts in mid-depth and deep waters. The complex topography of the Mendeleyev Ridge-Chukchi Plateau region also may assist spreading of water from the boundary into the interior. Atlantic layer characteristics in 1994 differed from previous general depictions. In particular the core temperatures at the Chukchi-Mendeleyev boundary were at least 0.2 degrees C warmer on average than indicated in earlier work. The recent warming at intermediate depth has resulted from inflow of Atlantic waters that have been cooled relatively little during their transit of the Norwegian Sea. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

1995
Schlosser, P, Swift JH, Lewis D, Pfirman SL.  1995.  The role of the large-scale Arctic Ocean circulation in the transport of contaminants. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 42:1341-1367.   10.1016/0967-0645(95)00045-3   AbstractWebsite

The key features of the large-scale circulation of the Arctic Ocean are reviewed based on distributions of hydrographic parameters and natural and anthropogenic trace substances. Salinity and mass balances, as well as a combination of the tracers tritium and delta(18)O, suggest a mean residence time of the shelf waters in the Siberian seas of about 3 years. Potential pathways of pollutants released to the Siberian shelf seas from the dumpsites or from river runoff are inferred from the distributions of delta(18)O and salinity. Transit times needed for dissolved contaminants to cross the central Arctic basins (several years to one or two decades in near-surface waters) and mean residence times of contaminants in the intermediate (several decades) and deep waters (several centuries) are estimated from the distribution of transient tracers (tritium and its radioactive decay product, He-3) and ''steady-state'' tracers (C-14 and Ar-39).