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2015
Day, JMD, Walker RJ.  2015.  Highly siderophile element depletion in the Moon. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 423:114-124.   10.1016/j.epsl.2015.05.001   Abstract

Coupled 187Os/188Os and highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) abundance data are reported for Apollo 12 (12005, 12009, 12019, 12022, 12038, 12039, 12040), Apollo 15 (15555) and Apollo 17 (70135) mare basalts, along with mare basalt meteorites La Paz icefield (LAP) 04841 and Miller Range (MIL) 05035. These mare basalts have consistently low HSE abundances, at ∼2×10−5 to 2×10−7 the chondritic abundance. The most magnesian samples have broadly chondrite-relative HSE abundances and chondritic measured and calculated initial 187Os/188Os. The lower abundances and fractionated HSE compositions of more evolved mare basalts can be reproduced by modeling crystal–liquid fractionation using rock/melt bulk-partition coefficients of ∼2 for Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd and ∼1.5 for Re. Lunar mare basalt bulk-partition coefficients are probably higher than for terrestrial melts as a result of more reducing conditions, leading to increased HSE compatibility. The chondritic-relative abundances and chondritic 187Os/188Os of the most primitive high-MgO mare basalts cannot readily be explained through regolith contamination during emplacement at the lunar surface. Mare basalt compositions are best modeled as representing ∼5–11% partial melting of metal-free sources with low Os, Ir, Ru, Pd (∼0.1 ng g−1), Pt (∼0.2 ng g−1), Re (∼0.01 ng g−1) and S (∼75 μg g−1), with sulphide-melt partitioning between 1000 and 10,000.

Apollo 12 olivine-, pigeonite- and ilmenite normative mare basalts define an imprecise 187Re–187Os age of 3.0±0.9 Ga with an initial 187Os/188Os of 0.107±0.010. This age is within uncertainty of 147Sm–143Nd ages for the samples. The initial Os isotopic composition of Apollo 12 samples indicates that the source of these rocks evolved with Re/Os within ∼10% of chondrite meteorites, from the time that the mantle source became a system closed to siderophile additions, to the time that the basalts erupted. Similarity in absolute HSE abundances between mare basalts from the Apollo 12, 15 and 17 sites, and from unknown regions of the Moon (La Paz mare basalts, MIL 05035), indicates relatively homogeneous and low HSE abundances within the lunar interior. Low absolute HSE abundances and chondritic Re/Os of mare basalts are consistent with a late accretion addition of ∼0.02 wt.% of the Moon's mass to the mantle, prior to the formation of the lunar crust. Late accretion must also have occurred significantly prior to cessation of lunar mantle differentiation (>4.4 Ga), to enable efficient mixing and homogenization within the mantle. Low lunar HSE abundances are consistent with proportionally 40 times more late accretion to Earth than the Moon. Disproportional late accretion to the two bodies is consistent with the small 182W excess (∼21–28 ppm) measured in lunar rocks, compared to the silicate Earth.

Magna, T, Day JMD, Mezger K, Fehr MA, Dohmen R, Aoudjehane HC, Agee CB.  2015.  Lithium isotope constraints on crust–mantle interactions and surface processes on Mars. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 162:46-65.   10.1016/j.gca.2015.04.029   Abstract

Lithium abundances and isotope compositions are reported for a suite of martian meteorites that span the range of petrological and geochemical types recognized to date for Mars. Samples include twenty-one bulk-rock enriched, intermediate and depleted shergottites, six nakhlites, two chassignites, the orthopyroxenite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 and the polymict breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034. Shergottites unaffected by terrestrial weathering exhibit a range in δ7Li from 2.1 to 6.2‰, similar to that reported for pristine terrestrial peridotites and unaltered mid-ocean ridge and ocean island basalts. Two chassignites have δ7Li values (4.0‰) intermediate to the shergottite range, and combined, these meteorites provide the most robust current constraints on δ7Li of the martian mantle. The polymict breccia NWA 7034 has the lowest δ7Li (−0.2‰) of all terrestrially unaltered martian meteorites measured to date and may represent an isotopically light surface end-member.

The new data for NWA 7034 imply that martian crustal surface materials had both a lighter Li isotope composition and elevated Li abundance compared with their associated mantle. These findings are supported by Li data for olivine-phyric shergotitte NWA 1068, a black glass phase isolated from the Tissint meteorite fall, and some nakhlites, which all show evidence for assimilation of a low-δ7Li crustal component. The range in δ7Li for nakhlites (1.8 to 5.2‰), and co-variations with chlorine abundance, suggests crustal contamination by Cl-rich brines. The differences in Li isotope composition and abundance between the martian mantle and estimated crust are not as large as the fractionations observed for terrestrial continental crust and mantle, suggesting a difference in the styles of alteration and weathering between water-dominated processes on Earth versus possibly Cl–S-rich brines on Mars. Using high-MgO shergottites (>15 wt.% MgO) it is possible to estimate the δ7Li of Bulk Silicate Mars (BSM) to be 4.2 ± 0.9‰ (2σ). This value is at the higher end of estimates for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE; 3.5 ± 1.0‰, 2σ), but overlaps within uncertainty.

Day, JMD.  2015.  Planet formation processes revealed by meteorites. Geology Today. 31(1):12-20.   10.1111/gto.12082   Abstract

The history of the solar system is locked within the planets, asteroids and other objects that orbit the Sun. While remote observations of these celestial bodies are essential for understanding planetary processes, much of the geological and geochemical information regarding solar system heritage comes directly from the study of rocks and other materials originating from them. The diversity of materials available for study from planetary bodies largely comes from meteorites; fragments of rock that fall through Earth’s atmosphere after impact-extraction from their parent planet or asteroid. These extra-terrestrial objects are fundamental scientific materials, providing information on past conditions within planets, and on their surfaces, and revealing the timing of key events that affected a planet’s evolution. Meteorites can be sub-divided into four main groups: (1) chondrites, which are unmelted and variably metamorphosed ‘cosmic sediments’ composed of particles that made up the early solar nebula; (2) achondrites, which represent predominantly silicate materials from asteroids and planets that have partially to fully melted, from a broadly chondritic initial composition; (3) iron meteorites, which represent Fe-Ni samples from the cores of asteroids and planetesimals; and (4) stony-iron meteorites such as pallasites and mesosiderites, which are mixtures of metal and dominantly basaltic materials. Meteorite studies are rapidly expanding our understanding of how the solar system formed and when and how key events such as planetary accretion and differentiation occurred. Together with a burgeoning collection of classified meteorites, these scientific advances herald an unprecedented period of further scientific challenges and discoveries, an exciting prospect for understanding our origins.

