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Day, JMD, Pearson DG, Hulbert LJ.  2008.  Rhenium-osmium isotope and platinum-group element constraints on the origin and evolution of the 1.27 Ga Muskox layered intrusion. Journal of Petrology. 49:1255-1295.   10.1093/petrology/egn024   AbstractWebsite

Platinum-group element (PGE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd) and Re-Os isotope systematics determined for the entire preserved stratigraphy of the 1.27 Ga Muskox intrusion provide an exceptional view of magma chamber processes and mineralization in the main plutonic system of the Mackenzie large igneous province (LIP). We present new Re-Os isotope data for the intrusion, together with PGE and trace element abundances, and oxygen and Sm-Nd isotope data on samples that include local crustal materials, layered series peridotites, stratiform chromitites, marginal and roof zone rocks, and the Muskox Keel feeder dyke. Intrusive rocks span wide ranges in initial isotopic compositions (gamma(Os)i=+1.0 to +87.6; epsilon(Nd)i = -0.4 to -6.6; delta(18)O(Ol) =+ 5.5 to + 6.9 parts per thousand) and highly siderophile element abundances (HSE: PGE and Re; Re =0.02-105 ppb; Pt =0.23-115 ppb; O(s)= 0.02 to > 200 ppb). HSE and fluid-immobile trace element abundance variations are consistent with relative compatibilities expected for cumulate rocks. The most radiogenic Os and unradiogenic Nd isotope compositions occur in the Muskox marginal and roof zones. Negative gamma(Os)i values in these rocks and their non-isochronous relations result from mobilization of Re in the intrusion through post-magmatic hydrothermal processes. The most significant process causing Os and Nd isotope variations in the layered series of the intrusion is crustal contamination of mantle-derived magma batches feeding individual cyclic units. This process may be directly responsible for formation of chromitite horizons within the intrusion. Accounting for crustal assimilation, the Muskox intrusion parental magma has gamma(Os)i = +1.2 +/- 0.3, epsilon(Nd)i > -1.0 +/- 0.4, delta(18)O similar to +5.5 parts per thousand and HSE abundances similar to those expected from >= 15% partial melting of the Mackenzie LIP mantle source. This composition is similar to that calculated for 1.27 Ga primitive upper mantle. Parental magmas were probably derived from a mantle source unaffected by long- term, large-scale melt depletion, with no appreciable input from recycled crust and lithosphere, or putative core contributions.

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O'Driscoll, B, Day JMD, Daly JS, Walker RJ, McDonough WF.  2009.  Rhenium-osmium isotope and platinum-group elements in the Rum Layered Suite, Scotland: Implications for Cr-spinel seam formation and the composition of the Iceland mantle anomaly. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 286(1-2):41-51.   10.1016/j.epsl.2009.06.013   Abstract

The Rum Layered Suite is a layered mafic–ultramafic body that was emplaced during Palaeogene North Atlantic margin rifting. It is a classic open-system magma chamber, constructed of 16 repeated coupled peridotite–troctolite units, some of which have laterally extensive ~ 2 mm-thick platinum-group element (PGE) enriched (~ 2 µg g− 1) Cr-spinel seams at their bases. In order to investigate Cr-spinel seam petrogenesis and enrichment of the PGE, abundances of these elements and Re–Os isotopes have been determined at three stratigraphic levels of the Rum Layered Suite that represent major magma replenishment events. Individual units preserve a range of initial 187Os/188Os ratios, demonstrating heterogeneity in the composition of replenishing magmas. Data for both the Cr-spinel seams and overlying silicates reveal that the processes that formed the Cr-spinel also concentrated the PGE, following magma replenishment. There is no evidence for structurally-bound PGE in Cr-spinel. Instead, the PGE budget of the Rum Layered Suite is linked to base metal sulphides, especially pentlandite, and to PGE alloys contained within the Cr-spinel seams, but which exist as separate phases at Cr-spinel grain boundaries. The range in initial Os isotope compositions (γOs = 3.4 to 36) in the Rum Layered Suite can be successfully modelled by 5–8% assimilation of Lewisian gneiss coupled with changing PGE contents in the replenishing magmas associated with sulphide removal. Initial 187Os/188Os ratios for Rum rocks range from 0.1305 to 0.1349 and are atypical of the convecting upper mantle, but are within the range for recently erupted picrites and basalts from Iceland and Palaeogene picrites and basalts from Baffin Island, Greenland and Scotland. Thus, the Os isotope data suggest that the North Atlantic Igneous Province magmas were collectively produced from a mantle source with components that remained relatively unchanged in Os isotopic composition over the past 60 Ma, and that likely contain a recycled lithospheric component.

