Publications

Export 2 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Desc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K [L] M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
L
Lee, JY, Marti K, Severinghaus JP, Kawamura K, Yoo HS, Lee JB, Kim JS.  2006.  A redetermination of the isotopic abundances of atmospheric Ar. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 70:4507-4512.   10.1016/j.gca.2006.06.1563   AbstractWebsite

Atmospheric argon measured on a dynamically operated mass spectrometer with an ion source magnet, indicated systematically larger Ar-40/Ar-16 ratios compared to the generally accepted value of Nier [Nier A.O., 1950. A redetermination of the relative abundances of the isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and potassium. Phys. Rev. 77, 789-793], 295.5 +/- 0.5, which has served as the standard for all isotopic measurements in geochemistry and cosmochemistry. Gravimetrically prepared mixtures of highly enriched Ar-36 and Ar-40 were utilized to redetermine the isotopic abundances of atmospheric Ar, using a dynamically operated isotope ratio mass spectrometer with minor modifications and special gas handling techniques to avoid fractionation. A new ratio Ar-40/Ar-36 = 298.56 +/- 0.31 was obtained with a precision of 0.1%, approximately 1% higher than the previously accepted value. Combined with the Ar-38/Ar-36 (0.1885 +/- 0.0003) measured with a VG5400 noble gas mass spectrometer in static operation, the percent abundances of Ar-36, Ar-38, and Ar-40 were determined to be 0.3336 +/- 0.0004, 0.0629 +/- 0.0001, and 99.6035 +/- 0.0004, respectively. We calculate an atomic mass of Ar of 39.9478 +/- 0.0002. Accurate Ar isotopic abundances are relevant in numerous applications, as the calibration of the mass spectrometer discrimination. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Landais, A, Caillon N, Severinghaus J, Barnola JM, Goujon C, Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V.  2004.  Isotopic measurements of air trapped in ice to quantify temperature changes. Comptes Rendus Geoscience. 336:963-970.   10.1016/j.crte.2004.03.013   AbstractWebsite

Isotopic measurements of air trapped in ice to quantify temperature changes. Isotopic measurements in polar ice core have shown a succession of rapid warming periods during the last glacial period over Greenland. However, this method underestimates the surface temperature variations. A new method based on gas thermal diffusion in the firn manages to quantify surface temperature variations through associated isotopic fractionations. We developed a method to extract air from the ice and to perform isotopic measurements to reduce analytical uncertainties to 0.006 and 0.020parts per thousand for delta(15)N and delta(40)Ar. It led to a 16 +/- 1.5degreesC surface temperature variation during a rapid warming (-70000 yr). (C) 2004 Academie des sciences. Publie par Elsevier SAS. Tous droits reserves.