2014
Franz, HB, Kim ST, Farquhar J, Day JMD, Economos RC, McKeegan KD, Schmitt AK, Irving AJ, Hoek J, Dottin J.  2014.  Isotopic links between atmospheric chemistry and the deep sulphur cycle on Mars. Nature. 508:364-+.   10.1038/nature13175   AbstractWebsite

The geochemistry of Martian meteorites provides a wealth of information about the solid planet and the surface and atmospheric processes that occurred on Mars. The degree to which Martian magmas may have assimilated crustal material, thus altering the geochemical signatures acquired from their mantle sources, is unclear(1). This issue features prominently in efforts to understand whether the source of light rare-earth elements in enriched shergottites lies in crustal material incorporated into melts(1,2) or in mixing between enriched and depleted mantle reservoirs(3). Sulphur isotope systematics offer insight into some aspects of crustal assimilation. The presence of igneous sulphides in Martian meteorites with sulphur isotope signatures indicative of mass-independent fractionation suggests the assimilation of sulphur both during passage of magmas through the crust of Mars and at sites of emplacement. Here we report isotopic analyses of 40 Martian meteorites that represent more than half of the distinct known Martian meteorites, including 30 shergottites (28 plus 2 pairs, where pairs are separate fragments of a single meteorite), 8 nakhlites (5 plus 3 pairs), Allan Hills 84001 and Chassigny. Our data provide strong evidence that assimilation of sulphur into Martian magmas was a common occurrence throughout much of the planet's history. The signature of mass-independent fractionation observed also indicates that the atmospheric imprint of photochemical processing preserved in Martian meteoritic sulphide and sulphate is distinct from that observed in terrestrial analogues, suggesting fundamental differences between the dominant sulphur chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars and that in the atmosphere of Earth(4).

Peters, BJ, Day JMD.  2014.  Assessment of relative Ti, Ta, and Nb (TITAN) enrichments in ocean island basalts. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. 15(11):4424-4444.   10.1002/2014GC005506   Abstract

The sensitivity of trace element concentrations to processes governing solid-melt interactions has made them valuable tools for tracing the effects of partial melting, fractional crystallization, metasomatism, and similar processes on the composition of a parental melt. Recent studies of ocean island basalts (OIB) have sought to correlate Ti, Ta, and Nb (TITAN) anomalies to isotopic tracers, such as 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os ratios, which may trace primordial deep mantle sources. A new compilation of global OIB trace element abundance data indicates that positive TITAN anomalies, though statistically pervasive features of OIB, may not be compositional features of their mantle sources. OIB show a range of Ti (Ti/Ti* = 0.28–2.35), Ta (Ta/Ta* = 0.11–93.4), and Nb (Nb/Nb* = 0.13–17.8) anomalies that show negligible correlations with 3He/4He ratios, indicating that TITAN anomalies are not derived from the less-degassed mantle source traced by high-3He/4He. Positive TITAN anomalies can be modeled using variable degrees (0.1–10%) of nonmodal batch partial melting of garnet-spinel lherzolite at temperatures and pressures considered typical for OIB petrogenesis, and subjecting this partial melt to fractional crystallization and assimilation of mid-ocean ridge basalt-like crust (AFC). Correlations of TITAN anomalies with modal abundances of olivine and clinopyroxene in porphyritic Canary Islands lavas provide empirical support for this process and indicate that high abundances of these phases in OIB may create misleading trace element anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized spider diagrams. Because partial melting and AFC are common to all mantle-derived magmas, caution should be used when attributing TITAN anomalies to direct sampling of recycled or deep mantle sources by hotspots.

Hyde, BC, Day JMD, Tait KT, Ash RD, Holdsworth DW, Moser DE.  2014.  Characterization of weathering and heterogeneous mineral phase distribution in brachinite Northwest Africa 4872. Meteoritics and Planetary Science. 49(7):1141-1156.   10.1111/maps.12320   Abstract

Terrestrial weathering of hot desert achondrite meteorite finds and heterogeneous phase distributions in meteorites can complicate interpretation of petrological and geochemical information regarding parent-body processes. For example, understanding the effects of weathering is important for establishing chalcophile and siderophile element distributions within sulfide and metal phases in meteorites. Heterogeneous mineral phase distribution in relatively coarsely grained meteorites can also lead to uncertainties relating to compositional representativeness. Here, we investigate the weathering and high-density (e.g., sulfide, spinel, Fe-oxide) phase distribution in sections of ultramafic achondrite meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 4872. NWA 4872 is an olivine-rich brachinite (Fo63.6 ± 0.5) with subsidiary pyroxene (Fs9.7 ± 0.1Wo46.3 ± 0.2), Cr-spinel (Cr# = 70.3 ± 1.1), and weathered sulfide and metal. Raman mapping confirms that weathering has redistributed sulfur from primary troilite, resulting in the formation of Fe-oxide (-hydroxide) and marcasite (FeS2). From Raman mapping, NWA 4872 is composed of olivine (89%), Ca-rich pyroxene (0.4%), and Cr-spinel (1.1%), with approximately 7% oxidized metal and sulfide and 2.3% marcasite-dominated sulfide. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) observations reveal high-density regions, demonstrating heterogeneities in mineral distribution. Precision cutting of the largest high-density region revealed a single 2 mm Cr-spinel grain. Despite the weathering in NWA 4872, rare earth element (REE) abundances of pyroxene determined by laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) indicate negligible modification of these elements in this mineral phase. The REE abundances of mineral grains in NWA 4872 are consistent with formation of the meteorite as the residuum of the partial melting process that occurred on its parent body. LA-ICP-MS analyses of sulfide and alteration products demonstrate the mobility of Re and/or Os; however, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns remain faithful recorders of processes acting on the brachinite parent body(ies). Detailed study of weathering and phase distribution offers a powerful tool for assessing the effects of low-temperature alteration and for identifying robust evidence for parent-body processes.

Day, JMD, Moynier F.  2014.  Evaporative fractionation of volatile stable isotopes and their bearing on the origin of the Moon. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A. 20130259   10.1098/rsta.2013.0259   Abstract

The Moon is depleted in volatile elements relative to the Earth and Mars. Low abundances of volatile elements, fractionated stable isotope ratios of S, Cl, K and Zn, high mu (238U/204Pb) and long-term Rb/Sr depletion are distinguishing features of the Moon, relative to the Earth. These geochemical characteristics indicate both inheritance of volatile-depleted materials that formed the Moon and planets and subsequent evaporative loss of volatile elements that occurred during lunar formation and differentiation. Models of volatile loss through localized eruptive degassing are not consistent with the available S, Cl, Zn and K isotopes and abundance data for the Moon. The most probable cause of volatile depletion is global-scale evaporation resulting from a giant impact or a magma ocean phase where inefficient volatile loss during magmatic convection led to the present distribution of volatile elements within mantle and crustal reservoirs. Problems exist for models of planetary volatile depletion following giant impact. Most critically, in this model, the volatile loss requires preferential delivery and retention of late-accreted volatiles to the Earth compared with the Moon. Different proportions of late-accreted mass are computed to explain present-day distributions of volatile and moderately volatile elements (e.g. Pb, Zn; 5 to >10%) relative to highly siderophile elements (approx. 0.5%) for the Earth. Models of early magma ocean phases may be more effective in explaining the volatile loss. Basaltic materials (e.g. eucrites and angrites) from highly differentiated airless asteroids are volatile-depleted, like the Moon, whereas the Earth and Mars have proportionally greater volatile contents. Parent-body size and the existence of early atmospheres are therefore likely to represent fundamental controls on planetary volatile retention or loss.

