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Tarduno, JA, Gee J.  1995.  Large-Scale Motion Between Pacific and Atlantic Hotspots. Nature. 378:477-480.   10.1038/378477a0   AbstractWebsite

STUDIES of true polar wander (TPW), the rotation of the solid Earth with respect to the spin axis(1), have suggested that there has been 10-15 degrees of relative motion over the past 130 Myr (refs 2-4). In such studies, the orientation of the spin axis is recovered from continental palaeomagnetic poles (corrected for relative plate motions), and compared with a deep-mantle reference frame defined by hotspot locations. But deducing relative plate motions becomes increasingly difficult for older (Mesozoic) time periods, hindering tests of TPW on timescales comparable to those of large-scale mantle convection; moreover, the assumption of hotspot fixity is controversial(5,6). We examine here a more direct approach(7,8), using palaeolatitudes derived from Pacific guyots. Contrary to predictions from TPW models, these data suggest only minor latitudinal shifts of Pacific hotspots during the Cretaceous period. Instead of TPW, relative motion between the Atlantic and Pacific hotspot groups(9) is required at a velocity of approximately 30 mm yr(-1), more than 50% larger than previously proposed(5).

Tauxe, L, Gee JS, Staudigel H.  1998.  Flow directions in dikes from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data: The bootstrap way. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 103:17775-17790.   10.1029/98jb01077   AbstractWebsite

One of the first applications of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was an attempt to determine flow directions from mafic dikes [Khan, 1962]. Since the seminal work of Knight and Walker [1988] defining the expected behavior of AMS in response to magma flow, there has been increasing interest in using AMS for this purpose. Here we present a quantitative method for interpretation of AMS data from dikes, using a parametric bootstrap. First, dikes must be sampled with at least five land preferrably more) samples from within 10 cm of the dike margin. The distributions of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the AMS tensor are delineated by calculating eigenparameters of many bootstrapped paradata sets. We generate paradata sets by first selecting a sample at random, then calculating a replacement set of data by drawing tensor elements from normal distributions with the mean and standard deviation of the entire site. The bounds containing 95% of the eigenparameters of the bootstrapped data serve as confidence limits for the parameter of interest. Classification of dikes proceeds as follows: Sites whose maximum and intermediate eigenvalues could not be distinguished are deemed uninterpretable. In addition, sites with principal eigenvectors with angles > 45 degrees away from the dike margin (inverse) or with markedly different directions on either side of the dike (scissored) are excluded. The remaining dikes are classified as having unique flow direction information if the principal eigenvectors from at least one side are distinct from the dike plane based on the distribution of the bootstrapped principal eigenvectors. If neither side has principal eigenvectors distinct from the dike plane, the dikes are classified as having lineation information only. A study comprising 251 dikes from the Troodos ophiolite has 151 sites with directional data, 38 sites with lineations only, 7 inverse sites, 5 scissored sites, and 55 sites not fitting into any other category. The flow directions interpreted from the data were generally southerly, toward a fossil transform zone.

Tauxe, L, Gee JS, Steiner MB, Staudigel H.  2013.  Paleointensity results from the Jurassic: New constraints from submarine basaltic glasses of ODP Site 801C. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.   10.1002/2013GC004704   AbstractWebsite

Tholeiite of the oldest oceanic crust was drilled during ODP Legs 129 and 185 at Hole 801C in the western Pacific. Fresh appearing submarine basaltic glass (SBG) was recovered from the tholetiites (~167 Ma; Koppers et al. [2003]) which has been shown to be nearly ideal for determining absolute paleointensity. Paleointensities of the younger, off-axis, alkalic basalts (~160 Ma; Koppers et al. [2003]), overlying the tholeiites, had been studied earlier [Tauxe, 2006]. Here we report results from the older tholeiitic (on-axis) sequence. We subjected a total of 73 specimens from 17 cooling units to absolute paleointensity experiments. Of these, 30 specimens and 6 cooling unit averages met our strictest reliability criteria, yielding an average of 11.9± 3.9 μT. The bulk of evidence suggests a paleolatitude of the site of 14°S (with an uncertainty of 10°). This translates the intensity to a value for the virtual axial dipole moment of 28 ZAm2, slightly lower than values determined from the plagio clase crystals in the three cooling units of the younger alkalic basalts over lying the tholeiites. This value is low when compared to the long-term median value of the field of 42 ZAm2. Our results and those of the published literature therefore support the contention of a low magnetic field strength in the Jurassic (average of 28 ± 14 ZAm2; N = 138 individual estimates), as initially suggested by Prévot et al. [1990]. Our interpretation of the body of available data argue for low field strengths for the entire Jurassic extending into the early Cretaceous.

Tauxe, L, Gee J, Gallet Y, Pick T, Bown T.  1994.  Magnetostratigraphy of the Willwood Formation, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming - New Constraints on the Location of Paleocene Eocene Boundary. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 125:159-172.   10.1016/0012-821x(94)90213-5   AbstractWebsite

The lower Eocene Willwood Formation in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming preserves a rich and diverse mammalian and floral record. The paleomagnetic behavior of the sequence of floodplain paleosols of varying degrees of maturation ranges from excellent to poor. We present a magnetostratigraphic section for a composite section near Worland, Wyoming, by using a set of strict criteria for interpreting the step-wise alternating field and thermal demagnetization data of 266 samples from 90 sites throughout the composite section. Correlation to the geomagnetic reversal time scale was achieved by combining magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from this section, from a section in the Clark's Fork Basin in northern Wyoming, and from DSDP Site 550, with the isotopic date determined on a tuff near the top of our section. Our correlation suggests that the Bighorn Basin composite section in the Worland area spans from within Chron C24r to near the top of Chron C24n, or from approximately 55 to 52 Ma. This correlation places the Paleocene/Eocene boundary within the vicinity of the base of the section. Cryptochron C24r.6 of Cande and Kent is tentatively identified some 100 m above the base of the section. The temporal framework provided here enables correlation of the mammalian biostratigraphy of the Bighorn Basin to other continental sequences as well as to marine records. It also provides independent chronological information for the calculation of sediment accumulation rates to constrain soil maturation rates. We exclude an age as young as 53 Ma for the Paleocene/Eocene boundary and support older ages, as recommended in recent time scales. The location of a tuff dated at 52.8 +/- 0.3 Ma at the older boundary C24n.1 is consistent with the, age of 52.5 Ma estimated by Cande and Kent and inconsistent with that of 53.7 Ma, from Harland et al.