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Morris, A, Gee JS, Pressling N, John BE, MacLeod CJ, Grimes CB, Searle RC.  2009.  Footwall rotation in an oceanic core complex quantified using reoriented Integrated Ocean Drilling Program core samples. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 287:217-228.   10.1016/j.epsl.2009.08.007   AbstractWebsite

Oceanic core complexes expose lower crustal and upper mantle rocks on the seafloor by tectonic unroofing in the footwalls of large-slip detachment faults. The common occurrence of these structures in slow and ultra-slow spread oceanic crust suggests that they accommodate a significant component of plate divergence. However, the subsurface geometry of detachment faults in oceanic core complexes remains unclear. Competing models involve either: (a) displacement on planar, low-angle faults with little tectonic rotation; or (b) progressive shallowing by rotation of initially steeply dipping faults as a result of flexural unloading (the "rolling-hinge" model). We address this debate using palaeomagnetic remanences as markers for tectonic rotation within a unique 1.4 km long footwall section of gabbroic rocks recovered by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampling at Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). These rocks contain a complex record of multipolarity magnetizations that are unrelated to alteration and igneous stratigraphy in the sampled section and are inferred to result from progressive cooling of the footwall section over geomagnetic polarity chrons C1r.2r, C1r.1n (Jaramillo) and C1r.1r. For the first time we have independently reoriented drill-core samples of lower crustal gabbros, that were initially azimuthally unconstrained, to a true geographic reference frame by correlating structures in individual core pieces with those identified from oriented imagery of the borehole wall. This allows reorientation of the palaeomagnetic data, placing far more rigorous constraints on the tectonic history than those possible using only palaeomagnetic inclination data. Analysis of the reoriented high temperature reversed component of magnetization indicates a 46 degrees +/- 6 degrees anticlockwise rotation of the footwall around a MAR-parallel horizontal axis trending 011 degrees +/- 6 degrees. Reoriented lower temperature components of normal and reversed polarity suggest that much of this rotation occurred after the end of the Jaramillo chron (0.99 Ma). The data provide unequivocal confirmation of the key prediction of flexural, rolling-hinge models for oceanic core complexes, whereby oceanic detachment faults initiate at higher dips and rotate to their present day low-angle geometries as displacement increases. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Bowers, NE, Cande SC, Gee JS, Hildebrand JA, Parker RL.  2001.  Fluctuations of the paleomagnetic field during chron C5 as recorded in near-bottom marine magnetic anomaly data. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 106:26379-26396.   10.1029/2001jb000278   AbstractWebsite

Near-bottom magnetic data contain information on paleomagnetic field fluctuations during chron C5 as observed in both the North and South Pacific. The North Pacific data include 12 survey lines collected with a spatial separation of up to 120 kin, and the South Pacific data consist of a single long line collected on the west flank of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 19 degreesS. The North Pacific magnetic profiles reveal a pattern of linear, short-wavelength (2 to 5 km) anomalies (tiny wiggles) that are highly correlated over the shortest (3.8 km) to longest (120 km) separations in the survey. Magnetic inversions incorporating basement topography show that these anomalies are not caused by the small topographic relief. The character of the near-bottom magnetic profile from anomaly 5 on the west flank of the EPR, formed at a spreading rate more than twice that of the North Pacific, displays a remark-able similarity to the individual and stacked lines from the North Pacific survey area, Over distances corresponding to 1 m.y., 19 lows in the magnetic anomaly profile can be correlated between the North and South Pacific lines. Modeling the lows as due to short polarity events suggests that they may be caused by rapid swings of the magnetic field between normal and reversed polarities with little or no time in the reversed state. Owing to the implausibly high number of reversals required to account for these anomalies and the lack of any time in the reversed state, we conclude that the near-bottom signal is primarily a record of pateointensity fluctuations during chron C5. Spectral analysis of the North Pacific near bottom lines shows that the signal is equivalent to a paleointensity curve with a temporal resolution of 40 to 60 kyr, while measurements of the smallest separations of correlatable dips in the field suggest a temporal resolution of 36 kyr.

Tauxe, L, Gee JS, Staudigel H.  1998.  Flow directions in dikes from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data: The bootstrap way. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 103:17775-17790.   10.1029/98jb01077   AbstractWebsite

One of the first applications of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was an attempt to determine flow directions from mafic dikes [Khan, 1962]. Since the seminal work of Knight and Walker [1988] defining the expected behavior of AMS in response to magma flow, there has been increasing interest in using AMS for this purpose. Here we present a quantitative method for interpretation of AMS data from dikes, using a parametric bootstrap. First, dikes must be sampled with at least five land preferrably more) samples from within 10 cm of the dike margin. The distributions of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the AMS tensor are delineated by calculating eigenparameters of many bootstrapped paradata sets. We generate paradata sets by first selecting a sample at random, then calculating a replacement set of data by drawing tensor elements from normal distributions with the mean and standard deviation of the entire site. The bounds containing 95% of the eigenparameters of the bootstrapped data serve as confidence limits for the parameter of interest. Classification of dikes proceeds as follows: Sites whose maximum and intermediate eigenvalues could not be distinguished are deemed uninterpretable. In addition, sites with principal eigenvectors with angles > 45 degrees away from the dike margin (inverse) or with markedly different directions on either side of the dike (scissored) are excluded. The remaining dikes are classified as having unique flow direction information if the principal eigenvectors from at least one side are distinct from the dike plane based on the distribution of the bootstrapped principal eigenvectors. If neither side has principal eigenvectors distinct from the dike plane, the dikes are classified as having lineation information only. A study comprising 251 dikes from the Troodos ophiolite has 151 sites with directional data, 38 sites with lineations only, 7 inverse sites, 5 scissored sites, and 55 sites not fitting into any other category. The flow directions interpreted from the data were generally southerly, toward a fossil transform zone.