Wang, K, Day JMD, Korotev RL, Zeigler RA, Moynier F.  2014.  Iron isotope fractionation during sulfide-rich felsic partial melting in early planetesimals. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 392:124-132.   10.1016/j.epsl.2014.02.022   Abstract

New Fe isotope data of feldspar-rich meteorites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129 (GRA 06128/9) reveal that they are the only known examples of crustal materials with isotopically light Fe isotope compositions (View the MathML source; δ 56Fe is defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 56Fe/54Fe ratio from the IRMM-014 standard) in the Solar System. In contrast, associated brachinites, as well as brachinite-like achondrites, have Fe isotope compositions (View the MathML source) that are isotopically similar to carbonaceous chondrites and the bulk terrestrial mantle. In order to understand the cause of Fe isotope variations in the GRA 06128/9 and brachinite parent body, we also report the Fe isotope compositions of metal, silicate and sulfide fractions from three ordinary chondrites (Semarkona, Kernouve, Saint-Séverin). Metals from ordinary chondrites are enriched in the heavier isotopes of Fe (average View the MathML source), sulfide fractions are enriched in the lighter isotopes of Fe (average View the MathML source), and the δ 56Fe values of the silicates are coincident with that of the bulk rock (average View the MathML source).

The enrichment of light isotopes of Fe isotopes in GRA 06128/9 is consistent with preferential melting of sulfides in precursor chondritic source materials leading to the formation of Fe–S-rich felsic melts. Conceptual models show that melt generation to form a GRA 06128/9 parental melt occurred prior to the onset of higher-temperature basaltic melting (<1200 °C) in a volatile-rich precursor and led to the generation of buoyant felsic melt with a strong Fe–S signature. These models not only reveal the origin of enrichment in light isotopes of Fe for GRA 06128/9, but are also consistent with petrological and geochemical observations, experimental studies for the origin of Fe–S-rich felsic melts, and for the cessation of early melting on some asteroidal parent bodies because of the effective removal of the major radioactive heat-source, 26Al. The mode of origin for GRA 06128/9 contrasts strongly with crust formation on Earth, the Moon, Mars and other asteroids, where mantle differentiation and/or oxygen activity are the major controls on crustal Fe isotope compositions.

Day, JMD, Peters BJ, Janney PE.  2014.  Oxygen isotope systematics of South African olivine melilitites and implications for HIMU mantle reservoirs. Lithos. 202-203:76-84.   10.1016/j.lithos.2014.05.009   Abstract

Oxygen isotopes are useful tracers of silicate melt generation processes because of the relatively constant abundance of oxygen in silicate reservoirs and the large isotopic fractionation that can occur between 18O and 16O during low (< 350 °C) and high (> 350 °C) temperature alteration processes at Earth's surface. Studies of oceanic island basalts (OIB) have demonstrated the important role of assimilation of hydrothermal altered crust on 18O/16O ratios, as well as evidence that some OIB mantle sources contain recycled oceanic or continental crust and lithosphere based on correlations between oxygen and radiogenic isotopes. To further investigate how oxygen isotope signatures may be used as tracers in intraplate volcanic rocks, we report olivine compositions from South African olivine melilitites. Olivine melilitites are considered to be related to Group 1 kimberlites and form from asthenospheric melting beneath mature oceanic islands or under off-craton continental lithosphere. South African olivine melilitites also exhibit radiogenic isotopic signatures similar to high-μ (HIMU; high-238U/204Pb) OIB, suggesting sources containing subducted oceanic lithosphere. Olivine from South African melilitites has trace element compositions that are consistent with a magmatic origin from a HIMU-type mantle melt and have a remarkably restricted range in primary 18O/16O ratios (δ18O = 4.99–5.26‰; Average = 5.14 ± 0.17‰, 2σ) that are within the mantle olivine range (δ18O = 5.2 ± 0.3‰). These compositions indicate that South African olivine melilitites require a HIMU mantle source with the oxygen isotope characteristics of ambient peridotite mantle and can be explain through either: (1) intra-mantle differentiation processes that fractionate U(and Th) from Pb, but not 18O/16O ratios, or (2) a dominantly peridotitic source with HIMU-like trace-element and radiogenic isotope characteristics inherited from equilibration and remixing of ancient recycled oceanic lithosphere. In contrast, some HIMU ocean island basalts require mantle sources with low-δ18O, indicating that they originate from distinct recycled mantle lithologies (e.g., pyroxenite/eclogite).

Herzberg, C, Cabral RA, Jackson MG, Vidito C, Day JMD, Hauri EH.  2014.  Phantom Archean crust in Mangaia hotspot lavas and the meaning of heterogeneous mantle. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 396:97-106.   10.1016/j.epsl.2014.03.065   Abstract

Lavas from Mangaia in the Cook–Austral island chain, Polynesia, define an HIMU (or high μ , where View the MathML source) global isotopic end-member among ocean island basalts (OIB) with the highest 206,207,208Pb/204Pb. This geochemical signature is interpreted to reflect a recycled oceanic crust component in the mantle source. Mass independently fractionated (MIF) sulfur isotopes indicate that Mangaia lavas sampled recycled Archean material that was once at the Earth's surface, likely hydrothermally-modified oceanic crust. Recent models have proposed that crust that is subducted and then returned to the surface in a mantle plume is expected to transform to pyroxenite/eclogite during transit through the mantle. Here we examine this hypothesis for Mangaia using high-precision electron microprobe analysis on olivine phenocrysts. Contrary to expectations of a crustal component and, hence pyroxenite, results show a mixed peridotite and pyroxenite source, with peridotite dominating. If the isotopic compositions were inherited from subduction of recycled oceanic crust, our work shows that this source has phantom-like properties in that it can have its lithological identity destroyed while its isotope ratios are preserved. This may occur by partial melting of the pyroxenite and injection of its silicic melts into the surrounding mantle peridotite, yielding a refertilized peridotite. Evidence from one sample reveals that not all pyroxenite in the melting region was destroyed. Identification of source lithology using olivine phenocryst chemistry can be further compromised by magma chamber fractional crystallization, recharge, and mixing. We conclude that the commonly used terms mantle “heterogeneities” and “streaks” are ambiguous, and distinction should be made of its lithological and isotopic properties.

