Publications

Export 5 results:
Sort by: Author [ Title  (Asc)] Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M [N] O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
N
Klootwijk, CT, Gee JS, Peirce JW, Smith GM.  1992.  Neogene Evolution of the Himalayan Tibetan Region - Constraints from ODP Site-758, Northern Ninetyeast Ridge - Bearing on Climatic-Change. Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology. 95:95-110.   10.1016/0031-0182(92)90167-4   AbstractWebsite

Magnetic susceptibility, remanence and lithostratigraphic profiles for the Neogene-Quaternary sequence at Site 758 (ODP Leg 121) on the northern Ninetyeast Ridge show distinct changes, dated from biostratigraphy and detailed magnetostratigraphy, at 17.5, 10.4-10.0, 8.8, 6.5, 5.4-5.1, 2.7-2.5, 1.9, and 1.2-1.1 Ma. These magnetic and lithologic changes appear to reflect changes in the supply and character of terrigenous material from the Himalayan-Tibetan region resulting from changes in gradient of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and probably the ancient Indus drainage systems. The sedimentary changes can be correlated with changes in uplift-sensitive markers such as the oceanic Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio and monsoonal induced upwelling, but not clearly so with sealevel variations. We interpret these sedimentary changes, therefore, to primarily reflect changes in the tectonic evolution of the Himalayan-Tibetan region. The changes in the distal marine sedimentary record of the northern Ninetyeast Ridge are compared with isotopic control on the timing of Himalayan-Tibetan tectonic phases and magnetostratigraphic control on their reflection in the proximal Siwalik molasse record. This comparison indicates that the distal Ninetyeast Ridge record can be used to detail and to place minimal age constraints on tectonic phases in the wider Himalayan region and on evolution of the proximal molasse sequence, with a time lag determined for the four earliest changes at less than 1 m.y. The changes at 17.5 Ma and 5.4-5.1 Ma can be interpreted in terms of the causative chain: enhanced plate motion double-line arrow pointing right uplift and sedimentation change double-line arrow pointing right climatic change, supporting arguments that the Late Cainozoic global climatic deterioration is driven by uplift of large plateaus such as the Himalayan-Tibetan region and the Western Cordillera.

Koppers, AAP, Gowen MD, Colwell LE, Gee JS, Lonsdale PF, Mahoney JJ, Duncan RA.  2011.  New Ar-40/Ar-39 age progression for the Louisville hot spot trail and implications for inter-hot spot motion. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 12   10.1029/2011gc003804   AbstractWebsite

In this study we present 42 new Ar-40/Ar-39 incremental heating age determinations that contribute to an updated age progression for the Louisville seamount trail. Louisville is the South Pacific counterpart to the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount trail, both trails representing intraplate volcanism over the same time interval (similar to 80 Ma to present) and being examples of primary hot spot lineaments. Our data provide evidence for an age-progressive trend from 71 to 21 Ma. Assuming fixed hot spots, this makes possible a direct comparison to the Hawaiian-Emperor age progression and the most recent absolute plate motion (APM) model (WK08G) of Wessel and Kroenke (2008). We observe that for the Louisville seamount trail the measured ages are systematically older relative to both the WK08G model predictions and Hawaiian seamount ages, with offsets ranging up to 6 Myr. Taking into account the uncertainty about the duration of eruption and magmatic succession at individual Louisville volcanoes, these age offsets should be considered minimum estimates, as our sampling probably tended to recover the youngest lava flows. These large deviations point to either a contribution of inter-hot spot motion between the Louisville and Hawaiian hot spots or to a more easterly location of the Louisville hot spot than the one inferred in the WK08G model. Both scenarios are investigated in this paper, whereby the more eastern hot spot location (52.0 degrees S, 134.5 degrees W versus 52.4 degrees S, 137.2 degrees W) reduces the average age offset, but still results in a relatively large maximum offset of 3.7 Myr. When comparing the new ages to the APM models (S04P, S04G) by Steinberger et al. (2004) that attempt to compensate for the motion of hot spots in the Pacific (Hawaii) or globally (Hawaii, Louisville, Reunion and Walvis), the measured and predicted ages are more in agreement, showing only a maximum offset of 2.3 Myr with respect to the S04G model. At face value these more advanced APM models, which consider both plate and hot spot motions, therefore provide a better fit to the new Louisville age data. The fit is particularly good for seamounts younger than 50 Ma, a period for which there is little predicted motion for the Louisville hot spot and little inter-hot spot motion with Hawaii. However, discrepancies in the Louisville age-distance record prior to 50 Ma indicate there is an extra source of inter-hot spot motion between Louisville and the other Pacific hot spots that was not corrected for in the global S04G model. Finally, based on six new Ar-40/Ar-39 age dates, the 169 W bend in the Louisville seamount trail seems to have formed at least 3 Myr before the formation of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend. The timing of the most acute parts of both bends thus appears to be asynchronous, which would require other processes (e. g., plume motions) than a global plate motion change between 50 and 47 Ma to explain these two observations.

