Publications

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2011
Wolfe, CJ, Solomon SC, Laske G, Collins JA, Detrick RS, Orcutt JA, Bercovici D, Hauri EH.  2011.  Mantle P-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian hotspot. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 303:267-280.   10.1016/j.epsl.2011.01.004   AbstractWebsite

Three-dimensional images of P-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian Islands, obtained from a network of seafloor and land seismometers, show an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a high-velocity anomaly in the shallow upper mantle that is parabolic in map view. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle tansition zone between 410 and 660 km depth and extend into the topmost lower mantle, although the resolution of lower mantle structure from this data set is limited. Comparisons of inversions with separate data sets at different frequencies suggest that contamination by water reverberations is not markedly biasing the P-wave imaging of mantle structure. Many aspects of the P-wave images are consistent with independent tomographic images of S-wave velocity in the region, but there are some differences in upper mantle structure between P-wave and S-wave velocities. Inversions without station terms show a southwestward shift in the location cif lowest P-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle relative to the pattern for shear waves, and inversions with station terms show differences between P-wave and S-wave velocity heterogeneity in the shallow upper mantle beneath and immediately east of the island of Hawaii. Nonetheless, the combined data sets are in general agreement with the hypothesis that the Hawaiian hotspot is the result of an upwelling, high-temperature plume. The broad upper-mantle low-velocity region beneath the Hawaiian Islands may reflect the diverging "pancake" at the top of the upwelling zone; the surrounding region of high velocities could represent a downwelling curtain; and the low-velocity anomalies southeast of Hawaii in the transition zone and topmost lower mantle are consistent with predictions of plume tilt. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2004
Sutherland, FH, Vernon FL, Orcutt JA, Collins JA, Stephen RA.  2004.  Results from OSNPE: Improved teleseismic earthquake detection at the seafloor. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 94:1868-1878.   10.1785/012003088   AbstractWebsite

Earthquake data from three ocean seismic network (OSN) sensors, located (1) on the seafloor, (2) buried in seafloor sediments and (3) in a borehole, together with those from Hawaiian Island stations, were compared by calculating threshold-detection magnitudes for P-, S-, Rayleigh-, and Love-wave arrivals. Our results show that the borehole seismometer had noise levels similar to those of the Island stations and produced high-quality high- and low-frequency body- and surface-wave data. Shallow burial of the seismometer in the sediments had no effect on higher frequencies but significantly reduced low-frequency noise levels so that data for S and Rayleigh waves were of high quality. In fact, the buried seismometer was characterized by the lowest noise levels at very low frequencies (<20 mHz; Collins et al., 2001). The ocean-floor seismometer was consistently noisy, and the data produced were of lower quality. Both observed magnitudes and calculated threshold magnitudes were lower by more than an order of magnitude than those observed in previous studies. Results for short-period body waves at the borehole instrument in particular were much better than those that were previously found for any ocean-bottom recording.