Cabral, RA, Jackson MG, Koga KT, Rose-Koga EF, Hauri EH, Whitehouse MJ, Price AA, Day JMD, Shimizu N, Kelley KA.  2014.  Volatile cycling of H2O, CO2, F, and Cl in the HIMU mantle: A new window provided by melt inclusions from oceanic hot spot lavas at Mangaia, Cook Islands. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. 15(11):4445-4467.   10.1002/2014GC005473   Abstract

Mangaia hosts the most radiogenic Pb-isotopic compositions observed in ocean island basalts and represents the HIMU (high m5238U/204Pb) mantle end-member, thought to result from recycled oceanic crust. Complete geochemical characterization of the HIMU mantle end-member has been inhibited due to a lack of deep submarine glass samples from HIMU localities. We homogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions separated from Mangaia lavas and the resulting glassy inclusions made possible the first volatile abundances to be obtained from the HIMU mantle end-member. We also report major and trace element abundances and Pb-isotopic ratios on the inclusions, which have HIMU isotopic fingerprints. We evaluate the samples for processes that could modify the volatile and trace element abundances postmantle melting, including diffusive Fe and H2O loss, degassing, and assimilation. H2O/Ce ratios vary from 119 to 245 in the most pristine Mangaia inclusions; excluding an inclusion that shows evidence for assimilation, the primary magmatic H2O/Ce ratios vary up to 200, and are consistent with significant dehydration of oceanic crust during subduction and long-term storage in the mantle. CO2 concentrations range up to 2346 ppm CO2 in the inclusions. Relatively high CO2 in the inclusions, combined with previous observations of carbonate blebs in other Mangaia melt inclusions, highlight the importance of CO2 for the generation of the HIMU mantle. F/Nd ratios in the inclusions (3069; 2r standard deviation) are higher than the canonical ratio observed in oceanic lavas, and Cl/K ratios (0.07960.028) fall in the range of pristine mantle (0.02–0.08).

2013
Day, JMD.  2013.  Hotspot volcanism and highly siderophile elements. Chemical Geology. 341:50-74.   10.1016/j.chemgeo.2012.12.010   AbstractWebsite

Hotspot volcanic rocks are formed under conditions that differ from conventional plate tectonic boundary magmatic processes and are compositionally distinct from mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Hotspot volcanic rocks include - but are not limited to - ocean island basalts (OIB), continental flood basalts (CFB), komatiites, oceanic plateau and some intraplate alkaline volcanic rocks. Studies of the highly siderophile element (HSE) geochemistry of hotspot volcanic rocks have provided new perspectives into mantle convection, mantle heterogeneity, core-mantle interactions, crustal and mantle lithospheric recycling, melting processes and crust-mantle interactions. The HSE, comprising Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Re and Au, have strong affinities for metal and sulphide relative to silicate. These elements also have variable partitioning behaviour between highly compatible Os, Ir, Ru and Rh relative to compatible Pt and Pd and to moderately incompatible Re and Au during melting and crysta! The HSE can be utilised to understand sub-aerial volcanic degassing and crustal assimilation processes in hotspot volcanic rocks such as CFB and OIB, as well as for quantitative assessment of fractional crystallisation. Mantle melting studies have highlighted the strong control of sulphide in the mantle prior to exhaustion of S and generation of Os Ir Ru metal alloys at similar to>25% partial melting; a behaviour of the HSE that is fundamental to understanding terrestrial hotspot volcanism. Perhaps the most exciting utility of the HSE, however, lies in their ability to reveal both short- and long-term fractionation processes acting on hotspot volcanic sources from inter-element HSE fractionations and Os-187/Os-188-Os-186/Os-188 systematics. The growing database for HSE abundances and Os-187/Os-188 in hotspot volcanic rocks is consistent with their generation from a heterogeneous upper mantle generated by melt differentiation and recycling of crust and mantle lithosphere d! The HSE provide geochemical evidence for how lithological and chemical heterogeneities are sampled within the mantle. Modeling of HSE abundances and Os isotopes show that large apparent recycled contributions (50% to 90%) in some OIB can be explained by the preferential melting of volumetrically minor (<10%) pyroxenite in their sources. Preferential melting of more fusible materials in the mantle also explains why low-degree partial melts, such as alkali basalts and basanites, may exhibit more extreme isotopic variations than tholeiites or komatiites, which likely contain a higher contribution from peridotite in a hybridised pyroxenite-peridotite mantle source. High-precision Os-188/Os-188 data for hotspot volcanism are limited, but the combined variations in long-term Re/Os and Pt/Os retained in some mantle sources may reflect either the long-term fractionation of Re and Pt from Os between the inner and outer core, or ancient sulphide segregation and lithological variati! Study of the HSE in hotspot volcanic rocks from Solar System bodies also informs on planetary-scale processes, indicating that Earth, the Moon, Mars and fully differentiated asteroids all have HSE abundances in their mantles that are higher than expected from low-pressure metal-silicate partitioning. Furthermore, the HSE are in broadly chondritic-relative abundances for these planetary bodies, at similar to 0.0002 (Moon), to similar to 0.007 (Mars), to similar to 0.009 (Earth) x carbonaceous chondrite Ivuna (CI) composition. The timing of addition of the HSE to planetary bodies preserved in their magmas and volcanic products is consistent with Solar-System-wide late accretion no later than 3.8 Ga for Earth, and even earlier based on evidence from the Moon (similar to 4.4 Ga), Mars (similar to 4.5 Ga) and asteroids (>4.56 Ga). (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.DELMON.A, 1972, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, V272, P805

Cabral, RA, Jackson MG, Rose-Koga EF, Koga KT, Whitehouse MJ, Antonelli MA, Farquhar J, Day JMD, Hauri EH.  2013.  Anomalous sulphur isotopes in plume lavas reveal deep mantle storage of Archaean crust. Nature. 496:490-+.   10.1038/nature12020   AbstractWebsite

Basaltic lavas erupted at some oceanic intraplate hotspot volcanoes are thought to sample ancient subducted crustal materials(1,2). However, the residence time of these subducted materials in the mantle is uncertain and model-dependent(3), and compelling evidence for their return to the surface in regions of mantle upwelling beneath hotspots is lacking. Here we report anomalous sulphur isotope signatures indicating mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in olivine-hosted sulphides from 20-million-year-old ocean island basalts from Mangaia, Cook Islands (Polynesia), which have been suggested to sample recycled oceanic crust(3,4). Terrestrial MIF sulphur isotope signatures (in which the amount of fractionation does not scale in proportion with the difference in the masses of the isotopes) were generated exclusively through atmospheric photochemical reactions until about 2.45 billion years ago(5-7). Therefore, the discovery of MIF sulphur in these young plume lavas suggests that sulphur-probably derived from hydrothermally altered oceanic crust-was subducted into the mantle before 2.45 billion years ago and recycled into the mantle source of Mangaia lavas. These new data provide evidence for ancient materials, with negative Delta S-33 values, in the mantle source for Mangaia lavas. Our data also complement evidence for recycling of the sulphur content of ancient sedimentary materials to the subcontinental lithospheric mantle that has been identified in diamond-hosted sulphide inclusions(8,9). This Archaean age for recycled oceanic crust also provides key constraints on the length of time that subducted crustal material can survive in the mantle, and on the timescales of mantle convection from subduction to upwelling beneath hotspots.