Engels, M, Barckhausen U, Gee JS.  2008.  A new towed marine vector magnetometer: methods and results from a Central Pacific cruise. Geophysical Journal International. 172:115-129.   10.1111/j.1365-246X.2007.03601.x   AbstractWebsite

This paper focuses on new instrumental and methodological aspects of the acquisition, processing and interpretation of marine magnetic data. Between two Overhauser sensors towed as a longitudinal gradiometer, a new fluxgate vector magnetometer was employed. A second independent vector magnetometer system operated simultaneously. This equipment was used during research cruise SO-180 of R/V SONNE in the Central Pacific at about 120 degrees W just south of the equator. The survey area on the Pacific Plate is the mirror image to the currently subducting Cocos plate off Central America. The oceanic crust was formed around 23 Ma at the East Pacific Rise when the Farallon plate broke up into the Cocos and Nazca plates. The magnetic seafloor anomalies in the survey area strike approximately north-south almost parallel to the main field, resulting in very low anomaly amplitudes which had hindered detailed anomaly identification so far. A new processing scheme was applied to the data which identifies the weak anomalies in the total field and those in the vertical component that, as a consequence of the source body geometry, have about doubled amplitude. The vertical component constrains 2-D modelling much better than the total field alone. Processed fluxgate total field data are practically identical to the Overhauser reference and even provide a reliable gradient when combined with one Overhauser. Although towed vector magnetometers typically provide no independent estimate of yaw, we illustrate that a numerical yaw (bandpass filtered magnetic heading) can provide reasonable estimates of the horizontal field components. These component data open additional analysis tools: the strike direction of magnetic lineations can be estimated from single profiles by either magnetic boundary strike ellipses in the space domain or by coherences between vertical and horizontal components in the wavenumber domain. Auto power spectra of the total field provide an approximate depth to the anomaly source or, if in obvious contradiction to the bathymetric depth, allow the detection of distortions, for example, by external temporal geomagnetic variations.

Selkin, PA, Gee JS, Tauxe L.  2007.  Nonlinear thermoremanence acquisition and implications for paleointensity data. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 256:81-89.   10.1016/j.epsl.2007.01.017   AbstractWebsite

In paleointensity studies, thermoremanence is generally regarded as a linear function of ambient inagnetic field at low fields comparable to that of the present-day Earth. We find pronounced nonlinearity at low fields for a class of materials with silicate-hosted magnetite that otherwise perforin well in paleointensity experiments. We model this nonlinearity with narrow size ranges of large, acicular single domain grains, which are most likely in a vortex state (i.e. nonuniformly magnetized, sometimes labeled pseudosingle domain). Simple TRM theory predicts that even certain single domain particles will also exhibit a nonlinear response, saturating in fields as low as the Earth's. Such behavior, although likely to be rare, may bias some paleointensity estimates. The bias is especially pronounced when the laboratory field is higher than the ancient field. Fortunately, the fundamental assumption that thermoremanence is proportional to applied field can (and should) be routinely checked at the end of successful paleointensity experiments by adding two extra heating steps. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Gee, J, Tauxe L, Hildebrand JA, Staudigel H, Lonsdale P.  1988.  Nonuniform Magnetization of Jasper Seamount. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth and Planets. 93:12159-12175.   10.1029/JB093iB10p12159   AbstractWebsite

Paleopoles derived from seamounts have been used to reconstruct the tectonic history of ocean basins; however, the interpretation of seamount magnetization models and the validity of seamount paleopoles may be affected by inhomogeneous magnetization. Multibeam bathymetric data, sea surface and deep-tow magnetic field data, and paleomagnetic analyses of dredged samples were used to examine the origin of nonuniform magnetization within Jasper Seamount (30°27′N, 122°44′W). Models indicate that the seamount is predominantly reversely magnetized with local zones of normal polarity as corroborated by deep-tow measurements. Lithologies likely to be volumetrically important in a seamount edifice show highly variable magnetic properties. Basalts have high intensities (0.5–27.0 A/m), high Koenigsberger ratios (Q) and low viscous remanence (VRM) acquisition. Low Q ratios and high VRM acquisition coefficients of coarse-grained material and volcaniclastics suggest that they may have substantial viscous and induced components. Models for Jasper are characterized by low uniform intensities and far-sided paleopoles. The shallow model inclinations may be attributed to nondipolar components in the time-averaged geomagnetic field. The low intensities of the uniform models and the large nonuniform component in the seminorm solutions imply a complex distribution of magnetization sources within Jasper. This nonuniformity may result from either lithological variability or construction of the seamount spanning two or more polarity intervals.