Publications

Export 8 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Asc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q [R] S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
B
Bertler, NAN, Conway H, Dahl-Jensen D, Emanuelsson DB, Winstrup M, Vallelonga PT, Lee JE, Brook EJ, Severinghaus JP, Fudge TJ, Keller ED, Baisden WT, Hindmarsh RCA, Neff PD, Blunier T, Edwards R, Mayewski PA, Kipfstuhl S, Buizert C, Canessa S, Dadic R, Kjaer HA, Kurbatov A, Zhang DQ, Waddington ED, Baccolo G, Beers T, Brightley HJ, Carter L, Clemens-Sewall D, Ciobanu VG, Delmonte B, Eling L, Ellis A, Ganesh S, Golledge NR, Haines S, Handley M, Hawley RL, Hogan CM, Johnson KM, Korotkikh E, Lowry DP, Mandeno D, McKay RM, Menking JA, Naish TR, Noerling C, Ollive A, Orsi A, Proemse BC, Pyne AR, Pyne RL, Renwick J, Scherer RP, Semper S, Simonsen M, Sneed SB, Steig EJ, Tuohy A, Venugopal AU, Valero-Delgado F, Venkatesh J, Wang FT, Wang SM, Winski DA, Winton VHL, Whiteford A, Xiao CD, Yang J, Zhang X.  2018.  The Ross Sea Dipole - temperature, snow accumulation and sea ice variability in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica, over the past 2700 years. Climate of the Past. 14:193-214.   10.5194/cp-14-193-2018   AbstractWebsite

High-resolution, well-dated climate archives provide an opportunity to investigate the dynamic interactions of climate patterns relevant for future projections. Here, we present data from a new, annually dated ice core record from the eastern Ross Sea, named the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core. Comparison of this record with climate reanalysis data for the 1979-2012 interval shows that RICE reliably captures temperature and snow precipitation variability in the region. Trends over the past 2700 years in RICE are shown to be distinct from those in West Antarctica and the western Ross Sea captured by other ice cores. For most of this interval, the eastern Ross Sea was warming (or showing isotopic enrichment for other reasons), with increased snow accumulation and perhaps decreased sea ice concentration. However, West Antarctica cooled and the western Ross Sea showed no significant isotope temperature trend. This pattern here is referred to as the Ross Sea Dipole. Notably, during the Little Ice Age, West Antarctica and the western Ross Sea experienced colder than average temperatures, while the eastern Ross Sea underwent a period of warming or increased isotopic enrichment. From the 17th century onwards, this dipole relationship changed. All three regions show current warming, with snow accumulation declining in West Antarctica and the eastern Ross Sea but increasing in the western Ross Sea. We interpret this pattern as reflecting an increase in sea ice in the eastern Ross Sea with perhaps the establishment of a modern Roosevelt Island polynya as a local moisture source for RICE.

Buizert, C, Baggenstos D, Jiang W, Purtschert R, Petrenko VV, Lu ZT, Muller P, Kuhl T, Lee J, Severinghaus JP, Brook EJ.  2014.  Radiometric Kr-81 dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 111:6876-6881.   10.1073/pnas.1320329111   AbstractWebsite

We present successful Kr-81-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four similar to 350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The Kr-81 radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 +/- 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) Kr-85 and Ar-39 analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the Kr-81 ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA Kr-81 analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, Kr-81 dating of ice cores is a future possibility.

Butler, JH, Battle M, Bender ML, Montzka SA, Clarke AD, Saltzman ES, Sucher CM, Severinghaus JP, Elkins JW.  1999.  A record of atmospheric halocarbons during the twentieth century from polar firn air. Nature. 399:749-755.   10.1038/21586   AbstractWebsite

Measurements of trace gases in air trapped in polar firn (unconsolidated snow) demonstrate that natural sources of chlorofluorocarbons, halons, persistent chlorocarbon solvents and sulphur hexafluoride to the atmosphere are minimal or non-existent. Atmospheric concentrations of these gases, reconstructed back to the late nineteenth century, are consistent with atmospheric histories derived from anthropogenic emission rates and known atmospheric lifetimes. The measurements confirm the predominance of human activity in the atmospheric budget of organic chlorine, and allow the estimation of atmospheric histories of halogenated gases of combined anthropogenic and natural origin. The pre-twentieth-century burden of methyl chloride was close to that at present, while the burden of methyl bromide was probably over half of today's value.

G
Goodge, JW, Severinghaus JP.  2016.  Rapid Access Ice Drill: a new tool for exploration of the deep Antarctic ice sheets and subglacial geology. Journal of Glaciology. 62:1049-1064.   10.1017/jog.2016.97   AbstractWebsite

A new Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) will penetrate the Antarctic ice sheets in order to create borehole observatories and take cores in deep ice, the glacial bed and bedrock below. RAID is a mobile drilling system to make multiple long, narrow boreholes in a single field season in Antarctica. RAID is based on a mineral exploration-type rotary rock-coring system using threaded drill pipe to cut through ice using reverse circulation of a non-freezing fluid for pressure-compensation, maintenance of temperature and removal of ice cuttings. Near the bottom of the ice sheet, a wireline latching assembly will enable rapid coring of ice, the glacial bed and bedrock below. Once complete, boreholes will be kept open with fluid, capped and available for future down-hole measurement of temperature gradient, heat flow, ice chronology and ice deformation. RAID is designed to penetrate up to 3300 m of ice and take cores in <200 hours, allowing completion of a borehole and coring in similar to 10 d at each site. Together, the rapid drilling capability and mobility of the system, along with ice-penetrating imaging methods, will provide a unique 3-D picture of interior and subglacial features of the Antarctic ice sheets.

