Publications

Export 3 results:
Sort by: Author [ Title  (Asc)] Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U [V] W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
V
Cabral, RA, Jackson MG, Koga KT, Rose-Koga EF, Hauri EH, Whitehouse MJ, Price AA, Day JMD, Shimizu N, Kelley KA.  2014.  Volatile cycling of H2O, CO2, F, and Cl in the HIMU mantle: A new window provided by melt inclusions from oceanic hot spot lavas at Mangaia, Cook Islands. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. 15(11):4445-4467.   10.1002/2014GC005473   Abstract

Mangaia hosts the most radiogenic Pb-isotopic compositions observed in ocean island basalts and represents the HIMU (high m5238U/204Pb) mantle end-member, thought to result from recycled oceanic crust. Complete geochemical characterization of the HIMU mantle end-member has been inhibited due to a lack of deep submarine glass samples from HIMU localities. We homogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions separated from Mangaia lavas and the resulting glassy inclusions made possible the first volatile abundances to be obtained from the HIMU mantle end-member. We also report major and trace element abundances and Pb-isotopic ratios on the inclusions, which have HIMU isotopic fingerprints. We evaluate the samples for processes that could modify the volatile and trace element abundances postmantle melting, including diffusive Fe and H2O loss, degassing, and assimilation. H2O/Ce ratios vary from 119 to 245 in the most pristine Mangaia inclusions; excluding an inclusion that shows evidence for assimilation, the primary magmatic H2O/Ce ratios vary up to 200, and are consistent with significant dehydration of oceanic crust during subduction and long-term storage in the mantle. CO2 concentrations range up to 2346 ppm CO2 in the inclusions. Relatively high CO2 in the inclusions, combined with previous observations of carbonate blebs in other Mangaia melt inclusions, highlight the importance of CO2 for the generation of the HIMU mantle. F/Nd ratios in the inclusions (3069; 2r standard deviation) are higher than the canonical ratio observed in oceanic lavas, and Cl/K ratios (0.07960.028) fall in the range of pristine mantle (0.02–0.08).

Day, JMD, Sossi PA, Shearer CK, Moynier F.  2019.  Volatile distributions in and on the Moon revealed by Cu and Fe isotopes in the ‘Rusty Rock’ 66095. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta.   10.1016/j.gca.2019.02.036   Abstract

The Apollo 16 ‘Rusty Rock’ impact melt breccia 66095 is a volatile-rich sample, with the volatiles inherited through vapor condensation from an internal lunar source formed during thermo-magmatic evolution of the Moon. We report Cu and Fe isotope data for 66095 and find that bulk-rocks, residues and acid leaches span a relatively limited range of compositions (3.0 ±1.3 wt.% FeO [range = 2.0-4.8 wt.%], 5.4 ±3.1 ppm Cu [range = 3-12 ppm], average δ56Fe of 0.15 ± 0.05‰ [weighted mean = 0.16‰] and δ65Cu of 0.72 ± 0.14‰ [weighted mean = 0.78‰]). In contrast to the extreme enrichment of light isotopes of Zn and heavy isotopes of Cl in 66095, δ65Cu and δ56Fe in the sample lie within the previously reported range for lunar mare basalts (0.92 ± 0.16‰ and 0.12 ± 0.02‰, respectively). The lack of extreme isotopic fractionation for Cu and Fe isotopes reflects compositions inherent to 66095, with condensation of a cooling gas from impact-generated fumarolic activity at temperatures too low to lead to the condensation of Cu and Fe, but higher than required to condense Zn. Together with thermodynamic models, these constraints suggest that the gas condensed within 66095 between 700 and 900 °C (assuming a pressure of 10-6 and an fO2 of IW-2). That the Cu and Fe isotopic compositions of sample 66095 are within the range of mare basalts removes the need for an exotic, volatile-enriched source. The enrichment in Tl, Br, Cd, Sn, Zn, Pb, Rb, Cs, Ga, B, Cl, Li relative to Bi, Se, Te, Ge, Cu, Ag, Sb, Mn, P, Cr and Fe in the ‘Rusty Rock’ is consistent with volcanic outgassing models and indicates that 66095 likely formed distal from the original source of the gas. The volatile-rich character of 66095 is consistent with impact-generated fumarolic activity in the region of the Cayley Plains, demonstrating that volatile-rich rocks can occur on the lunar surface from outgassing of a volatile-poor lunar interior. The ‘Rusty Rock’ indicates that the lunar interior is significantly depleted in volatile elements and compounds and that volatile-rich lunar surface rocks likely formed through vapor condensation. Remote sensing studies have detected volatiles on the lunar surface, attributing them dominantly to solar wind. Based on the ‘Rusty Rock’, some of these surface volatiles may also originate from the Moon’s interior.

Dhaliwal, JK, Day JMD, Moynier F.  2018.  Volatile element loss during planetary magma ocean phases. Icarus. 300:249-260.   10.1016/j.icarus.2017.09.002   Abstract

Moderately volatile elements (MVE) are key tracers of volatile depletion in planetary bodies. Zinc is an especially useful MVE because of its generally elevated abundances in planetary basalts, relative to other MVE, and limited evidence for mass-dependent isotopic fractionation under high-temperature igneous processes. Compared with terrestrial basalts, which have δ66Zn values (per mille deviation of the 66Zn/64Zn ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard) similar to some chondrite meteorites (∼+0.3‰), lunar mare basalts yield a mean δ66Zn value of +1.4 ± 0.5‰ (2 st. dev.). Furthermore, mare basalts have average Zn concentrations ∼50 times lower than in typical terrestrial basaltic rocks. Late-stage lunar magmatic products, including ferroan anorthosite, Mg- and Alkali-suite rocks have even higher δ66Zn values (+3 to +6‰). Differences in Zn abundance and isotopic compositions between lunar and terrestrial rocks have previously been interpreted to reflect evaporative loss of Zn, either during the Earth-Moon formatting Giant Impact, or in a lunar magma ocean (LMO) phase. To explore the mechanisms and processes under which volatile element loss may have occurred during a LMO phase, we developed models of Zn isotopic fractionation that are generally applicable to planetary magma oceans. Our objective was to identify conditions that would yield a δ66Zn signature of ∼ +1.4‰ within the lunar mantle. For the sake of simplicity, we neglect possible Zn isotopic fractionation during the Giant Impact, and assumed a starting composition equal to the composition of the present-day terrestrial mantle, assuming both the Earth and Moon had zinc ‘consanguinity’ following their formation. We developed two models: the first simulates evaporative fractionation of Zn only prior to LMO mixing and crystallization; the second simulates continued evaporative fractionation of Zn that persists until ∼75% LMO crystallization. The first model yields a relatively homogenous bulk solid LMO δ66Zn value, while the second results in a stratification of δ66Zn values within the LMO sequence. Loss and/or isolation mechanisms for volatiles are critical to these models; hydrodynamic escape was not a dominant process, but loss of a nascent lunar atmosphere or separation of condensates into a proto-lunar crust are possible mechanisms by which volatiles could be separated from the lunar interior. The results do not preclude models that suggest a lunar volatile depletion episode related to Giant Impact. Conversely, LMO models for volatile loss do not require loss of volatiles prior to lunar formation. Outgassing during planetary magma ocean phases likely played a profound part in setting the volatile inventories of planets, particularly for low mass bodies that experienced the greatest volatile loss. In turn, our result suggest that the initial compositions of planets that accreted from smaller, highly differentiated planetesimals were likely to be severely volatile depleted.