Day, JMD, Pearson GD, Hulbert LJ.  2013.  Highly siderophile element behaviour during flood basalt genesis and evidence for melts from intrusive chromitite formation in the Mackenzie large igneous province. Lithos. 182-183:242-258.   http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lithos.2013.10.011   Abstract

The 1.27 Ga Coppermine continental flood basalt (CFB) province in northern Canada represents the extrusive manifestation of the 2.7 Mkm2 Mackenzie large igneous province (LIP) that includes the Mackenzie dyke swarm and the Muskox layered intrusion. New Re–Os isotope and highly siderophile element (HSE: Re, Pd, Pt, Ru, Ir, Os) abundance data are reported together with whole-rock major- and trace-element abundances and Nd isotopes to examine the behaviour of the HSE during magmatic differentiation and to place constraints on the extent of crustal interaction with mantle-derived melts. Mineral chemistry and petrography are also reported for an unusual andesite glass flow (CM19; 4.9 wt.% MgO) found in close proximity to newly recognised picrites (> 20 wt.% MgO) in the lowermost stratigraphy of the Coppermine CFB. Compositions of mineral phases in CM19 are similar to the same phases found in Muskox Intrusion chromitites and the melt composition is equivalent to inclusions trapped within Muskox chromites. The apparently conflicting elevated HSE contents (e.g., 3.8 ppb Os) and mantle-like initial 187Os/188Os (γOs = + 2.2), versus stable isotope (δ18O = + 12‰) and lithophile element evidence (εNdi = − 12.8) for extensive crustal contamination, implicate an origin for CM19 as a magma mingling product formed within the Muskox Intrusion during chromitite genesis. Combined with Nd isotope data that places the feeder for lower Coppermine CFB picrites and basalts within the Muskox Intrusion, this result provides compelling evidence for direct processing of some CFB within upper-crustal magma chambers. The Coppermine CFB defines a 187Re–187Os isochron with an age of 1263 + 16/− 20 Ma and initial γOs = + 2.2 ± 0.8. The initial Os isotope composition for the Coppermine CFB is slightly higher than the near-primitive-mantle initial 187Os/188Os for the Muskox Intrusion (γOs = + 1.2 ± 0.3). This result is interpreted to reflect greater crustal contamination in extrusive CFB and the sensitivity of Os isotopes, compared with absolute HSE concentrations, for tracking crustal contributions.

Modelling of absolute and relative HSE abundances in global CFB reveals that HSE concentrations decrease with increasing fractionation for melts with < 8 ± 1 wt.% MgO, with picrites (> 13.5 wt.% MgO) from CFB (n = 98; 1.97 ± 1.77 ppb) having higher Os abundances than ocean island basalt (OIB) equivalents (n = 75; 0.95 ± 0.86 ppb). The differences between CFB and OIB picrite absolute Os abundances may result from higher degrees of partial melting to form CFB but may also reflect incorporation of trace sulphide in CFB picrites from magmas that reached S-saturation in upper-crustal magma chambers. Significant inter-element fractionation of (Re + Pt + Pd)/(Os + Ir + Ru) are generated during magmatic differentiation in response to strongly contrasting partitioning of these two groups of elements into sulphides and/or HSE-rich alloys. Furthermore, fractional crystallization has a greater role on absolute and relative HSE abundances than crustal contamination under conditions of CFB petrogenesis due to the dilution effect of continental crust, which has low total abundances of the HSE. Combined data for the basaltic and intrusive portions of the Mackenzie LIP indicate a mantle source broadly within the range of the primitive upper mantle. The majority of Archaean komatiites and Phanerozoic CFB also require mantle sources with primitive upper mantle to chondritic Re/Os evolution, with exceptions typically being from analyses of highly-fractionated MgO-poor basalts.

2012
Day, JMD, Walker RJ, Qin LP, Rumble D.  2012.  Late accretion as a natural consequence of planetary growth. Nature Geoscience. 5:614-617.   10.1038/ngeo1527   AbstractWebsite

Core formation should strip highly siderophile elements (HSEs) from planetary mantles according to the expected metal-silicate partitioncoefficients(1,2). However, studies of Earth(3), the Moon(4) and Mars(5) indicate mantles with HSE abundances in chondrite-relative proportions that exceed the values expected from metal-silicate partitioning. Competing hypotheses have been proposed to account for these observations, including metal-silicate partitioning at higher pressures and temperatures(6) and late accretion(7). Here we present petrological and geochemical analyses of diogenite meteorites that represent mantle and crustal materials from two or more differentiated asteroids. We find that diogenites show HSE abundances that are consistent with metal-silicate equilibration, followed by minor continued accretion. Isotope chronometry supports diogenite crystallization ages within 2-3 million years of Solar System formation, indicating that late accretion occurred earlier than postulated for Earth, the Moon and Mars. The early timing and occurrence on differentiated asteroids, as well as on the larger terrestrial planets, therefore ties late accretion to planetary growth. On asteroidal bodies, such as the diogenite parent bodies, variations in HSE compositions may reflect regional rather than global effects. In contrast, for Earth, the Moon and Mars, compositional variations in mantle materials seem to be consistent with more homogeneous distributions through prolonged melting and/or solid-state convection.

Paniello, RC, Day JMD, Moynier F.  2012.  Zinc isotopic evidence for the origin of the Moon. Nature. 490:376-U104.   10.1038/nature11507   AbstractWebsite

Volatile elements have a fundamental role in the evolution of planets. But how budgets of volatiles were set in planets, and the nature and extent of volatile-depletion of planetary bodies during the earliest stages of Solar System formation remain poorly understood(1,2). The Moon is considered to be volatile-depleted and so it has been predicted that volatile loss should have fractionated stable isotopes of moderately volatile elements(3). One such element, zinc, exhibits strong isotopic fractionation during volatilization in planetary rocks(4,5), but is hardly fractionated during terrestrial igneous processes(6), making it a powerful tracer of the volatile histories of planets. Here we present high-precision zinc isotopic and abundance data which show that lunar magmatic rocks are enriched in the heavy isotopes of zinc and have lower zinc concentrations than terrestrial or Martian igneous rocks. Conversely, Earth and Mars have broadly chondritic zinc isotopic compositions. We show that these variations represent large-scale evaporation of zinc, most probably in the aftermath of the Moon-forming event, rather than small-scale evaporation processes during volcanism. Our results therefore represent evidence for volatile depletion of the Moon through evaporation, and are consistent with a giant impact origin for the Earth and Moon.

Day, JMD, Walker RJ, Ash RD, Liu Y, Rumble D, Irving AJ, Goodrich CA, Tait K, McDonough WF, Taylor LA.  2012.  Origin of felsic achondrites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129, and ultramafic brachinites and brachinite-like achondrites by partial melting of volatile-rich primitive parent bodies. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 81:94-128.   10.1016/j.gca.2011.12.017   AbstractWebsite