Grachev, AM, Severinghaus JP.  2005.  A revised +10 +/- 4 degrees C magnitude of the abrupt change in Greenland temperature at the Younger Dryas termination using published GISP2 gas isotope data and air thermal diffusion constants. Quaternary Science Reviews. 24:513-519.   10.1016/j.quascirev.2004.10.016   AbstractWebsite

We revisit the portion of (Nature 391 (1998) 141) devoted to the abrupt temperature increase reconstruction at the Younger Dryas/Preboreal transition. The original estimate of + 5 to + 10 degrees C abrupt warming is revised to + 10 +/- 4 degrees C. The gas isotope data from the original work were employed, combined with recently measured precise air thermal diffusion constants (Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67 (2003a) 345; J. Phys. Chem. 23A (2003b) 4636). The new constants allow a robust interpretation of the gas isotope signal in terms of temperature change. This was not possible at the time of the original work, when no air constants were available. Three quasi-independent approaches employed in this work all give the same result of a + 10 degrees C warming in several decades or less. The new result provides a firm target for climate models that attempt to predict future climates. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Grachev, AM, Brook EJ, Severinghaus JP, Pisias NG.  2009.  Relative timing and variability of atmospheric methane and GISP2 oxygen isotopes between 68 and 86 ka. Global Biogeochemical Cycles. 23   10.1029/2008gb003330   AbstractWebsite

The global biogeochemical cycle of methane has received wide attention because of methane's role as a greenhouse gas. Measurements of methane in air trapped in Greenland ice cores provide a high-resolution record of methane levels in the atmosphere over the past similar to 100 ka, providing clues about what controls the methane cycle on geologic timescales. Remarkable similarity between local temperature recorded in Greenland ice cores and changes in global methane concentrations has been noted in previous studies, with the inference that the local temperature variations have global significance, but the resolution of sampling and measurement precision limited fine-scale comparison of these variables. In this work a higher-precision (similar to 2 ppb) methane data set was obtained from the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) ice core for the time interval between 86 and 68 ka, encompassing three large abrupt warming events early in the last glacial period: Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events 19, 20, and 21. The new data set consists of duplicate measurements at 158 depths, with average time resolution of 120 years. Such detailed measurements over D-O 21, the longest in Greenland records, have not yet been reported for other ice cores. The new data set documents short-term variability (similar to 20 ppb typical amplitude), which is remarkably persistent, and in many cases similar features are observed in the most detailed published delta(18)O(ice) record. High-precision GISP2 delta(15)N data show that changes in Greenland temperature are synchronous with the methane variations at the onset of D-O events 19, 20, and 21, supporting previous results from the Greenland Ice Core Project ice core for D-O 19 and 20. Cross-spectral analysis quantifies the extremely close similarity between the new methane record and the delta(18)O(ice) record. Because methane sources are widely distributed over the globe, this work further validates delta(18)O(ice) at Greenland summit as a geographically broad climate indicator on millennial to multicentennial timescales.

L
Lee, JY, Marti K, Severinghaus JP, Kawamura K, Yoo HS, Lee JB, Kim JS.  2006.  A redetermination of the isotopic abundances of atmospheric Ar. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 70:4507-4512.   10.1016/j.gca.2006.06.1563   AbstractWebsite

Atmospheric argon measured on a dynamically operated mass spectrometer with an ion source magnet, indicated systematically larger Ar-40/Ar-16 ratios compared to the generally accepted value of Nier [Nier A.O., 1950. A redetermination of the relative abundances of the isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and potassium. Phys. Rev. 77, 789-793], 295.5 +/- 0.5, which has served as the standard for all isotopic measurements in geochemistry and cosmochemistry. Gravimetrically prepared mixtures of highly enriched Ar-36 and Ar-40 were utilized to redetermine the isotopic abundances of atmospheric Ar, using a dynamically operated isotope ratio mass spectrometer with minor modifications and special gas handling techniques to avoid fractionation. A new ratio Ar-40/Ar-36 = 298.56 +/- 0.31 was obtained with a precision of 0.1%, approximately 1% higher than the previously accepted value. Combined with the Ar-38/Ar-36 (0.1885 +/- 0.0003) measured with a VG5400 noble gas mass spectrometer in static operation, the percent abundances of Ar-36, Ar-38, and Ar-40 were determined to be 0.3336 +/- 0.0004, 0.0629 +/- 0.0001, and 99.6035 +/- 0.0004, respectively. We calculate an atomic mass of Ar of 39.9478 +/- 0.0002. Accurate Ar isotopic abundances are relevant in numerous applications, as the calibration of the mass spectrometer discrimination. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

O
Orsi, AJ, Kawamura K, Masson-Delmotte V, Fettweis X, Box JE, Dahl-Jensen D, Clow GD, Landais A, Severinghaus JP.  2017.  The recent warming trend in North Greenland. Geophysical Research Letters. 44:6235-6243.   10.1002/2016gl072212   AbstractWebsite

The Arctic is among the fastest warming regions on Earth, but it is also one with limited spatial coverage of multidecadal instrumental surface air temperature measurements. Consequently, atmospheric reanalyses are relatively unconstrained in this region, resulting in a large spread of estimated 30 year recent warming trends, which limits their use to investigate the mechanisms responsible for this trend. Here we present a surface temperature reconstruction over 1982-2011 at NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling Project, 51 degrees W, 77 degrees N), in North Greenland, based on the inversion of borehole temperature and inert gas isotope data. We find that NEEM has warmed by 2.7 +/- 0.33 degrees C over the past 30 years, from the long-term 1900-1970 average of -28.55 +/- 0.29 degrees C. The warming trend is principally caused by an increase in downward longwave heat flux. Atmospheric reanalyses underestimate this trend by 17%, underlining the need for more in situ observations to validate reanalyses.