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Riches, AJV, Day JMD, Walker RJ, Simonetti A, Liu Y, Neal CR, Taylor LA.  2012.  Rhenium–osmium isotope and highly-siderophile-element abundance systematics of angrite meteorites. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 353:208-218.   10.1016/j.epsl.2012.08.006   Abstract

Coupled 187Os/188Os compositions and highly-siderophile-element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) abundance data are reported for eight angrite achondrite meteorites that include quenched- and slowly-cooled textural types. These data are combined with new major- and trace-element concentrations determined for bulk-rock powder fractions and constituent mineral phases, to assess angrite petrogenesis. Angrite meteorites span a wide-range of HSE abundances from <0.005 ppb Os (e.g., Northwest Africa [NWA] 1296; Angra dos Reis) to >100 ppb Os (NWA 4931). Chondritic to supra-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1201–0.2127) measured for Angra dos Reis and quenched-angrites correspond to inter- and intra-sample heterogeneities in Re/Os and HSE abundances. Quenched-angrites have chondritic-relative rare-earth-element (REE) abundances at 10–15×CI-chondrite, and their Os-isotope and HSE abundance variations represent mixtures of pristine uncontaminated crustal materials that experienced addition (<0.8%) of exogenous chondritic materials during or after crystallization. Slowly-cooled angrites (NWA 4590 and NWA 4801) have fractionated REE-patterns, chondritic to sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1056–0.1195), as well as low-Re/Os (0.03–0.13), Pd/Os (0.071–0.946), and relatively low-Pt/Os (0.792–2.640). Sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os compositions in NWA 4590 and NWA 4801 are unusual amongst planetary basalts, and their HSE and REE characteristics may be linked to melting of mantle sources that witnessed prior basaltic melt depletion. Angrite HSE-Yb systematics suggest that the HSE behaved moderately-incompatibly during angrite magma crystallization, implying the presence of metal in the crystallizing assemblage.

The new HSE abundance and 187Os/188Os compositions indicate that the silicate mantle of the angrite parent body(ies) (APB) had HSE abundances in chondritic-relative proportions but at variable abundances at the time of angrite crystallization. The HSE systematics of angrites are consistent with protracted post-core formation accretion of materials with chondritic-relative abundances of HSE to the APB, and these accreted materials were rapidly, yet inefficiently, mixed into angrite magma source regions early in Solar System history.

S
Sato, KN, Andersson AJ, Day JMD, Taylor JRA, Frank MB, Jung JY, McKittrick J, Levin LA.  2018.  Response of sea urchin fitness traits to environmental gradients across the Southern California oxygen minimum zone. Frontiers in Marine Science. 5   10.3389/fmars.2018.00258   AbstractWebsite

Marine calcifiers are considered to be among the most vulnerable taxa to climate-forced environmental changes occurring on continental margins with effects hypothesized to occur on microstructural, biomechanical, and geochemical properties of carbonate structures. Natural gradients in temperature, salinity, oxygen, and pH on an upwelling margin combined with the broad depth distribution (100-1,100 m) of the pink fragile sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus (formerly Allocentrotus) fragilis, along the southern California shelf and slope provide an ideal system to evaluate potential effects of multiple climate variables on carbonate structures in situ. We measured, for the first time, trait variability across four distinct depth zones using natural gradients as analogues for species-specific implications of oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion, deoxygenation and ocean acidification. Although S. fragilis may likely be tolerant of future oxygen and pH decreases predicted during the twenty-first century, we determine from adults collected across multiple depth zones that urchin size and potential reproductive fitness (gonad index) are drastically reduced in the OMZ core (450-900 m) compared to adjacent zones. Increases in porosity and mean pore size coupled with decreases in mechanical nanohardness and stiffness of the calcitic endoskeleton in individuals collected from lower pH(Total) (7.57-7.59) and lower dissolved oxygen (13-42 mu mol kg(-1)) environments suggest that S. fragilis may be potentially vulnerable to crushing predators if these conditions become more widespread in the future. In addition, elemental composition indicates that S. fragilis has a skeleton composed of the low Mg-calcite mineral phase of calcium carbonate (mean Mg/Ca = 0.02 mol mol(-1)), with Mg/Ca values measured in the lower end of values reported for sea urchins known to date. Together these findings suggest that ongoing declines in oxygen and pH will likely affect the ecology and fitness of a dominant echinoid on the California margin.