New major- and trace-element abundances, highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) abundances, and oxygen and rhenium-osmium isotope data are reported for oligoclase-rich meteorites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129 (GRA 06128/9), six brachinites (Brachina; Elephant Morraine 99402/7; Northwest Africa (NWA) 1500; NWA 3151; NWA 4872; NWA 4882) and three olivine-rich achondrites, which are referred to here as brachinite-like achondrites (NWA 5400; NWA 6077; Zag (b)). GRA 06128/9 represent examples of felsic and highly-sodic melt products from an asteroid that may provide a differentiation complement to brachinites and/or brachinite-like achondrites. The new data, together with our petrological observations, are consistent with derivation of GRA 06128/9, brachinites and the three brachinite-like achondrites from nominally volatile-rich and oxidised 'chondritic' precursor sources within their respective parent bodies. Furthermore, the range of Delta O-17 values (similar to 0 parts per thousand to -0.3 parts per thousand) among the meteorites indicates generation from isotopically heterogeneous sources that never completely melted, or isotopically homogenised. It is possible to generate major-and trace-element compositions similar to brachinites and the three studied brachinite-like achondrites as residues of moderate degrees (13-30%) of partial melting of primitive chondritic sources. This process was coupled with inefficient removal of silica-saturated, high Fe/Mg felsic melts with compositions similar to GRA 06128/9. Melting of the parent bodies of GRA 06128/9, brachinites and brachinite-like achondrites halted well before extensive differentiation, possibly due to the exhaustion of the short-lived radionuclide Al-26 by felsic melt segregation. This mechanism provides a potential explanation for the cessation of run-away melting in asteroids to preserve achondrites such as GRA 06128/9, brachinites, brachinite-like achondrites, acapulcoite-lodranites, ureilites and aubrites. Moderate degrees of partial melting of chondritic material and generation of Fe-Ni-S-bearing melts are generally consistent with HSE abundances that are within factors of similar to 2-10 x CI-chondrite abundances for GRA 06128/9, brachinites and the three brachinite-like achondrites. However, in detail, brachinite-like achondrites NWA 5400, NWA 6077 and Zag (b) are interpreted to have witnessed single-stage S-rich metal segregation, whereas HSE in GRA 06128/9 and brachinites have more complex heritages. The HSE compositions of GRA 06128/9 and brachinites require either: (1) multiple phases in the residue (e. g., metal and sulphide); (2) fractionation after generation of an initial melt, again involving multiple phases; (3) fractional fusion, or; (4) a parent body with non-chondritic relative HSE abundances. Petrological and geochemical observations permit genetic links (i.e., same parent body) between GRA 06128/9 and brachinites and similar formation mechanisms for brachinites and brachinite-like achondrites. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Day, JMD, Macpherson CG, Lowry D, Pearson DG.  2012.  Oxygen isotope heterogeneity of the mantle beneath the Canary Islands: a discussion of the paper of Gurenko et al. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. 164:177-183.   10.1007/s00410-012-0755-3   AbstractWebsite

Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) report laser-assisted fluorination (LF) and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) O-18/O-16 datasets for olivine grains from the Canary Islands of Gran Canaria, Tenerife, La Gomera, La Palma and El Hierro. As with prior studies of oxygen isotopes in Canary Island lavas (e.g. Thirlwall et al. Chem Geol 135:233-262, 1997; Day et al. Geology 37:555-558, 2009, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010), these authors find variations in delta O-18(ol) (similar to 4.6-6.0 aEuro degrees) beyond that measured for mantle peridotite olivine (Mattey et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 128:231-241, 1994) and interpret this variation to reflect contributions from pyroxenite-peridotite mantle sources. Furthermore, Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) speculate that delta O-18(ol) values for La Palma olivine grains measured by LF (Day et al. Geology 37:555-558, 2009, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010) may be biased to low values due to the presence of altered silicate, possibly serpentine. The range in delta O-18(ol) values for Canary Island lavas are of importance for constraining their origin. Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) took a subset (39 SIMS analyses from 13 grains from a single El Hierro lava; EH4) of a more extensive dataset (321 SIMS analyses from 110 grains from 16 Canary Island lavas) to suggest that delta O-18(ol) is weakly correlated (R (2) = 0.291) with the parameter used by Gurenko et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 277:514-524, 2009) to describe the estimated weight fraction of pyroxenite-derived melt (Xpx). With this relationship, end-member delta O-18 values for HIMU-peridotite (delta O-18 = 5.3 +/- A 0.3 aEuro degrees) and depleted pyroxenite (delta O-18 = 5.9 +/- A 0.3 aEuro degrees) were defined. Although the model proposed by Gurenko et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011) implicates similar pyroxenite-peridotite mantle sources to those proposed by Day et al. (Geology 37:555-558, 2009, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010) and Day and Hilton (Earth Planet Sci Lett 305:226-234, 2011), there are significant differences in the predicted delta O-18 values of end member components in the two models. In particular, Day et al. (Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74:6565-6589, 2010) proposed a mantle source for La Palma lavas with low-delta O-18 (< 5 aEuro degrees), rather than higher-delta O-18 (c.f. the HIMU-peridotite composition of Gurenko et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol 162:349-363, 2011). Here we question the approach of using weakly correlated variations in delta O-18(ol) and the Xpx parameter to define mantle source oxygen isotope compositions, and provide examples of why this approach appears flawed. We also provide reasons why the LF datasets previously published for Canary Island lavas remain robust and discuss why LF and SIMS data may provide complementary information on oxygen isotope variations in ocean island basalts (OIB), despite unresolved small-scale uncertainties associated with both techniques.

Brandon, AD, Puchtel IS, Walker RJ, Day JMD, Irving AJ, Taylor LA.  2012.  Evolution of the martian mantle inferred from the Re-187-Os-187 isotope and highly siderophile element abundance systematics of shergottite meteorites. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 76:206-235.   10.1016/j.gca.2011.09.047   AbstractWebsite

Shergottite meteorites are a suite of mafic to ultramafic igneous rocks whose parental magmas probably derived from the martian mantle. In this study, a suite of 23 shergottites, spanning their known range in bulk compositions, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf isotopes, were measured for Re-187-Os-187 isotopic systematics and highly siderophile element abundances (HSE: including Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re). The chief objective was to gain new insight on the chemical evolution of the martian mantle by unraveling the long-term HSE budget of its derivative melts. Possible effects upon HSEs related to crustal contamination, as well as terrestrial and/or martian surface alteration are also examined. Some of the shergottites are hot arid-desert finds. Their respective acetic acid leachates and residues show that both Re and Os display open-system behavior during sample residence at or near the martian and/or terrestrial surfaces. In some meteorites, the alteration effects can be circumvented by analysis of the leached residues. For those shergottites believed to record robust Re-Os isotopic systematics, calculated initial Os-187/Os-188 are well correlated with the initial Nd-143/Nd-144. Shergottites from mantle sources with long-term melt-depleted characteristics (initial epsilon Nd-143 of + 36 to + 40) have chondritic initial gamma Os-187 ranging from -0.5 to + 2.5. Shergottites with intermediate initial epsilon Nd-143 of + 8 to + 17 have a range in initial gamma Os-187 of -0.6 to + 2.3, which overlaps the range for depleted shergottites. Shergottites from long-term enriched sources, with initial epsilon Nd-143 of similar to-7, are characterized by suprachondritic gamma Os-187 values of + 5 to + 15. The initial gamma Os-187 variations for the shergottites do not show a correlation with indices of magmatic differentiation, such as MgO, or any systematic differences between hot arid-desert finds, Antarctic finds, or observed falls. The strong correlation between the initial epsilon Nd-143 and gamma Os-187 in shergottites from approximately + 40 and 0 to -7 and + 15, respectively, is assessed in models for mixing depleted mantle-derived melts with ancient crust (modeled to be similar to evolved shergottite in composition), and with assimilation-fractional crystallization. These models show that the correlation is unlikely to result from participation of martian crust. More likely, this correlation relates to contributions from depleted and enriched reservoirs formed in a martian magma ocean at ca. 4.5 Ga. These models indicate that the shergottite endmember sources were generated by mixing between residual melts and cumulates that formed at variable stages during solidification of a magma ocean. The expanded database for the HSE abundances in shergottites suggests that their martian mantle sources have similar HSE abundances to the terrestrial mantle, consistent with prior studies. The relatively high HSE abundances in both planetary mantles likely cannot be accounted for by high pressure-temperature metal-silicate partitioning at the bases of magma oceans, as has been suggested for Earth. If the HSE were instead supplied by late accretion, this event must have occurred prior to the crystallization of the last martian magma ocean. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

