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2002
Bowles, J, Gee J, Hildebrand J, Tauxe L.  2002.  Archaeomagnetic intensity results from California and Ecuador: evaluation of regional data. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 203:967-981.   10.1016/s0012-821x(02)00927-5   AbstractWebsite

We present new archaeointensity data for southeastern California (similar to33degreesN, similar to115degreesW, 50-1500 yr BP) and northwestern South America (Ecuador, 2.4degreesS, 80.7degreesW, 4000-5000 yr BP). These results represent the only data from California, as well as the oldest archaeointensity data now available in northwestern South America. In comparing our results to previously published data for the southwestern United States and northwestern South America, we note that significant scatter in the existing data makes comparisons and interpretations difficult. We undertake an analysis of the sources of data scatter (including age uncertainty, experimental errors, cooling rate differences, magnetic anisotropy, and field distortion) and evaluate the effects of scatter and error on the smoothed archaeointensity record. By making corrections where possible and eliminating questionable data, scatter is significantly reduced, especially in South America, but is far from eliminated. However, we believe the long-period fluctuations in intensity can be resolved, and differences between the Southwestern and South American records can be identified. The Southwest data are distinguished from the South American data by much higher virtual axial dipole moment values from similar to 0-600 yr BP and by a broad low between similar to 1000-1500 yr BP. Comparisons to global paleofield models reveal disagreements between the models and the archaeointensity data in these two regions, underscoring the need for additional intensity data to constrain the models in much of the world. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

2000
Gee, JS, Cande SC, Hildebrand JA, Donnelly K, Parker RL.  2000.  Geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 780 kyr obtained from near-seafloor magnetic anomalies. Nature. 408:827-832.   10.1038/35048513   AbstractWebsite

Knowledge of past variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field provides an important constraint on models of the geodynamo. A record of absolute palaeointensity for the past 50 kyr has been compiled from archaeomagnetic and volcanic materials, and relative palaeointensities over the past 800 kyr have been obtained from sedimentary sequences. But a long-term record of geomagnetic intensity should also be carried by the thermoremanence of the oceanic crust. Here we show that near-seafloor magnetic anomalies recorded over the southern East Pacific Rise are well correlated with independent estimates of geomagnetic intensity during the past 780 kyr. Moreover, the pattern of absolute palaeointensity of seafloor glass samples from the same area agrees with the well-documented dipole intensity pattern for the past 50 kyr. A comparison of palaeointensities derived from seafloor glass samples with global intensity variations thus allows us to estimate the ages of surficial lava flows in this region. The record of geomagnetic intensity preserved in the oceanic crust should provide a higher-time-resolution record of crustal accretion processes at mid-ocean ridges than has previously been obtainable.

1991
Gee, J, Staudigel H, Natland JH.  1991.  Geology and petrology of Jasper Seamount. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth and Planets. 96:4083-4105.   10.1029/90jb02364   AbstractWebsite

Fifteen dredges on the summit and upper flanks of Jasper Seamount (122-degrees 44'W; 30-degrees 27'N) recovered a wide variety of lithologies, including pillow lavas, vesicular lapillistones from shallow submarine explosive volcanism, and a range of xenoliths. On the basis of dredge locations, geochemical characteristics, and Ar-40/Ar-39 age data, three distinct phases of volcanism can be distinguished, a shield-building tholeiitic/transitional phase (Flank Transitional Series, FTS), followed by a flank alkalic series (FAS), and a late-stage Summit Alkalic Series (SAS). All three series consist exclusively of differentiated (Mg# = 54 to 21; Mg# = Mg2+/(Mg2+ + Fe2+)) compositions. The FTS represents a low-pressure differentiation trend from tholeiitic/transitional basalts to quartz-normative residual liquids and probably accounts for more than 90% of the volume of Jasper. Ar-40/Ar-39 age data, the dominant reversed polarity of Jasper, and a plausible duration (< 1 m.y.) for shield construction suggest FTS volcanism began about 11 Ma and ended about 10 Ma. FTS lavas probably erupted from a NW trending, hotspot track-parallel rift system. The intermediate alkalinity FAS lavas, which probably comprise 3-8% of the volume of Jasper, erupted from 8.7 to 7.5 Ma, possibly after a brief volcanic hiatus or period of reduced eruptive activity. Normative projections suggest the FAS lavas are the product of fractionation or equilibration at elevated pressures. The hawaiites and mugearites of the SAS erupted between 4.8 and 4.1 Ma, after a probable 2.7 m.y. period of volcanic quiescence, and probably constitute < 1% of the seamount volume. A suite of xenoliths incorporated in SAS lavas includes (1) tholeiitic basalt fragments from either the ocean crust or seamount interior, (2) a range of differentiated gabbros largely derived from the ocean crust, (3) residual mantle spinel lherzolites, and (4) pyroxenite and peridotite cumulates. The abundance of crustal gabbro and spinel lherzolite xenoliths in evolved lavas of the SAS suggests that these lavas probably fractionated in a magma chamber at the crust-mantle boundary. The occurrence of orthopyroxene-bearing alkalic cumulate xenoliths in these lavas, however, is enigmatic and may reflect complexities such as magma mixing or the inappropriateness of pressure estimates. The SAS vents of Jasper define a NE-SW volcanic trend which is orthogonal to the FTS rift. The pattern of volcanic activity, including periods of volcanic quiescence, and the general increase in alkalinity, as well as the structural reorganization of magmatic feeder systems of Jasper Seamount, is strikingly similar to the patterns observed on Hawaiian volcanoes. Thus our data from Jasper (690 km3) extend the concepts of structural and petrological evolution of hotspot volcanoes based on Hawaii to moderate-sized seamounts.