O'Driscoll, B, Day JMD, Walker RJ, Daly JS, McDonough WF, Piccoli PM.  2012.  Chemical heterogeneity in the upper mantle recorded by peridotites and chromitites from the Shetland Ophiolite Complex, Scotland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 333:226-237.   10.1016/j.epsl.2012.03.035   Abstract

The timing, causes and extent of mantle heterogeneity preserved in the ∼492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex (Scotland) are evaluated using Re–Os isotope and whole rock highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) abundance measurements of a suite of eight chromitites and 21 serpentinised harzburgites and dunites. Shetland dunites have more variable initial 187Os/188Os, as well as absolute and relative abundances of the HSE, compared to spatially associated harzburgites. As is common for ophiolitic peridotites, the harzburgites (γOs492Ma of −5.3 to +2.6) preserve evidence for a Mesoproterozoic depletion event, but are dominated by contemporary chondritic, ambient upper mantle compositions. The dunites have γOs492Ma values ranging between −3.3 and +12.4, reflecting dunite formation by higher degrees of melt interaction with mantle rock than for the spatially associated harzburgites.

Chromitite seams from three locations separated by <500 m have a large range in HSE concentrations (e.g., 0.09 to ∼2.9 μg g−1 Os) with initial γOs492Ma values ranging only from +0.48 to +3.95. Sulphides, arsenides and platinum-group minerals are the primary hosts for the HSE in the chromitites. Their isotopic variations reflect initial isotopic heterogeneity in their primary magmatic signatures. Coupled with field observations that support chromitite formation in concentrated zones of enhanced melt flow, the isotopic dichotomy between the harzburgites and the chromitites suggests that chromitite 187Os/188Os compositions may better approximate the upper limit, rather than an average value, of the bulk convecting upper mantle.

The Shetland peridotite compositions reflect protracted melt depletion (low-Al2O3) and melt percolation events in a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) setting at ∼492 Ma, following an earlier (Mesoproterozoic) melt-depletion event. These results provide further evidence that ancient chemical complexities can be preserved in the upper mantle during ocean plate formation. Chromitites and peridotites from the Shetland Ophiolite Complex also attest to lithological and geochemical heterogeneities generated at scales of less than tens of metres during the formation of ancient oceanic lithosphere by high-degree SSZ melt extraction, percolation and during chromitite formation in the oceanic lithosphere.

Filiberto, J, Chin E, Day JMD, Franchi IA, Greenwood RC, Gross J, Penniston-Dorland SC, Schwenzer SP, Treiman AH.  2012.  Geochemistry of intermediate olivine-phyric shergottite northwest Africa 6234, with similarities to basaltic shergottite northwest Africa 480 and olivine-phyric shergottite northwest Africa 2990. Meteoritics and Planetary Science. 47(8):1256-1273.   10.1111/j.1945-5100.2012.01382.x   Abstract

The newly found meteorite Northwest Africa 6234 (NWA 6234) is an olivine (ol)-phyric shergottite that is thought, based on texture and mineralogy, to be paired with Martian shergottite meteorites NWA 2990, 5960, and 6710. We report bulk-rock major- and trace-element abundances (including Li), abundances of highly siderophile elements, Re-Os isotope systematics, oxygen isotope ratios, and the lithium isotope ratio for NWA 6234. NWA 6234 is classified as a Martian shergottite, based on its oxygen isotope ratios, bulk composition, and bulk element abundance ratios, Fe/Mn, Al/Ti, and Na/Al. The Li concentration and δ7Li value of NWA 6234 are similar to that of basaltic shergottites Zagami and Shergotty. The rare earth element (REE) pattern for NWA 6234 shows a depletion in the light REE (La-Nd) compared with the heavy REE (Sm-Lu), but not as extreme as the known “depleted” shergottites. Thus, NWA 6234 is suggested to belong to a new category of shergottite that is geochemically “intermediate” in incompatible elements. The only other basaltic or ol-phyric shergottite with a similar “intermediate” character is the basaltic shergottite NWA 480. Rhenium-osmium isotope systematics are consistent with this intermediate character, assuming a crystallization age of 180 Ma. We conclude that NWA 6234 represents an intermediate compositional group between enriched and depleted shergottites and offers new insights into the nature of mantle differentiation and mixing among mantle reservoirs in Mars.

Moynier, F, Day JMD, Okui W, Yokoyama T, Bouvier A, Walker RJ, Podosek FA.  2012.  Planetary-Scale Strontium Isotopic Heterogeneity and the Age of Volatile Depletion of Early Solar System Materials. The Astrophysical Journal. 758(1):45.   doi:10.1088/0004-637X/758/1/45   Abstract

Isotopic anomalies in planetary materials reflect both early solar nebular heterogeneity inherited from presolar stellar sources and processes that generated non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionations. The characterization of isotopic variations in heavy elements among early solar system materials yields important insight into the stellar environment and formation of the solar system, and about initial isotopic ratios relevant to long-term chronological applications. One such heavy element, strontium, is a central element in the geosciences due to wide application of the long-lived 87Rb-87Sr radioactive as a chronometer. We show that the stable isotopes of Sr were heterogeneously distributed at both the mineral scale and the planetary scale in the early solar system, and also that the Sr isotopic heterogeneities correlate with mass-independent oxygen isotope variations, with only CI chondrites plotting outside of this correlation. The correlation implies that most solar system material formed by mixing of at least two isotopically distinct components: a CV-chondrite-like component and an O-chondrite-like component, and possibly a distinct CI-chondrite-like component. The heterogeneous distribution of Sr isotopes may indicate that variations in initial 87Sr/86Sr of early solar system materials reflect isotopic heterogeneity instead of having chronological significance, as interpreted previously. For example, given the differences in 84Sr/86Sr between calcium aluminum inclusions and eucrites (ε84Sr > 2), the difference in age between these materials would be ~6 Ma shorter than previously interpreted, placing the Sr chronology in agreement with other long- and short-lived isotope systems, such as U-Pb and Mn-Cr.

Riches, AJV, Day JMD, Walker RJ, Simonetti A, Liu Y, Neal CR, Taylor LA.  2012.  Rhenium–osmium isotope and highly-siderophile-element abundance systematics of angrite meteorites. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 353:208-218.   10.1016/j.epsl.2012.08.006   Abstract

Coupled 187Os/188Os compositions and highly-siderophile-element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) abundance data are reported for eight angrite achondrite meteorites that include quenched- and slowly-cooled textural types. These data are combined with new major- and trace-element concentrations determined for bulk-rock powder fractions and constituent mineral phases, to assess angrite petrogenesis. Angrite meteorites span a wide-range of HSE abundances from <0.005 ppb Os (e.g., Northwest Africa [NWA] 1296; Angra dos Reis) to >100 ppb Os (NWA 4931). Chondritic to supra-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1201–0.2127) measured for Angra dos Reis and quenched-angrites correspond to inter- and intra-sample heterogeneities in Re/Os and HSE abundances. Quenched-angrites have chondritic-relative rare-earth-element (REE) abundances at 10–15×CI-chondrite, and their Os-isotope and HSE abundance variations represent mixtures of pristine uncontaminated crustal materials that experienced addition (<0.8%) of exogenous chondritic materials during or after crystallization. Slowly-cooled angrites (NWA 4590 and NWA 4801) have fractionated REE-patterns, chondritic to sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1056–0.1195), as well as low-Re/Os (0.03–0.13), Pd/Os (0.071–0.946), and relatively low-Pt/Os (0.792–2.640). Sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os compositions in NWA 4590 and NWA 4801 are unusual amongst planetary basalts, and their HSE and REE characteristics may be linked to melting of mantle sources that witnessed prior basaltic melt depletion. Angrite HSE-Yb systematics suggest that the HSE behaved moderately-incompatibly during angrite magma crystallization, implying the presence of metal in the crystallizing assemblage.

The new HSE abundance and 187Os/188Os compositions indicate that the silicate mantle of the angrite parent body(ies) (APB) had HSE abundances in chondritic-relative proportions but at variable abundances at the time of angrite crystallization. The HSE systematics of angrites are consistent with protracted post-core formation accretion of materials with chondritic-relative abundances of HSE to the APB, and these accreted materials were rapidly, yet inefficiently, mixed into angrite magma source regions early in Solar System history.

2011
Sarbadhikari, AB, Goodrich CA, Liu Y, Day JMD, Taylor LA.  2011.  Evidence for heterogeneous enriched shergottite mantle sources in Mars from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Larkman Nunatak 06319. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 75:6803-6820.   10.1016/j.gca.2011.09.001   AbstractWebsite

Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 is an olivine-phyric shergottite whose olivine crystals contain abundant crystallized melt inclusions. In this study, three types of melt inclusion were distinguished, based on their occurrence and the composition of their olivine host: Type-I inclusions occur in phenocryst cores (Fo(77-73)); Type-II inclusions occur in phenocryst mantles (Fo(71-66)); Type-III inclusions occur in phenocryst rims (Fo(61-51)) and within groundmass olivine. The sizes of the melt inclusions decrease significantly from Type-I (similar to 150-250 mu m diameter) to Type-II (similar to 100 mu m diameter) to Type-III (similar to 25-75 mu m diameter). Present bulk compositions (PBC) of the crystallized melt inclusions were calculated for each of the three melt inclusion types based on average modal abundances and analyzed compositions of constituent phases. Primary trapped liquid compositions were then reconstructed by addition of olivine and adjustment of the Fe/Mg ratio to equilibrium with the host olivine (to account for crystallization of wall olivine and the effects of Fe/Mg re-equilibration). The present bulk composition of Type-I inclusions (PBC1) plots on a tie-line that passes through olivine and the LAR 06319 whole-rock composition. The parent magma composition can be reconstructed by addition of 29 mol% olivine to PBC1, and adjustment of Fe/Mg for equilibrium with olivine of Fo(77) composition. The resulting parent magma composition has a predicted crystallization sequence that is consistent with that determined from petrographic observations, and differs significantly from the whole-rock only in an accumulated olivine component (similar to 10 wt%). This is consistent with a calculation indicating that similar to 10 wt% agnesian (Fo(77-73)) olivine must be subtracted from the whole-rock to yield a melt in equilibrium with Fo(77). Thus, two independent estimates indicate that LAR 06319 contains similar to 10 wt% cumulate olivine. The rare earth element (REE) patterns of Type-I melt inclusions are similar to that of the LAR 06319 whole-rock. The REE patterns of Type-II and Type-III melt inclusions are also broadly parallel to that of the whole-rock, but at higher absolute abundances. These results are consistent with an LAR 06319 parent magma that crystallized as a closed-system, with its incompatible-element enrichment being inherited from its mantle source region. However, fractional crystallization of the reconstructed LAR 06319 parent magma cannot reproduce the major and trace element characteristics of all enriched basaltic shergottites, indicating local-to-large scale major-and trace-element variations in the mantle source of enriched shergottites. Therefore, LAR 06319 cannot be parental to the enriched basaltic shergottites. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Day, JMD, Hilton DR.  2011.  Origin of (3)He/(4)He ratios in HIMU-type basalts constrained from Canary Island lavas. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 305:226-234.   10.1016/j.epsl.2011.03.006   AbstractWebsite

New helium isotope and abundance measurements are reported for olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts from HIMU-type (high-mu=elevated (238)U/(204)Pb) lavas and xenoliths spanning the stratigraphies of El Hierro and La Palma, Canary Islands. Some pyroxene phenocrysts have suffered post-eruptive modification, either by less than 1% assimilation of crustal-derived He, or by closed-system ageing of He. Olivine phenocrysts record mantle source (3)He/(4)He compositions, with the average (3)He/(4)He for La Palma olivine (7.6 +/- 0.8R(A), where R(A) is the atmospheric (3)He/(4)He ratio of 1.38 x 10(-6)) being within uncertainty of those for El Hierro (7.7 +/- 0.3R(A)), and the canonical mid-ocean ridge basalt range (MORB: 8 +/- 1R(A)). The new helium isotope data for El Hierro and La Palma show no distinct correlations with whole-rock (87)Sr/(86)Sr, (143)Nd/(144)Nd, (187)Os/(188)Os, or Pb isotopes, but (3)He/(4)He ratios for La Palma lavas correlate with (18)O/(16)O measured for the same phenocryst populations. Despite limited (3)He/(4)He variations for El Hierro and La Palma, their He-O isotope systematics are consistent with derivation from mantle sources containing distinct recycled oceanic basaltic crust (El Hierro) and gabbroic lithosphere (La Palma) components that have mixed with depleted mantle, and a high-(3)He/(4)He component (>9.7R(A)) in the case of La Palma. The new data are consistent with models involving generation of compositionally and lithologically (e.g., pyroxenite, eclogite, peridotite) heterogeneous mantle sources containing recycled oceanic crust and lithosphere entrained within upwelling high-(3)He/(4)He mantle that has been severely diluted by interaction with depleted mantle. We propose that the noble gas systematics of HIMU-type lavas and ocean island basalts (OIB) in general, are most simply interpreted as being controlled by the most gas-rich reservoir involved in mixing to generate their mantle sources. In this scenario, HIMU and enriched mantle (EM) sources are dominated by depleted mantle, or high-(3)He/(4)He mantle, because recycled crust and lithosphere have low He concentrations. Consequently, high-(3)He/(4)He OIB would predominantly reflect derivation from a less depleted mantle source with sub-equal to higher He contents than depleted mantle. The available coupled He-O isotope systematics measured for OIB lavas are consistent with this hypothesis. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.